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Mediterranean Diet

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NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Mediterranean diet has been linked to a host of health benefits, including a lower risk of heart disease , cancer and diabetes . A study finds that the diet may also be associated with a decreased chance of small vessel damage in the brain. The diet , popular in Mediterranean countries, includes little red meat but lots of fresh vegetables and fruit, lean proteins, whole grains and healthy monosaturated fats from olive oil and nuts. In the study, released Monday in the Archives of Neurology , researchers analyzed diet information on 966 people, average age 72, who answered a food questionnaire to see how close they came to consuming a Mediterranean diet.
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SCIENCE
January 6, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Even without weight loss, adhering to a diet rich in fresh produce, chicken, fish and olive oil is 40% more effective in heading off the development of Type 2 diabetes than following a low-fat diet, a new study has found. The research suggests that for the nation's 78 million obese adults, a diet that minimizes red meat and sweets but incorporates plant-based fats may be a sustainable way to improve health - even if permanent weight reduction proves elusive. The findings add to mounting research that suggests a traditional Mediterranean diet may be easier to adhere to and more likely to improve health than more restrictive regimens.
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NEWS
March 8, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
The Mediterranean diet has had many fans over the years, even in the scientific community. A new analysis of 50 studies involving half a million participants reinforces what many healthcare professionals already have said about the diet: It helps lower the risk of heart disease and diabetes. The analysis published online Monday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology examined how the diet affects metabolic syndrome, that is, disorders that increase the risk of heart disease.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
It's no surprise that someone who has never smoked, who eats a Mediterranean diet and keeps a normal weight and who exercises regularly is healthy. How healthy? Chances of death from all causes is reduced by 80% over eight years. Pretty healthy. Those four healthy behaviors also protected against heart disease and the buildup of calcium deposits in the arteries, the researchers said. Those are the results of a multiyear study of more than 6,000 people led by Johns Hopkins University researchers and published online Monday in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In a head-to-head contest, a Mediterranean diet, even drenched in olive oil and studded with nuts, beat a low-fat diet, hands-down, in preventing stroke and heart attack in healthy older subjects at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The latest smack-down in the diet wars appears to deal a knock-out blow to the notion that high-fat olive oil and tree nuts - walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts - are a no-no for those wishing to improve their health. On the contrary, Spanish researchers concluded that the consumption of extra-virgin olive oil and nuts "were probably responsible for most of the observed benefits" attained by those in the two groups following a Mediterranean diet.
NEWS
October 6, 2010
Was there ever a time when we didn't have a bottle of olive oil in the kitchen? The traditional Mediterranean diet was introduced to Americans about 17 years ago after it officially was endorsed by the Harvard School of Public Health and the World Health Organization. With an emphasis on fruits, vegetables, nuts and whole grains as well as more fish and less red meat, the diet continues to be the darling of doctors and nutritionists. If you aren't familiar with the details of this food plan, MayoClinic.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Karin Klein
It sounds like a happy hour dream: Now, scientists say, you can have your wine and eat the nuts that go with it, and be healthier in the bargain. A rigorous new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine should finally put to rest any doubts about whether a Mediterranean diet -- rich in olive oil or nuts as well as fish, with a glass of wine per day also allowed -- promotes better cardiovascular health than the way most of us eat. It does. That might not be surprising, but up to now, advice on the Mediterranean diet has been based on correlation: People in Mediterranean areas that tend to follow that way of eating experienced lower incidence of stroke and other cardiovascular problems.
SCIENCE
January 6, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Even without weight loss, adhering to a diet rich in fresh produce, chicken, fish and olive oil is 40% more effective in heading off the development of Type 2 diabetes than following a low-fat diet, a new study has found. The research suggests that for the nation's 78 million obese adults, a diet that minimizes red meat and sweets but incorporates plant-based fats may be a sustainable way to improve health - even if permanent weight reduction proves elusive. The findings add to mounting research that suggests a traditional Mediterranean diet may be easier to adhere to and more likely to improve health than more restrictive regimens.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2003 | From Reuters
A study of more than 22,000 Greeks provided further evidence Wednesday that a Mediterranean diet rich in cheese, nuts and olive oil can protect against heart disease and cancer. The study found that people who ate a Mediterranean diet had a 33% lower risk of death from heart disease and a 24% lower cancer death rate compared to volunteers who ate other foods. Vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, unrefined cereals, olive oil, cheese and yogurt are eaten most days, as is fish.
