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NEWS
March 28, 1996 | Associated Press
A woman who was reunited with her mother 40 years after being given up for adoption has been convicted of breaking the woman's neck. Constance Agnes Miller, 61, was found guilty Tuesday of voluntary manslaughter in the slaying of her 83-year-old mother, Antoinette Smith, after they argued about Miller's medications and that her mother called her Agnes, the name she was given at birth.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 2008
As persons living with HIV/AIDS and growing older -- we are two of the subjects of the Feb. 5 Times article about growing older with HIV/AIDS -- we wish to make an important point concerning an article by Daniel Costello ("HIV treatment becoming profitable," Feb. 21). Pharmaceutical companies have made great inroads in treating HIV/AIDS itself, most significantly with once-a-day dosing. However, there are innumerable side effects of the medications. Aging only exacerbates those. It is vital that those who may become infected understand that one pill a day will not remain the norm for very long.
HEALTH
December 8, 1997
I read your article on the flu [Dec. 1] with interest and, from a public health education point of view, thought you and the writers did a good job. I am a little bothered however by the bullet ("Vitals"): "A survey of 1,008 adults found that 25% believe nothing treats the flu (there are two antiviral medications that can be given at the first sign of symptoms). . . ." Actually, these medications are of dubious efficacy and quite expensive. They definitely fall outside the local standard of care for treating the flu in otherwise healthy patients and are typically reserved for patients with severe underlying disease.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A welter of medications sold over the counter and by prescription can spell fast relief from the churning discomfort of acid reflux and heartburn, and the class of drugs known as proton-pump inhibitors has grown powerfully popular with Americans. But the watchdog group Public Citizen on Tuesday asked the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to warn Americans that these drugs can be habit-forming and carry a wide range of other dangers. Public Citizen complained that medications known by such commercial names as Nexium, Prilosec, Zegerid and Prevacid are widely overprescribed and used routinely by people who don't need them.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Children taking stimulant medications to quell symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a very low risk of suffering heart attack, stroke or sudden, unexplained death, and the probability that they will suffer such a crisis doesn't appear any higher than that of their peers who take no ADHD medications, says a new study from American Academy of Pediatrics. That is good news for the 2.7 million American children between ages 4 and 17 -- two-thirds of those diagnosed with ADHD -- who take medication to improve their focus and self-control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001
Re "States Move to Cut Cost of Drugs," July 30: There is one group of people who should not be the beneficiaries of mandatory drug discounts: smokers. Someone who smokes just one pack a day would have at least $90 a month for medicines if they would quit. If a smoker quits, lo and behold, he or she often ceases to require as many medications. Why should more of my taxes go to subsidize a lifestyle that leads to more medication use and provides no benefits except for nicotine highs? Joey Liu Newbury Park
OPINION
June 24, 2001
As a person living with AIDS, I applaud Bill Gates for his $100-million donation to fight AIDS on a global scale (June 20). Also, President Bush deserves credit for committing $200 million to this end. However, I strongly believe we should take care of our own before we save the world. There are people with AIDS in this country who cannot afford medications, basic medical care or housing. Beside s, what happened to drug benefits for Medicare recipients? Dean Riner Laguna Beach
SPORTS
December 16, 2000
Regarding Grahame Jones' Dec. 10 soccer column, where L.A. Coliseum general manager Pat Lynch states "that the Coliseum's large crowds--for instance, 61,072 for the USA-Mexico match on Oct. 25--are proof that people feel perfectly safe." Please send me a list of Mr. Lynch's medications because I would love to get my hands on whatever drugs he's on. Safe?! At the Oct. 25 U.S.-Mexico match?! Not only is he not on the same planet as the rest of us, he's not even in the same dimension.
OPINION
November 23, 2004
Re "Early Vioxx Alarms Alleged," Nov. 19: Well, well. A government official warns that our drug oversight system leaves Americans virtually defenseless against dangerous pharmaceuticals. Seems as if the medical community is fast losing its credibility when it warns patients to beware of herbal supplements that lack Food and Drug Administration approval. Instead, that lack of approval is beginning to sound more like an endorsement for natural alternatives. Jill Chapin Santa Monica The recent Vioxx debacle just confirms what anyone with serious health issues has known for a long time: The FDA is a sick joke.
OPINION
November 15, 2012
If one doctor's prescriptions might be connected to the unnecessary deaths of multiple patients over several years, the state should be asking questions. Times reporters Scott Glover and Lisa Girion analyzed 3,733 prescription drug-related deaths in four Southern California counties, revealing that just 71 doctors - one-tenth of 1% in those counties - had written prescriptions in 17% of such fatalities over six years. One doctor profiled in the stories published Sunday had prescribed medications for 16 patients who subsequently overdosed, according to coroner's reports.
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