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Megan S Law

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
In its first 24 hours, the city's new Web site showing the neighborhoods where sex offenders live received nearly 1 million hits, causing the system to freeze and forcing installation of a second server, officials said Friday. Although the site does not show specific addresses, it allows parents and others to see on a map how many sex offenders live in their communities and the approximate location of their homes.
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NEWS
December 16, 2001 | DEE-ANN DURBIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The boy was 10 when a slightly older neighbor in his northeastern Michigan town asked him to play. The two climbed into a treehouse with the neighbor's 9-year-old sister. There, he said, the neighbor told the boy to have sex with the girl. "I didn't know what I was doing," said the boy, now 18, who asked that his name not be used because of fear of harassment. "It was kind of like me and a girl playing doctor."
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Gov. Bill Owens issued an executive order Thursday to use a task force to track down and arrest about 300 sex offenders who have not registered under a month-old law. The Colorado Bureau of Investigation has verified that 8,100 of the state's 8,421 convicted sex offenders have registered with local authorities, agency spokesman Mike Igoe said. Under the law that took effect July 1, sex offenders must register within 72 hours of their release.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court ruled that juveniles who commit sex offenses before age 14 should have the chance to clear their records by their 18th birthdays to avoid being listed as sex offenders. A New Jersey law, known as Megan's Law, requires many sex offenders to register with police so the communities they live in can be notified of their offenses.
OPINION
October 1, 2000 | Michael Dear and Django Sibley, Michael Dear is director of USC's Southern California Studies Center. Django Sibley is a graduate student at USC and an officer in the Humberside Police (U.K.)
In late August, Monrovia police took a series of unusual steps to get a high-risk sex offender out of their city. Following California law, twice-convicted child molester Aramis Dominguez Linares informed the police of his address after he moved in with his sister's family. The Monrovia Police Department subsequently petitioned the state's Department of Justice to declare Linares a "high-risk" sex offender, which allowed it toinform the general public of Linares' whereabouts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Monrovia police said Wednesday that they had raised more than $700 for air fare and expenses to send a high-risk sex offender back to Nevada after neighborhood protesters drove him out. Reno police detectives said they believe that Aramis Dominguez Linares, a twice-convicted child molester, has arrived in their city, but they had yet to locate him Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Did Monrovia police go too far by distributing fliers that warned of a registered sex offender moving into a neighborhood, inciting panic and daily protests? That was a lingering question as residents along West Olive Avenue declared victory Tuesday, convinced that their pickets and catcalls had forced Aramis Dominguez Linares, a twice-convicted child molester from Nevada, to move from his sister's Monrovia home.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | Associated Press
A federal judge ruled Wednesday that state authorities can resume warning residents about sex offenders who live nearby. Judge Maryanne T. Barry of the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals set aside an April court order freezing Megan's Law notifications until a dispute over how these notifications were being conducted could be resolved.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court has ordered a freeze on sex offender notifications in New Jersey until it has time to review the fairness of procedures being used by officials who issue the warnings. U.S. District Judge Joseph Irenas last week ruled that the state's Megan's Law guidelines, as revised by state Atty. Gen. John Farmer, provided a reasonable system for warning neighbors about sex offenders while making sure the privileged information was not leaked to the community at large. But the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1999 | PHIL WILLON and NEDA RAOUF, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Families on Natal Drive in Westminster probably went to bed last night unaware that a convicted rapist was living just a few houses away. Residents of the blue-collar neighborhood would have learned about him months ago if only they had taken a few minutes to go down to the city Police Department. There, gathering dust, is the agency's "Megan's Law" computerized database, listing every serious and high-risk sex offender registered in California. It's open to the public.
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