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Medical Treatments

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
By successfully treating a little-known disorder that is often misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy, researchers are gaining valuable insight into an entire class of chronic neurologic conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The disease, known as Segawa's dystonia, may afflict as many as 10,000 people in the United States but often goes unrecognized. Like cerebral palsy, the crippling disorder is marked by tremors and rigidity.
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NEWS
July 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Prompted by questions about patient privacy rights, House Republicans considered but rejected a delay in a program to give every American a computer identification number to track health care from birth to death. In a 1996 law, Congress directed the Clinton administration to implement the plan. But the administration has moved slowly, fearing sensitive information about health and medical treatments could land in the wrong hands.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and JOEL SAPPELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Emerging from years of internal strife and public scandal, the Scientology movement has embarked on a sweeping and sophisticated campaign to gain new influence in America. The goal is to refurbish the tarnished image of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and elevate him to the ranks of history's great humanitarians and thinkers. By so doing, the church hopes to broaden the acceptability of Hubbard's Scientology teachings and attract millions of new members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A medicine approved last month to treat AIDS also shows promise against hepatitis B. The drug, 3TC, suppresses the hepatitis B virus in people with chronic infections, stopping its damage to the liver, a team from Massachusetts General Hospital reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. About 1 million Americans are thought to be infected with hepatitis B, which, left untreated, can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure and liver cancer in a small portion of victims.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She would have a tough time, she thought, but she'd get through to this family sitting before her. As head of a hospital pediatric intensive-care unit, she considered herself highly skilled at communicating hope when it existed, futility when it didn't. Hers wasn't an easy task, but she'd been doing it for 15 years. Sometimes she saw miracles, sometimes she saw kids pull through, but she'd also seen lots of misery. There had been no shortage of misery. This case among them.
SPORTS
March 6, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The doctor who treated Hank Gathers after he fainted during a game Dec. 9 said Monday that the Loyola basketball star was healthy enough to play. "There was no debate as to what Hank was able to do," said Michael F. Mellman, an internist with Centinela Hospital Medical Center and a team doctor for the Dodgers and Kings. "In my mind he was physically capable to go out and play. But there was concern as to what Hank's problems were.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
Gallstones, a health problem believed to afflict up to 25 million Americans, can be dissolved in many cases quickly and safely with the help of a solvent widely used as an octane enhancer in gasoline, Mayo Clinic researchers reported today. The experimental therapy, described in the New England Journal of Medicine, is one of several novel approaches to gallstones that experts hope will revolutionize gallstone treatment and eliminate the need for hundreds of thousands of surgeries.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Using too much Lindane to treat lice infestations can cause deadly brain or nerve damage, federal health officials warned, stressing that the prescription drug should not be used on babies and "with great caution" on children. Once sold in large bottles, Lindane now is to come only in 1- or 2-ounce packets for one-time use, and doctors are told not to prescribe more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California orthopedic "specialist" who developed a controversial muscle treatment was arrested by Newport Beach police and state medical investigators Friday on suspicion of practicing medicine without a license, and his associate, a Colorado physician, was arrested on suspicion of conspiracy. Milne Ongley, whose Institute of Orthopedic Medicine has offices in Newport Beach and San Diego, and his associate, Dr.
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