FOOD
July 27, 1995 | COLMAN ANDREWS, Andrews is executive editor of Saveur. This article is based on his research for a book, "Riviera: The Cooking of Liguria and Nice," to be published next year by Bantam. and
The media have proclaimed far and wide . . . the advantages of a simple, tasty and at the same time healthy diet which has been the norm all along Mediterranean shores since ancient times.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Brooke Burke-Charvet is sharing her tips on aging gracefully and staying healthy now that she's beaten her thyroid cancer. The "Dancing With the Stars" co-host revealed her cancer diagnosis in early November through a video posted on her blog. She was diagnosed after 10 biopsies, she said. Burke-Charvet underwent surgery in early December and shared the news a week later that she was cancer-free. By January, she was exposing her surgery scar on "Good Morning America. " She said she beat her cancer by having a strong support system from her family and team and keeping a postiive attitude.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Is it just my imagination, or is California (and possibly a good part of the nation) turning a corner on same-sex marriage? Certainly, the winds have been shifting for a while. Polls have shown increasing acceptance for years. That fits with findings that younger people are far more likely to be comfortable with gay rights than older people. President Obama, who during the campaign for his first term said he did not favor same-sex marriage - the same election in which Proposition 8 passed -- had changed his mind by his second campaign.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
So, it's Sequester's Eve, and all through the White House (and the House and the Senate), not a creature is stirring, not even John Boehner. Out in the hinterlands, folks are putting up their Sequester trees, decorating them with $1, $5, $10 and $20 bills. Some have strung together coins in long, looping chains. And government workers are hanging furlough notices and/or pink slips. All for that magical moment Friday morning when everyone will gather around the tree and scramble to grab as much money as possible before it's all gone.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Karin Klein
It sounds like a happy hour dream: Now, scientists say, you can have your wine and eat the nuts that go with it, and be healthier in the bargain. A rigorous new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine should finally put to rest any doubts about whether a Mediterranean diet -- rich in olive oil or nuts as well as fish, with a glass of wine per day also allowed -- promotes better cardiovascular health than the way most of us eat. It does. That might not be surprising, but up to now, advice on the Mediterranean diet has been based on correlation: People in Mediterranean areas that tend to follow that way of eating experienced lower incidence of stroke and other cardiovascular problems.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In a head-to-head contest, a Mediterranean diet, even drenched in olive oil and studded with nuts, beat a low-fat diet, hands-down, in preventing stroke and heart attack in healthy older subjects at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The latest smack-down in the diet wars appears to deal a knock-out blow to the notion that high-fat olive oil and tree nuts - walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts - are a no-no for those wishing to improve their health. On the contrary, Spanish researchers concluded that the consumption of extra-virgin olive oil and nuts "were probably responsible for most of the observed benefits" attained by those in the two groups following a Mediterranean diet.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Some popular diets advise against late-night snacking or even eating after 6 p.m. Now, there's some research to confirm that when you eat could matter as well as what you eat if you're trying to shed pounds. A study in Spain followed 420 men and women on a diet for 20 weeks. They were grouped into early eaters -- those who had their main meal before 3 p.m. - and late eaters - those who had it after. (The participants followed the Mediterranean diet, in which the main meal was lunch.)
MAGAZINE
March 25, 1990 | COLMAN ANDREWS, Colman Andrews writes the Restaurant Notebook for Sunday Calendar.
AMERICANS have recently discovered the so-called Mediterranean diet, an eating style common to inhabitants of the Mediterranean basin that is high in fiber, low in saturated fats and full of grains, fruit, vegetables and seafood. This diet is old news in Europe. French food writer Austin de Croze was aware of it as early as 1931.
HEALTH
November 21, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Americans tend to like their fats saturated, their grains processed, their protein grown on legs and their sugar added anywhere their sweet tooth decides it would like some. As for fiber, they're all for it - in, say, their French fries or the pickles on their burger. In a related development, nutrition experts tend to be bummed out by the typical American diet. In fact, many wish we'd trade it in for a diet that's pretty much the opposite, namely, the Mediterranean diet, which favors monounsaturated fat, whole (unprocessed)
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Moderately obese people who ate the Mediterranean diet lost more weight than groups of people who followed either a low-fat or a low-carbohydrate diet, researchers reported. The Mediterranean group weighed almost seven pounds less than they weighed six years earlier. In the low-carb group, the total was 3.7 pounds, and the low-fat group was 1.3 pounds. The Mediterranean diet is one based on the eating habits of people who live in that part of the world -- high in produce, and including olive oil and fish.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Mediterranean diet has been linked to a host of health benefits, including a lower risk of heart disease , cancer and diabetes . A study finds that the diet may also be associated with a decreased chance of small vessel damage in the brain. The diet , popular in Mediterranean countries, includes little red meat but lots of fresh vegetables and fruit, lean proteins, whole grains and healthy monosaturated fats from olive oil and nuts. In the study, released Monday in the Archives of Neurology , researchers analyzed diet information on 966 people, average age 72, who answered a food questionnaire to see how close they came to consuming a Mediterranean diet.
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