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Medvedev

WORLD
September 29, 2010 | Sergei L. Loiko
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev fired Moscow's popular mayor on Tuesday, three weeks into a high-level public spat that analysts said exposed a battle for power inside the Kremlin. Medvedev, who is on a state visit to China, issued a decree stripping Yuri Luzhkov of the job he has held since 1992 on the grounds that he had lost the trust of the president. The 74-year-old mayor rebuilt the city, improved its roads, increased subsidies for the disabled and pensions for the elderly.
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WORLD
September 15, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
It is a spectacle as old as Kremlin intrigue, but new to the Russia of Vladimir Putin. The country's main national television channels, all controlled by the Kremlin, have launched a series of blistering reports accusing one of the heavyweights of Russian politics, Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov, of neglecting his duties, abusing his office and engaging in corruption. Analysts have little doubt that the reports represent a campaign against the mayor, who has been in office for 18 years, a period in which his wife has amassed a fortune in the construction business estimated at $2.9 billion.
WORLD
August 26, 2010 | By Julia Ioffe, Los Angeles Times
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on Thursday announced that he had ordered highway work crews to stop cutting down trees in a renowned nature preserve outside Moscow. The statement came just hours after leaders of the ruling United Russia Party had urged him to reexamine the controversial project. Despite previous government and judicial approval of the construction effort, the project "demands additional analysis," Medvedev said in the statement on his video blog. The fate of the Khimki forest has become a flash point in recent months as civic groups have organized increasingly large protests against the project, a badly needed highway linking Moscow and St. Petersburg.
WORLD
August 3, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
From the smoke of the wildfires engulfing the Moscow region and the embarrassment of this summer's spy scandal, Vladimir Putin is reemerging as Russia's most powerful man and, experts say, a candidate to reclaim the presidency a little more than a year and a half from now. For more than two years since term limits forced him to give up office and take the prime minister's job instead, Putin and his protege, President Dmitry Medvedev, have seemed...
OPINION
July 1, 2010
The FBI rolled up a Russian spy ring in suburban America just days after President Dmitry Medvedev tooled around Silicon Valley, netting an iPhone 4 from Apple's Steve Jobs and a promised $1-billion investment from Cisco Systems. The leader of the United States' Cold War foe then chowed down on cheeseburgers with President Obama in Arlington, Va., at a diner blocks from the apartment of one of the alleged secret agents. Agents, by the way, who apparently never sent home any secrets. John LeCarre might have discarded this story as beggaring belief, but it's a true-life collision of past and present relations with Moscow.
WORLD
April 8, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
With an agreement to scale back the weaponry of the world's two greatest nuclear powers, President Obama and Russian President Dimitry Medvedev signed a long-sought treaty that still will require the ratification of both governments. One year after unveiling his vision here for a world without nuclear weapons, Obama returned this morning to sign a treaty with the Russian president that both sides call a major step forward on worldwide arms control. In a ceremony at the medieval Prague Castle, Obama and Medvedev signed a "New START" treaty that administration officials say will bring U.S. and Russian nuclear arsenals to their lowest levels since the early 1960s.
WORLD
March 26, 2010 | By Paul Richter
President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev reached final agreement Friday on a nuclear arms treaty that would cut the nuclear arsenals of the onetime rivals to the lowest levels since the 1960s. With a morning phone call, the two leaders settled the final details of an eight-month negotiation, and they are to meet April 8 in Prague, Czech Republic, to sign the pact, which replaces the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty of 1991. Announcing the accord at the White House, Obama acknowledged that the talks, which were slowed by differences over the sensitive issues of verification and missile defense, were tough.
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