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HOME & GARDEN
May 22, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Lynda Guber's days sizzled with stress. Her husband, Peter, ran Sony Pictures. Everyone wanted favors. She had to change her life. Her first step: "I decided I would drop everything that didn't serve my dharma." When a yogi anointed her with the name of a Buddhist goddess, Tara, she took it as her own. Empowered by this beloved and compassionate deity, Tara Guber began to move down the spiritual path that led to the creation of her personal refuge, "a place to get away to serve the spirit."
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HEALTH
March 17, 2012 | Jeannine Stein
We know filmmaker David Lynch for the dark surrealism of "Eraserhead," "Blue Velvet," "Inland Empire" and "Twin Peaks," as well as for his deep, abiding love of coffee. Lynch is also passionate about transcendental meditation, which he first took up "on a beautiful, sunny Saturday morning" in 1973. That passion spawned a book, "Catching the Big Fish," and the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace. Lynch spoke about what TM means for him and why others should try it too. Catch the longer podcast at latimes.com/davidlynch.
TRAVEL
September 8, 2013
If you go Silent Stay Retreat Home & Hermitage, 3570 Cantelow Road, Vacaville; (707) 474-4833, http://www.silentstay.com . Three-night retreats from $345 to $425 (depending on accommodation type), plus a nonrefundable $50 registration fee. The price includes guided meditation and spiritual counseling on request.
TRAVEL
May 28, 2000 | LUCRETIA BINGHAM, Lucretia Bingham is a freelance writer formerly of Los Angeles, now based in Old Lyme, Conn
The bell pierced my sleep. I groaned and opened my eyes. It was not yet dawn, and it was cold. Our cabin, with all of its windows, was more exposed to the elements than a tent. It was 5:30 a.m., and my niece, Jalena, and I were expected in the meditation room by 6. On a Saturday. We asked for this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Sri Daya Mata, a Mormon from Utah who became enchanted by a Hindu mystic as a teenager and went on to lead the Los Angeles-based Self-Realization Fellowship for 55 years, has died. She was 96. The religious leader died Tuesday of natural causes at one of the fellowship's nuns' retreats in Los Angeles, where she had been living in seclusion, said spokeswoman Lauren Landress. Daya Mata, whose name in Sanskrit means Mother of Compassion, was the third president of the Self-Realization Fellowship, a worldwide organization founded in 1920 by Indian yoga master Paramahansa Yogananda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000
On Dec. 21, the night of the winter solstice, the fire and high winds that destroyed thousands of acres of forest and chaparral swept over the hilltops east of Ojai occupied by Meditation Mount and the Ojai Valley School. The local Fire Department and units from all over Southern California set up operations in the parking lot of Meditation Mount to continue battling the flames. At about 4 a.m., as the fire was surrounding the Ojai Valley School on the next hill above Meditation Mount, our residents were told to evacuate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1989
Three firebombs were hurled early Monday at a Northridge home where Buddhist services are held, igniting a fire that heavily damaged the house but injured no one, the Los Angeles Fire Department reported. The 3:23 a.m. fire in the 8300 block of Yolanda Avenue burned the wood-shingle roof and front windows of the house belonging to Pradit and Pachri Phongpharnich, authorities said. The couple and their two teen-age children escaped unharmed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2002 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Michael Kennedy looks out at the rows of heads bowed in prayer, the tattooed necks and drab institutional garb of Central Juvenile Hall in Los Angeles. He peers into young hearts wounded by violence and bearing charges of murder, robbery and drug-dealing. Here in these dark, treacherous places, he feels the presence of God.
HEALTH
February 8, 2010
Everyone agrees that stressful situations make your blood pressure take off. It's the fight-or-flight, prepare-to-do-something-dramatic response your ancient ancestors had when being charged by a woolly mammoth. Your body releases stress hormones that make your heart beat faster and your blood vessels constrict, and blood pressure rockets. When the stressful situation is resolved, blood pressure comes back down. Some scientists suspect that getting stressed out too often can lead to chronic high blood pressure.
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