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Meg Caldwell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Stanford Law School lecturer Meg Caldwell was unanimously elected chairwoman of the California Coastal Commission on Wednesday by her fellow commissioners, strengthening Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's potential influence over the highly independent political body. Soon after Caldwell took the gavel, the commission approved a new storage facility for spent nuclear fuel at the Diablo Canyon power plant, near San Luis Obispo, in exchange for Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Stanford Law School lecturer Meg Caldwell was unanimously elected chairwoman of the California Coastal Commission on Wednesday by her fellow commissioners, strengthening Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's potential influence over the highly independent political body. Soon after Caldwell took the gavel, the commission approved a new storage facility for spent nuclear fuel at the Diablo Canyon power plant, near San Luis Obispo, in exchange for Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday removed three Democrats from the California Coastal Commission -- including former California Resources Secretary Mary Nichols -- and replaced them with three Republicans, including an executive at his former talent agency. Steven H.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - An overwhelming majority of Americans is convinced that sea level rise resulting from climate change poses a significant threat to the United States and coastal communities should invest in preparing for the risks, according to a survey released Thursday by Stanford University. The study was conducted with memories still fresh of Hurricane Sandy's vast damage and protracted, expensive rebuilding, whose cost was picked up largely by taxpayers. Although past surveys have asked Americans if they accept climate change to be a global reality, the survey by Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment focuses on attitudes about one of its effects - sea level rise - and the options to deal with it. The responses, taken together, indicated that most Americans were no longer willing to accept a hands-off approach to continued coastal development that will get battered repeatedly by rising seas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Stanford University and Monterey Bay Aquarium and its research institute, with $25 million from the Packard Foundation, on Wednesday launched a new academic center that will focus not on the problems plaguing the world's oceans, but on how to solve them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2005 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
The California Coastal Commission voted unanimously Thursday to object to federal efforts to extend three dozen oil and gas leases off the state's coastline so that oil companies could begin exploratory drilling. The commission, which includes appointees of Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, concluded that federal authorities failed to provide sufficient information on the potential for oil spills and other environmental risks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2005 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court on Thursday removed a legal cloud that had threatened to wipe out 30 years of restrictions on coastal development, ruling unanimously that the makeup of the state Coastal Commission meets constitutional requirements. The ruling, written by Chief Justice Ronald M. George, ends years of legal wrangling and uncertainty over the regulatory agency, which controls development along 1,100 miles of California's coastline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2006 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
With his popularity lagging, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger seized center stage at a United Nations conference in June 2005 by unfurling an ambitious plan for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the most populous state. "As of today," he said, "California is going to be the leader in the fight against global warming." By standing against climate change, the Republican governor set himself apart from the Bush administration and laid claim to a central environmental issue in his reelection effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
A state blue-ribbon panel unanimously approved landmark fishing restrictions Tuesday for Southern California, creating a patchwork of havens for marine life designed to replenish the seas while leaving some waters open for anglers. The plan, approved 5 to 0 during a meeting at which emotions boiled over briefly into shouting and shoving, was a compromise intended to sustain the 250-mile coastline's environmental as well as economic health -- forged during a year of contentious negotiations between conservationists and fishing interests.
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