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HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Old-fashioned vinegar is the best thing to quickly neutralize a skin burn caused by alkaline chemicals found in household cleaners, drain openers and industrial solvents. "Common cleaning supplies that contain alkalis, such as sodium hydroxide, can be found under any kitchen sink," said Dr. Stephen Milner, co-author of a study published in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for Olympic archer Justin Huish argued in court Wednesday that the gold medalist should not be held on drug-sale charges because he was providing marijuana for the treatment of an HIV patient. But that defense, raised during Huish's preliminary hearing, met a quick objection from a Ventura County prosecutor who said state law allows only qualified caregivers to treat medical marijuana patients. Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nilo Amier massages Bag Balm into her chapped hands. Formulated 100 years ago to soften the udders of milking cows, the salve works just as well on people, said Amier, who tends a half-acre mini-ranch in Tarzana. "And it sure beats Vaseline." Canyon Country feed dealers Odie Fox and his son Jerry swear by Flex Free, a pricey supplement for easing stress and strains in horses. One dissolves a pinch of the bitter powder in his orange juice. The other sprinkles it on breakfast cereal.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned the death sentence of a mentally disturbed murderer who was being forcibly medicated by Louisiana prison officials so that he could be executed. The case of Michael Owen Perry has been the most closely watched death penalty case of the current term because it tested the willingness of the court's dominant conservatives to uphold executions.
HEALTH
August 14, 2006 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
WHEN fungus invaded her toenails 10 years ago, Ruth Carsch of San Francisco didn't care too much at first. Her nails became "thick and fat and yellow," says the 61-year-old information specialist, but she could always hide that behind colorful nail polish. What she really minded, she says, was how the nail plates grew so thick from the infection that they squashed the toes beneath. "My toes are much fatter than they used to be. My feet are wider," Carsch says. "It seems to have deformed my toes."
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | DAVID SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court dealt a defeat Monday to the medical marijuana movement, ruling that federal law prohibits dispensing the drug to seriously ill patients to relieve their pain and nausea. As a legal matter, the 8-0 ruling all but invalidates the measures adopted in California and eight other states that give sick people a "right" to obtain marijuana for medical purposes.
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
One of the more serious complications of diabetes is a disabling condition called diabetic neuropathy. Because people with diabetes have excessive levels of blood sugar, nerves can become damaged, causing sharp pain that disturbs sleep, numbness in the hands or feet, digestive problems, ulcerations that can lead to foot amputations, and even sudden death if the nerves to the heart are affected.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The analysis of St. John's wort commissioned by The Times examined whether retail products were as potent as they claimed to be. The analytical technique, called spectrophotometry, tested each product for a family of compounds known collectively as hypericin. Scientists say that hypericin is not the only, and probably not even the primary, ingredient with antidepressant activity in St. John's wort.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fumie Suzuki was 21 when she was found to have leprosy. Her family locked her in a room and slid her food through the doorway. After a year, she was exiled to an isolated leprosarium. Alone, she made the journey to a colony to which no roads led, stumbling on her weak, nerve-damaged legs. Her mother's parting words were: "Never come back. And die quickly."
OPINION
March 13, 2013 | By Kevin M. Dirksen and Neil S. Wenger
The 911 call last month that led to an emergency dispatcher begging workers at a Bakersfield senior living facility to perform CPR on a woman captured the attention of the public. A staff worker told the dispatcher it was against the facility's policy to intervene. The woman, Lorraine Bayless, died. It is difficult to understand how liability concerns could dissuade anyone from helping a person in distress. However, this stark event should awaken us to another question: Should we be performing CPR on 87-year-olds in a community setting such as a senior home?
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