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Megawati Sukarnoputri

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NEWS
July 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
In an emotional address, presidential front-runner Megawati Sukarnoputri asked Indonesia's government to step aside, announcing that her party had been chosen in last month's elections to purge corruption from the crisis-riven nation. Although the results of the ballot have not been released, unofficial tallies endorsed by most major parties showed that Megawati's party won with 34% of the vote. The ruling Golkar Party placed second with 22%.
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WORLD
September 21, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Former security minister Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono seemed set today to win Indonesia's presidential election, a victory that would mark the first time the country's leader was removed by popular vote. Yudhoyono, a U.S.-trained former general who pledged to revive the economy and crack down on terrorism, was leading President Megawati Sukarnoputri 60% to 40%, with about half of the votes counted.
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WORLD
September 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Police in Indonesia shot blanks into the air and fired water cannons and tear gas at about 9,000 people protesting the candidacy of Jakarta's governor, a former general accused of rights abuses. Gov. Sutiyoso was, as expected, reelected by city councilors. Sutiyoso, who goes by one name, commanded the Jakarta garrison in 1996 when soldiers attacked the party offices of opposition leader Megawati Sukarnoputri, who is now president. Several dozen people were killed or abducted.
WORLD
September 19, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
President Megawati Sukarnoputri is not trying to be a strong leader -- and it shows. She avoids interviews, disdains news conferences and declines invitations to debate. Her public appearances are carefully scripted to avoid putting her on the spot. She has no presidential spokesperson. Her supporters call her "introspective." She calls herself an "ordinary housewife." Soon, Megawati will find out whether her detached style of leadership works in a democratic Indonesia.
NEWS
October 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
Opposition delegates unanimously elected the daughter of Indonesia's founding president as chairwoman of her opposition group Saturday, the first step in her bid for the country's presidency. Megawati Sukarnoputri, daughter of independence leader and former President Sukarno, was the only candidate on the ballot of her faction of the Indonesian Democratic Party and got every vote--along with shrieks of joy and wild applause.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The life and political career of Megawati Sukarnoputri, Indonesia's new vice president, has been shaped in the shadow of her late father, President Sukarno. To many she is a mystery, an aloof and distant figure who lives a life of privilege and, in the Javanese manner, avoids confrontation. Critics question her intellect, and even supporters admit that her prominence rests on being the daughter of modern Indonesia's founder. But Indonesians do not doubt the strengths she brings to her job.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Incumbent President Suharto's most popular challenger is Megawati Sukarnoputri, the daughter of President Sukarno, who proclaimed Indonesia's independence and helped found this nation in 1945. An elegant, quietly assured woman whom some have dismissed as "a mere housewife," she has become a significant leader in her own right. When the government replaced her as head of the Indonesian Democratic Party in 1996 with a Suharto-backed candidate, it sparked the fiercest riots in decades.
WORLD
September 21, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Former security minister Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono seemed set today to win Indonesia's presidential election, a victory that would mark the first time the country's leader was removed by popular vote. Yudhoyono, a U.S.-trained former general who pledged to revive the economy and crack down on terrorism, was leading President Megawati Sukarnoputri 60% to 40%, with about half of the votes counted.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President B. J. Habibie withdrew his bid for election today after Indonesia's highest decision-making body refused to endorse his performance as chief executive. The secret ballot by the People's Consultative Assembly, which was the equivalent of a no-confidence vote, gave a huge boost to Habibie's main rival, Megawati Sukarnoputri, increasing her chances of being selected president by the assembly later today.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Abdurrahman Wahid announced Wednesday that he will hand over the day-to-day responsibility of running the troubled Indonesian government to his vice president, Megawati Sukarnoputri.
WORLD
October 22, 2002 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
It was a grim scene when President Megawati Sukarnoputri toured Legian Street in Bali. Hours earlier, a massive car bomb had exploded, destroying dozens of buildings, killing nearly 200 people and striking at the heart of one of Indonesia's most vibrant communities. Bodies remained buried in the rubble, and the smell of smoke hung in the air. Glass and debris from the gutted buildings were strewn everywhere. This was Indonesia's Sept.
WORLD
September 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Police in Indonesia shot blanks into the air and fired water cannons and tear gas at about 9,000 people protesting the candidacy of Jakarta's governor, a former general accused of rights abuses. Gov. Sutiyoso was, as expected, reelected by city councilors. Sutiyoso, who goes by one name, commanded the Jakarta garrison in 1996 when soldiers attacked the party offices of opposition leader Megawati Sukarnoputri, who is now president. Several dozen people were killed or abducted.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Critics of Megawati Sukarnoputri like to say she is merely a housewife with a famous name who enjoys gardening, shopping and watching cartoons. When she served as vice president, then-President Abdurrahman Wahid publicly called her "stupid." Other detractors dubbed her "Miniwati." But today her foes are calling her something else: president. Megawati, 54, the quiet, matronly daughter of Indonesia's founding president, Sukarno, was sworn in Monday as the nation's fifth head of state.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Abdurrahman Wahid announced Wednesday that he will hand over the day-to-day responsibility of running the troubled Indonesian government to his vice president, Megawati Sukarnoputri.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The life and political career of Megawati Sukarnoputri, Indonesia's new vice president, has been shaped in the shadow of her late father, President Sukarno. To many she is a mystery, an aloof and distant figure who lives a life of privilege and, in the Javanese manner, avoids confrontation. Critics question her intellect, and even supporters admit that her prominence rests on being the daughter of modern Indonesia's founder. But Indonesians do not doubt the strengths she brings to her job.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President B. J. Habibie withdrew his bid for election today after Indonesia's highest decision-making body refused to endorse his performance as chief executive. The secret ballot by the People's Consultative Assembly, which was the equivalent of a no-confidence vote, gave a huge boost to Habibie's main rival, Megawati Sukarnoputri, increasing her chances of being selected president by the assembly later today.
WORLD
September 19, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
President Megawati Sukarnoputri is not trying to be a strong leader -- and it shows. She avoids interviews, disdains news conferences and declines invitations to debate. Her public appearances are carefully scripted to avoid putting her on the spot. She has no presidential spokesperson. Her supporters call her "introspective." She calls herself an "ordinary housewife." Soon, Megawati will find out whether her detached style of leadership works in a democratic Indonesia.
WORLD
October 22, 2002 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
It was a grim scene when President Megawati Sukarnoputri toured Legian Street in Bali. Hours earlier, a massive car bomb had exploded, destroying dozens of buildings, killing nearly 200 people and striking at the heart of one of Indonesia's most vibrant communities. Bodies remained buried in the rubble, and the smell of smoke hung in the air. Glass and debris from the gutted buildings were strewn everywhere. This was Indonesia's Sept.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of social, economic and political upheaval, Indonesia is taking a giant step this week on its perilous path to democracy--the election of a president to govern the world's fourth most populous nation for the next five years. Who will win Indonesia's first contested presidential election since 1955, which will be held Wednesday, remains in doubt, and political maneuvering continues. Incumbent B. J.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
In an emotional address, presidential front-runner Megawati Sukarnoputri asked Indonesia's government to step aside, announcing that her party had been chosen in last month's elections to purge corruption from the crisis-riven nation. Although the results of the ballot have not been released, unofficial tallies endorsed by most major parties showed that Megawati's party won with 34% of the vote. The ruling Golkar Party placed second with 22%.
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