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NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
While campaigning in California Monday morning, Mitt Romney pounced on President Obama's offhand comments to Russian leaderDmitri A. Medvedev - calling the conversation caught on a hot microphone “an alarming and troubling development.” During a nuclear security summit meeting in Seoul, Obama was captured on tape telling Medvedev that after the November election he would “have more flexibility. " The remarks were interpreted by some as a suggestion that Obama plans to delay discussions with Russian leaders about a missile defense system based in Europe that has been a source of tension between the two nations.
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WORLD
April 16, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russia's economy has been hit hard by the Ukraine crisis, prompting finance officials to cut growth forecasts for this year to near zero and draining the country's hard currency reserves as investors flee an uncertain market, Kremlin officials disclosed Wednesday. In an address to the lower house of parliament, Economic Development Minister Alexei Ulyukayev said $63 billion had been converted from rubles to hard currencies and taken out of the country in the first quarter of this year.
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NEWS
April 28, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The Communist Party has restored membership to dissident historian Roy A. Medvedev, whose writings about the personality cult of dictator Josef Stalin prompted his expulsion in 1969, Tass said today. Medvedev had asked the party's Central Committee Control Committee to be restored as a party member, and the request was approved, the official news agency said without giving a date for the action. Like many Soviets who had fallen out of official favor, Medvedev has gradually been restored to good graces.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Political science professor Sergei Medvedev, a longtime lover and explorer of the Arctic, drew the ire of Russian President Vladimir Putin when he recently called for international protection of the icy northern region in the face of economic development plans. Last month, Putin called Medvedev, who teaches at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, "a moron. " The incident prompted a nationwide discussion of the Arctic and coincided with the arrest of 30 Greenpeace activists protesting a Russian oil drilling project in the region.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Roy A. Medvedev, a leading Soviet historian who was expelled from the Communist Party 20 years ago for exposing the extent of the dictator Josef Stalin's crimes, has been fully exonerated and reinstated as a party member, the official Tass news agency reported Friday. The party's control committee, which reviewed Medvedev's case, for years a focus of controversy, "concluded that he had been expelled from the party without grounds," Tass said. The committee reinstated him as a member since 1959, the year he was originally admitted as a full member.
WORLD
April 16, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russia's economy has been hit hard by the Ukraine crisis, prompting finance officials to cut growth forecasts for this year to near zero and draining the country's hard currency reserves as investors flee an uncertain market, Kremlin officials disclosed Wednesday. In an address to the lower house of parliament, Economic Development Minister Alexei Ulyukayev said $63 billion had been converted from rubles to hard currencies and taken out of the country in the first quarter of this year.
BOOKS
August 5, 1990
Regarding David Marples' review of "Chernobyl: The Catastrophe Isn't Over Yet" by Zhores A. Medvedev (July 8), I plan to read this book even though I am leery of any book written by ethnic Russians--like Medvedev--about events in Ukraine. I hope the author points out the Russian practice of building nuclear plants in non-Russian republics, in case of nuclear "accidents." However, these plants are managed by the Russians themselves because they do not trust the native population.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Four years of reforms have failed to bring the dramatic economic improvements that the Soviet Union had hoped for, a top Soviet official said Friday, and the Communist Party leadership now believes that even bolder changes are urgently needed. Vadim A. Medvedev, the party's secretary for ideology and a member of its ruling Politburo, acknowledged in a major review of the country's political and economic situation that "until now, no tangible results in meeting the everyday needs of the people have been achieved."
WORLD
December 11, 2011 | Sergei L. Loiko
Cheerful and smiling, in groups of friends, lovers and associates, carrying white balloons, flowers and ribbons, they came together in the massive square on an island embraced by the Moscow River. For most, it was the first time: successful young bank managers and businessmen, computer programmers and engineers, lawyers and real estate agents. The tens of thousands of protesters who joined forces Saturday in the largest demonstration here since the collapse of the Soviet Union were united in one chant: "Russia without Putin!"
