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HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Old-fashioned vinegar is the best thing to quickly neutralize a skin burn caused by alkaline chemicals found in household cleaners, drain openers and industrial solvents. "Common cleaning supplies that contain alkalis, such as sodium hydroxide, can be found under any kitchen sink," said Dr. Stephen Milner, co-author of a study published in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.
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SCIENCE
January 9, 2013 | Melissa Healy
After all those well-intentioned New Year's resolutions have yielded to the force of habit, many of the nation's 79 million obese adults will have a day of reckoning with their primary care physicians. Lose weight and get active, the doctor will order, or risk developing diabetes. Then the MD will scribble a prescription. For most patients, the prescribed treatment will not be a pill. It will be a 12-week program aimed at preventing Type 2 diabetes by getting obese adults to shed as little as 10 pounds and exercise for a little more than 20 minutes a day. That regimen -- the Diabetes Prevention Program -- may soon become the blockbuster prescription medicine you've never heard of. In 2013, it is poised to become the envy of pharmaceutical companies, a new rival to programs such as Weight Watchers, and a target of opportunity for healthcare entrepreneurs.
HEALTH
July 19, 2004 | Daffodil J. Altan, Times Staff Writer
Vertigo. For most people, the word summons images of Jimmy Stewart dangling from high places in Alfred Hitchcock's classic thriller by the same name. It means something else, however, to hundreds of thousands of people who experience the strange, dizzying affliction. The most common cause of vertigo, known as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, usually can be treated with one visit to the doctor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for Olympic archer Justin Huish argued in court Wednesday that the gold medalist should not be held on drug-sale charges because he was providing marijuana for the treatment of an HIV patient. But that defense, raised during Huish's preliminary hearing, met a quick objection from a Ventura County prosecutor who said state law allows only qualified caregivers to treat medical marijuana patients. Deputy Dist. Atty.
HEALTH
August 14, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
The first outbreak was devastating enough. But within weeks came another outbreak. Then another and another. For Gina Caprio, then 22, the virus that causes genital herpes was nightmarish, "like my life was over." An antiviral drug managed to keep the virus under control, preventing recurrences, but she had to take it every day, year-round.
HEALTH
August 6, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL
Recently, I've been doing a lot of yard work and as a consequence my hands are covered with wounds and Band-Aids. Plus a flea jumped onto my knee yesterday. Perhaps it's not surprising that the subject of bloodletting popped into my mind. Of course, many people know that in centuries past doctors and barber-surgeons used to "bleed" their hapless patients to help balance the body's humors (phlegm, blood, yellow and black bile).
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Although non-Hodgkin's lymphoma like that contracted by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis is normally considered one of the more curable cancers, nearly half of those who develop it die within five years. "Even in the best of (treatment) programs, one-third of patients don't respond well, and two-thirds ultimately die of the disease," said Dr. Rex Greene, chief of the cancer teaching program at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nilo Amier massages Bag Balm into her chapped hands. Formulated 100 years ago to soften the udders of milking cows, the salve works just as well on people, said Amier, who tends a half-acre mini-ranch in Tarzana. "And it sure beats Vaseline." Canyon Country feed dealers Odie Fox and his son Jerry swear by Flex Free, a pricey supplement for easing stress and strains in horses. One dissolves a pinch of the bitter powder in his orange juice. The other sprinkles it on breakfast cereal.
HEALTH
July 2, 2007 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The product: Unless your radio dial is stuck on NPR, you've probably heard a few pitches for SkinZinc, a "revolutionary" treatment for psoriasis. The radio ads -- featuring glowing testimonials from alleged customers -- have clearly made an effect. "Patients ask about SkinZinc very frequently," says Dr. Kenneth Gordon, assistant professor of dermatology at Northwestern University and a medical board member of the National Psoriasis Foundation.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
I knew I had hit bottom the evening my husband approached me with the jar of spaghetti sauce. I was 10 weeks pregnant and hellishly ill from morning sickness--a misnomer if there ever was one. Like many other women, I was sick at all hours of the day and night--a predicament that lasted, in my case, for almost five months. So there he was, walking determinedly across the room holding out the opened jar of spaghetti sauce, offering me a whiff of a pungent, possibly moldy sauce.
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