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SCIENCE
August 6, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
For centuries, legends of a “fountain of youth” have beguiled people across the globe. But Americans are decidedly uneasy about whether science should actually help people push death far into the future. Roughly half of Americans surveyed by the Pew Research Center said medical treatments that stretch lifespans to 120 years or more would be bad for society. Even more shunned the idea of undergoing such treatments to extend their own lives, Pew found. Pushing off death so far might seem like the stuff of science fiction.
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NEWS
August 25, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a medical researcher's greatest fear. And for Dr. Jay Hoofnagle, a hepatitis B expert at the National Institutes of Health, it began to take root at 11:30 p.m. Friday, June 25, when the telephone rang in his Rockville, Md., home. Hoofnagle and his colleagues had been testing an extremely promising new drug, fialuridine, or FIAU, on a group of human subjects.
NEWS
January 2, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Norman Schwarzkopf's prostate cancer almost wasn't detected. "When you are a general, the doctors don't tend to do a thorough digital rectal exam," says the leader of America's Gulf War forces. Even though he had none of the symptoms, Schwarzkopf had been doing a lot of reading about prostate cancer. So, during a hospital visit for a different purpose, he asked a urologist to do a more thorough exam. The doctor felt a tiny lump.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
CoCensys Inc. said Monday that it has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to test its stroke treatment drug on people. Under the development agreement with CoCensys, the decision obligates Swiss pharmaceuticals giant Ciba-Geigy Ltd. to buy $5 million of CoCensys stock. The news gave CoCensys' stock a 15.4% boost in Monday's Nasdaq trading. It gained 50 cents a share to close at $3.75.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Straight Inc. opened its drug treatment center for adolescents in Orange County last summer at the request of frantic parents whose children had been stranded in mid-treatment when another rehabilitation program went out of business. KIDS of Southern California ran its program out of the same Yorba Linda warehouse now used by Straight and employed similar confrontational treatment methods, according to former clients.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Cancer is by nature unfair, capriciously stalking children and grandparents, corporate presidents and clerks, super athletes and shut-ins. Still, there is a sense that this most feared of afflictions is an act of fate, rather than anyone's fault. The same cannot be said, however, for the access to cancer treatment. Too often, patients are left to their own devices in the search for the best possible medical care, cancer experts and patient advocates say.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that the popular diabetes pill Rezulin--a drug that won "fast-track" government approval but was linked to scores of liver failures and deaths--will be withdrawn promptly from the U.S. market. Compared to alternative diabetes treatments, "continued use of Rezulin now poses an unacceptable risk to patients," said Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's drug evaluation center.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | OLIVER FULTZ, AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE SERVICE
We all know about the country's budget deficit--but what about the back-pain deficit? As you read this, 31 million Americans are experiencing back pain, at an annual cost of $16 billion in medical treatments and disability payments. The additional cost to the economy in lost workdays is tens of billions of dollars. That's a lot of aching backs--and wallets. That's a lot of worried people, too, because once injured, a back is four times more likely to get hurt again.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | ROBERT J. VICKERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.), contending that the federal government has disregarded promising medical treatments for narcotics addiction, on Wednesday proposed a 10-year strategy to encourage development of new anti-drug medicines. Biden, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, released a committee report recommending a national agenda to speed development of such treatments.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
In a case that has gripped Europe, an Austrian court has ordered that a 6-year-old girl with a cancerous tumor be given chemotherapy treatment despite her parents' objections. The decision was made after medical experts determined it was a matter of life and death, the girl's court-appointed guardian said. Olivia Pilhar was transferred early Saturday from a hospital in Tulln, 25 miles northwest of Vienna, to the intensive care ward at Vienna's general hospital.
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