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Medical Treatments

NEWS
November 12, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Cancer is by nature unfair, capriciously stalking children and grandparents, corporate presidents and clerks, super athletes and shut-ins. Still, there is a sense that this most feared of afflictions is an act of fate, rather than anyone's fault. The same cannot be said, however, for the access to cancer treatment. Too often, patients are left to their own devices in the search for the best possible medical care, cancer experts and patient advocates say.
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NEWS
March 22, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that the popular diabetes pill Rezulin--a drug that won "fast-track" government approval but was linked to scores of liver failures and deaths--will be withdrawn promptly from the U.S. market. Compared to alternative diabetes treatments, "continued use of Rezulin now poses an unacceptable risk to patients," said Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's drug evaluation center.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | OLIVER FULTZ, AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE SERVICE
We all know about the country's budget deficit--but what about the back-pain deficit? As you read this, 31 million Americans are experiencing back pain, at an annual cost of $16 billion in medical treatments and disability payments. The additional cost to the economy in lost workdays is tens of billions of dollars. That's a lot of aching backs--and wallets. That's a lot of worried people, too, because once injured, a back is four times more likely to get hurt again.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | ROBERT J. VICKERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.), contending that the federal government has disregarded promising medical treatments for narcotics addiction, on Wednesday proposed a 10-year strategy to encourage development of new anti-drug medicines. Biden, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, released a committee report recommending a national agenda to speed development of such treatments.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
In a case that has gripped Europe, an Austrian court has ordered that a 6-year-old girl with a cancerous tumor be given chemotherapy treatment despite her parents' objections. The decision was made after medical experts determined it was a matter of life and death, the girl's court-appointed guardian said. Olivia Pilhar was transferred early Saturday from a hospital in Tulln, 25 miles northwest of Vienna, to the intensive care ward at Vienna's general hospital.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | ROD McCULLOM, Times Staff Writer
The operators of a Huntington Beach mail-order operation have agreed to stop claiming that a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water can prevent cancer and ease arthritis pain, the U.S. Postal Service said Monday. Postal Service officials said that Kurt Donsbach, founder of DRK Supplements, and his nephew, Richard Donsbach, have signed a consent agreement to stop falsely representing their product through mail-order sales.
HEALTH
October 30, 2006 | Elena Conis
A "fiery serpent" that plagued the Israelites in the Old Testament and that's been found in Egyptian mummies continues to afflict tens of thousands of people today. The ancient parasitic sickness, known as Guinea worm disease, can still be cured only with an ancient remedy. But experts say the disease is on the verge of becoming ancient history, despite its age-old persistence and the lack of advances in medical treatments.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
Thousands of American servicemen who were given nasal radiation treatment decades ago by military doctors may be at risk for further health problems, the Defense Department said Wednesday. The Pentagon said it is working with the Veterans Affairs Department to identify and notify servicemen who participated in the radiation treatments, which were given for inner-ear problems.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | STEPHANI SUTHERLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial surgical treatment for emphysema results in a high death rate for some patients, according to early results from a nationwide study of treatments for the illness. The study tracked 1,033 patients who were divided into two groups: one receiving the surgery and the other receiving nonsurgical treatments. Of those patients, 140 fell into the high-risk group--those who already have severe lung damage from the disease.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The 15,000 psychologists attending the annual American Psychological Assn. meeting here departed Tuesday with a major question looming: Is what they do--talk therapy--becoming less relevant in the treatment of mental health disorders?
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