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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Doctors must receive training in outpatient settings, not just teaching hospitals, because skyrocketing costs "now keep all but the sickest patients out of the hospital," researchers said last week. Traditional internship and residency in strictly hospital settings, the researchers said, no longer reflect a health-care system in which increasing numbers of procedures are performed in ambulatory facilities. "There are whole topics of medicine, diseases, observations, actions and decisions that are just not encountered in the care of hospitalized patients any longer," Dr. Daniel D. Federman of Harvard Medical School wrote in an editorial accompanying two articles in the New England Journal of Medicine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - A 52-year-old La Mesa man Friday was sentenced to five years in prison after being convicted of practicing medicine without a license and promising to cure patients of AIDS, cancer and other maladies. Desperate, terminally ill patients paid up to $40,000 to Keith Barton for cures, prosecutors said. A 60-year-old woman suffering from an autoimmune disease followed Barton's advice to have all her teeth extracted as part of an ineffective treatment called "dentritic cellular therapy," according to court documents.
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SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
When it comes to treating pain, a new study suggests traditional Chinese medicine has been getting it right for thousands of years. A chemical compound found in the underground tubers of the Corydalis plant can effectively alleviate three different types of pain in mice, according to a paper published Thursday in the journal Current Biology. The study also shows that mice do not build up a resistance to the naturally occurring compound, which means it could one day be used for managing chronic pain in humans.
OPINION
March 15, 2014 | By Philip Levitt
American hospitals have a big problem with unnecessary deaths from medical errors. Estimates of the numbers vary widely, but extrapolating from the best studies, a conservative estimate would be that well over 100,000 people a year die unnecessarily because of errors made by their healthcare teams. And the numbers have remained high despite concerted efforts to bring them down. Why? Because we've embraced a so-called solution that doesn't address the problem. For the last 14 years, the medical profession has put its faith in a systems approach to the problem.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | By Emily Sohn
With at least two flus and plenty of colds, coughs and sore throats circulating this season, some Americans are turning to zinc to ward off viruses. Lozenges, supplements and nasal sprays that contain the mineral claim to boost immunity, and there is some evidence that they might do so. In an effort to stay well, though, we might be making ourselves sick. Consistently taking excessive FOR THE RECORD: Dietitian's name: An earlier version of this article misspelled the name of dietitian Ruth Frechman as Frenchman.
OPINION
July 26, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky. His cartoons also appear in USA Today.
Cartoonists invoked plenty of inflamed invective to inform a healthy debate on the healthcare reform battle. Mike Lester's O.R. Obama is no smooth operator. (Scalpel! Clamp! Jackhammer!) Tony Auth's elephant in the nursery had a sick, infanticide fantasy. (Mask! Gloves! Pillow!) And Rob Rogers' throwback family displayed one giant misplaced leap of faith in mankind. (Hope! Change! Disappointment!) -- Joel Pett
OPINION
September 18, 2013 | By Glenn D. Braunstein
This year, 36.6 million people will be admitted to U.S. hospitals. Each patient will stay an average of 4.8 days, and the cost for all those hospitalizations will reach into the billions. Is all that time spent in hospitals good for patients? Hospitals, of course, are vital institutions that save lives. When someone needs intensive, around-the-clock care, there is no substitute. But as physicians and hospital staffs know well, the longer a patient stays in a hospital, the more perilous the hospitalization can become.
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Re "First the cat, now the health system sinks teeth in me," Column, Jan. 15 I am sorry about that horrible ordeal David Lazarus experienced, including his problems with the money side of our healthcare system. However, I am concerned that one of the aspects of Obamacare that Lazarus supports will have doctors making more money by not treating patients. If a doctor gets a fixed amount to treat you (say, $8,000) and "pockets" the amount not spent, then who is to say that he will treat you to the fullest extent?
OPINION
July 18, 2013
Re "Alluring but risky medicine," Opinion, July 7 Dr. Paul A. Offit's theory of "conventional" versus "alternative" medicine misses the point that Americans have moved beyond choosing one or the other. Instead, we are integrating all the options available for good health, including the use of vitamins and other dietary supplements. More than 150 million Americans take dietary supplements every year, and consumer research shows that supplement users are generally higher educated, with higher incomes, and are more likely than those who don't take supplements to also engage in other healthy behaviors, such as trying to eat a healthy diet, exercising routinely and visiting their doctor regularly.
NEWS
October 17, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The line between candy and medicine can be a fine one, at least when it comes to looks, a study finds. Researchers tested 30 kindergarten students and 30 teachers to see if they could distinguish popular candies from over-the-counter medicines. And although you might be thinking you could tell the difference, even the adults didn't get it right 100% of the time. The students guessed correctly on average 70.5%, while teachers averaged 77.6% correct answers. Students who could read (these were kindergartners, remember)
SPORTS
March 8, 2014 | BILL SHAIKIN
Frank Jobe batted third at Cooperstown last summer, in the annual awards ceremony on the Saturday before the induction ceremony. Paul Hagen led off, a distinguished baseball writer from Philadelphia. Shirley Cheek followed, the widow of the late Tom Cheek, a beloved broadcaster for the Toronto Blue Jays. The names of Paul Hagen and Tom Cheek would be forever displayed within the Hall of Fame. Jobe's award did not come with a permanent place inside the Hall of Fame -- an error that ought to be rectified forthwith -- but the good doctor nonetheless was delighted with his moment in the Cooperstown sun. Jobe rose to his feet, slowly.
