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Medical Treatments

OPINION
March 13, 2013 | By Kevin M. Dirksen and Neil S. Wenger
The 911 call last month that led to an emergency dispatcher begging workers at a Bakersfield senior living facility to perform CPR on a woman captured the attention of the public. A staff worker told the dispatcher it was against the facility's policy to intervene. The woman, Lorraine Bayless, died. It is difficult to understand how liability concerns could dissuade anyone from helping a person in distress. However, this stark event should awaken us to another question: Should we be performing CPR on 87-year-olds in a community setting such as a senior home?
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NEWS
December 14, 1989 | ROBERT J. VICKERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.), contending that the federal government has disregarded promising medical treatments for narcotics addiction, on Wednesday proposed a 10-year strategy to encourage development of new anti-drug medicines. Biden, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, released a committee report recommending a national agenda to speed development of such treatments.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
In a case that has gripped Europe, an Austrian court has ordered that a 6-year-old girl with a cancerous tumor be given chemotherapy treatment despite her parents' objections. The decision was made after medical experts determined it was a matter of life and death, the girl's court-appointed guardian said. Olivia Pilhar was transferred early Saturday from a hospital in Tulln, 25 miles northwest of Vienna, to the intensive care ward at Vienna's general hospital.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | ROD McCULLOM, Times Staff Writer
The operators of a Huntington Beach mail-order operation have agreed to stop claiming that a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water can prevent cancer and ease arthritis pain, the U.S. Postal Service said Monday. Postal Service officials said that Kurt Donsbach, founder of DRK Supplements, and his nephew, Richard Donsbach, have signed a consent agreement to stop falsely representing their product through mail-order sales.
HEALTH
October 30, 2006 | Elena Conis
A "fiery serpent" that plagued the Israelites in the Old Testament and that's been found in Egyptian mummies continues to afflict tens of thousands of people today. The ancient parasitic sickness, known as Guinea worm disease, can still be cured only with an ancient remedy. But experts say the disease is on the verge of becoming ancient history, despite its age-old persistence and the lack of advances in medical treatments.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
Thousands of American servicemen who were given nasal radiation treatment decades ago by military doctors may be at risk for further health problems, the Defense Department said Wednesday. The Pentagon said it is working with the Veterans Affairs Department to identify and notify servicemen who participated in the radiation treatments, which were given for inner-ear problems.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | STEPHANI SUTHERLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial surgical treatment for emphysema results in a high death rate for some patients, according to early results from a nationwide study of treatments for the illness. The study tracked 1,033 patients who were divided into two groups: one receiving the surgery and the other receiving nonsurgical treatments. Of those patients, 140 fell into the high-risk group--those who already have severe lung damage from the disease.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
For centuries, legends of a “fountain of youth” have beguiled people across the globe. But Americans are decidedly uneasy about whether science should actually help people push death far into the future. Roughly half of Americans surveyed by the Pew Research Center said medical treatments that stretch lifespans to 120 years or more would be bad for society. Even more shunned the idea of undergoing such treatments to extend their own lives, Pew found. Pushing off death so far might seem like the stuff of science fiction.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Women who have frequent vaginal yeast infections can now obtain medication without a prescription. Gyne-Lotrimin can be purchased over the counter since its January approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Another medication, Monistat, also has been approved and should be available within the next week to 10 days. The federal agency occasionally honors requests from pharmaceutical companies to reclassify drugs if certain safety considerations are met.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | From United Press International
Former Philippines first lady Imelda Marcos was back in court Monday at her racketeering trial, wearing heart and blood pressure monitors. She had left the courtroom pale and sobbing during testimony Friday and her illness was diagnosed as high blood pressure. She sat holding rosary beads as U.S. Customs Service official Leslie Kinney described a suitcase seized from the Marcoses containing negotiable stocks.
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