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Medicare Fraud

BUSINESS
April 17, 2003 | Ronald D. White and Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writers
Pharmaceutical giants Bayer and GlaxoSmithKline on Wednesday reached a record-setting Medicare fraud settlement over allegations they overcharged millions of dollars for popular prescription drugs. Bayer, based in Germany, agreed to pay $257 million to settle allegations that it overcharged Medicare for prescription drugs including Cipro, the popular antibiotic used during the U.S. anthrax scare. A Bayer spokesman said the company did not believe it had done anything illegal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government has sued a North Hollywood ophthalmologist convicted of submitting fraudulent Medicare claims in an effort to recover at least $150,000, authorities said Monday. Dr. Alan R. Schankman was found guilty last year in Los Angeles Superior Court in Van Nuys of 36 grand theft counts in connection with the bogus billings for eye surgeries that never occurred, said Assistant U.S. Atty. David A. Ringnell.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the largest such financial penalty ever imposed on a health care company, the nation's biggest hospital chain tentatively agreed Thursday to pay the government $745 million to settle civil charges that it systematically defrauded the Medicare program for years. But the settlement does not end the federal investigation of--or the potential financial liability for--Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp., which operates 220 facilities in 22 states, including eight hospitals in California.
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A secret star witness, his identity cloaked by a black hood, is scheduled to be spirited Wednesday 3through the marble halls of the historic Dirksen Senate Office Building to an ornate hearing room jammed with corporate attorneys and powerful lobbyists anticipating the worst. In years past, Congress has reserved such high drama for Mafia snitches and union racketeers who had blown the whistle on corruption or mismanagement.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
The Justice Department accused Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. of Medicare fraud at nine south Florida hospitals in the government's sixth lawsuit against the nation's largest hospital chain. The lawsuit, originally brought by a former reimbursement manager with the company, accuses the hospitals of overbilling Medicare for home health-care services by more than $10 million. It seeks more than $30 million in damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
A businessman agreed Monday to plead guilty to Medicare fraud in which he netted more than $1 million by fabricating reimbursement claims for wheelchairs and other devices that he never delivered to patients or weren't medically necessary. Authorities said Vasu Deo, 43, owner of Vasu Wheelchair Repair in Van Nuys, also will plead guilty to paying kickbacks to physicians for signing off on false claims that he submitted. Assistant U.S. Atty.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2000 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. attorney's office in Miami won't pursue allegations of Medicare fraud against five current or former employees of Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. and Olsten Corp., sources close to the investigation say. The decision, which government attorneys disclosed earlier this month to lawyers representing the employees, comes after more than 18 months of investigation into allegations of kickbacks in the firms' home health-care operations.
NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Medicare scams seem to come with the holiday season, especially during the open-enrollment period that lasts through the end of the year. Scammers typically seek financial information from seniors over the phone in a scheme that amounts to Medicare identity theft. A South Florida Sun Sentinel story describes it this way: "The callers in the latest scheme claim to work for insurance giant Humana or its CarePlus subsidiary, and say they need the senior's birth date, Social Security, bank account and Medicare numbers to arrange the refund, Humana officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2008 | Scott Glover, Times Staff Writer
For an ex-con fresh out of Chino State Prison, Donald Noyola seemed to be wildly exceeding expectations -- on paper, anyway. Noyola was listed as president, secretary and chief financial officer of Sycamore Medical Supply Co. in Los Angeles, a small firm so busy that it billed Medicare for more than $1.3 million in reimbursements over nine months last year, court records show.
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