SCIENCE
March 5, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
For the first time in more than four decades, the drug lysergic acid diethylamide -- better known as LSD -- has been the experimental adjunct to psychotherapy in a controlled clinical trial approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. And a newly published study on that trial reports that the medication's anti-anxiety effects on patients facing life-threatening illnesses were sizable, sustained -- and free of worrisome side effects. In short, everything was groovy. In a pilot study conducted in Switzerland, 12 patients suffering deep anxiety due to serious illnesses participated in several drug-free psychotherapy sessions, and then joined a pair of therapists for two full-day psychotherapy sessions, separated by two to three weeks, under the influence of LSD. After tapering off any anti-anxiety or antidepressant medications and avoiding alcohol for at least a day, subjects in the trial were given either a 200-microgram dose of LSD or an "active placebo" of 20 micrograms of the drug.
OPINION
February 4, 2014 | By Wendy Orent
Doctors used to call influenza "knock-me-down" fever, and there was a reason for that. Anyone who's suffered through a bout of it knows the miseries: the headaches, the throat that feels scrubbed with sandpaper, the fever so high you're floating on the edge of delirium. And then there is the cough, the muscle pain, the general misery. Worse still: Flu can kill, though not often, and typically only the very young, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems. So what do you do?
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | By Malcolm Potts
Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that a group of Colorado nuns will not be required to offer contraceptive coverage to employees while pursuing its legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act. The nuns' action highlights the misunderstandings and theological errors behind the Vatican's condemnation of what it terms "artificial contraception. " And it also overlooks an important medical point: The nuns might have something to gain from taking oral contraceptives. But first, some background on the history of contraception.
SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The NBA's top players can be divided into three categories at next month's All-Star game: The West, the East and the creased. Several stars will be wearing freshly pressed suits as the result of injuries that have seemingly left no roster untouched. Derrick Rose, Brook Lopez and Al Horford have been sidelined for the rest of the season, and Chris Paul, Russell Westbrook and Kobe Bryant all hope to return within the next month. Dr. Riley J. Williams III, medical director for the Brooklyn Nets and sports medicine surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York (not to mention a lifelong Lakers fan who played football at Loyola High in Los Angeles)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Debuting Tuesday as part of the PBS series "American Experience," "The Poisoner's Handbook" offers a fascinating look back at how the chemical age changed police work. Based on Deborah Blum's 2010 book "The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York," it is divided into toxin-specific "chapters," (cyanide, arsenic, carbon monoxide, lead, radium, denatured alcohol and so on), but there is nothing particularly instructional about it. A certain sort of viewer might get ideas, of course, but should he watch to the end he will learn that poisoning is a hard crime to get away with anymore.
HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | By Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
AS they seek to document and demystify one of life's great thrills, scientists have run across some real head-scratchers. How, for example, can they explain the fact that some men and women who are paralyzed and numb below the waist are able to have orgasms? How to explain the "orgasmic auras" that can descend at the onset of epileptic seizures -- sensations so pleasurable they prompt some patients to refuse antiseizure medication? And how on Earth to explain the case of the amputee who felt his orgasms centered in that missing foot?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999
The recent pieces by Gillian Gunn Clissold (Commentary, Jan. 8) and Wayne Smith (Opinion, Jan. 10) accurately portray the halfhearted new policy initiative on Cuba by the Clinton administration. Our relief agency is fully licensed by the U.S. government to provide medical aid to Cuba. What the new policy fails to do is allow us any better means of providing that aid. On Jan. 8, we were forced to send lifesaving medications to a pediatric hospital in Havana by buying a full-fare airline ticket through Mexico to Havana and having a staff person hand-carry an ice chest with the medicines.
SCIENCE
January 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Among the many stents, surgical clamps, pumps and other medical devices that have recently come before the Food and Drug Administration for clearance, none has excited the widespread hopes of physicians and researchers like a machine called the Illumina MiSeqDx. This compact DNA sequencer has the potential to change the way doctors care for patients by making personalized medicine a reality, experts say. "It's about time," said Michael Snyder, director of the Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine.
SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
When it comes to treating pain, a new study suggests traditional Chinese medicine has been getting it right for thousands of years. A chemical compound found in the underground tubers of the Corydalis plant can effectively alleviate three different types of pain in mice, according to a paper published Thursday in the journal Current Biology. The study also shows that mice do not build up a resistance to the naturally occurring compound, which means it could one day be used for managing chronic pain in humans.
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