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg and Robin Abcarian
LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Mitt Romney took up the cudgels again against Russia on Monday, telling a radio interviewer that “almost everything we try to do globally, they try and oppose.” He accused President Obama, once again, of going soft on his Russian counterparts. The Obama campaign has ridiculed Romney for saying earlier this year that Russia was “without question, our No. 1 geopolitical foe.” Asked about that during a telephone interview with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, Romney neither repeated his claim nor backed down from it. “Russia is a geopolitical adversary, meaning that almost everything we try to do globally they try and oppose,” he said.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2013 | By David Horsey
In the middle of the G-8 summit in Northern Ireland early this week, the host, British Prime Minister David Cameron, and his closest international partner, President Obama, were embarrassed by the latest revelations of secret spying sprung on them by elusive whistle-blower Edward Snowden.  Reported in Britain's Guardian newspaper, Snowden provided information about British and U.S. spying operations during past Group of 8 summits and the G-20...
WORLD
February 23, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - The day last month that Russian lawmakers gave initial approval to a bill establishing fines for spreading "propaganda" supporting homosexuality among minors, leading Russian media personality Anton Krasovsky was fired after publicly revealing that he is gay. While anchoring a late-night TV show on Jan. 25, Krasovsky, 37, said that not only is he gay, he is also "as human as President [Vladimir] Putin, Prime Minister [Dmitry] Medvedev" and the members of the parliament. Krasovsky, who served as editor in chief of Kontr TV, an Internet and cable television network launched by the Kremlin in December, said in an interview recently that human rights and liberties are violated more and more and that "mutual hatred and resentment is being instilled in the Russian society from above.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg and Robin Abcarian
LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Mitt Romney took up the cudgels again against Russia on Monday, telling a radio interviewer that “almost everything we try to do globally, they try and oppose.” He accused President Obama, once again, of going soft on his Russian counterparts. The Obama campaign has ridiculed Romney for saying earlier this year that Russia was “without question, our No. 1 geopolitical foe.” Asked about that during a telephone interview with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, Romney neither repeated his claim nor backed down from it. “Russia is a geopolitical adversary, meaning that almost everything we try to do globally they try and oppose,” he said.
WORLD
June 28, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - For four years, Igor Yurgens was one of the closest advisors of Russian President Dmitry Medvedev. The 59-year-old businessman reportedly was one of the main forces backing the idea that Medvedev should remain Russia's president for a second term; instead, Vladimir Putin returned to the presidency in May. On Wednesday, Yurgens, director of the Institute of Contemporary Development, announced his decision to leave the Presidential Council...
WORLD
April 24, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - President-elect Vladimir Putin said Tuesday that he would resign as chairman of the United Russia party after his inauguration in early May and indicated that outgoing President Dmitry Medvedev should serve as both prime minister and leader of the party. Medvedev stepped down after one term as president to allow Putin, who was serving as prime minister, to again seek the presidency, which he held for two terms before Medvedev's tenure. Putin was elected last month after a lengthy series of demonstrations in which tens of thousands of opponents took to the streets to demand an end to Putin's rule and to call United Russia "the party of swindlers and thieves.
WORLD
March 27, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL — President Obama has said he plans to continue negotiations with Russia this year involving a U.S. missile defense system to protect Europe and is not trying to "hide the ball" in dealing with the matter. Obama said Tuesday that he wants to spend time this year working through technical issues with the Russians. In a private conversation made public by a live microphone, President Obama on Monday appeared to be putting off diplomatic talks with Russian leaders about the controversial missile defense system until after the November election, prompting quick attacks from the president's Republican rivals.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
While campaigning in California Monday morning, Mitt Romney pounced on President Obama's offhand comments to Russian leaderDmitri A. Medvedev - calling the conversation caught on a hot microphone “an alarming and troubling development.” During a nuclear security summit meeting in Seoul, Obama was captured on tape telling Medvedev that after the November election he would “have more flexibility. " The remarks were interpreted by some as a suggestion that Obama plans to delay discussions with Russian leaders about a missile defense system based in Europe that has been a source of tension between the two nations.
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