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Mel Mermelstein

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The modest, handmade Holocaust exhibit perched on the edge of Mel Mermelstein's Huntington Beach lumberyard is a far cry from the paneled, curated lobby of the Simon Wiesenthal Center on Los Angeles' Westside. But each, on its own scale, fulfills a promise on the part of the Jewish people never to forget the European genocide. And both provide settings for a cable-television movie based on Mermelstein's battle to preserve and defend the memory of the Holocaust.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest round in the decade-long legal battle between Auschwitz survivor Mel Mermelstein and revisionist historians who question the fate of Jews during World War II has gone to the revisionists, with no end to the dispute in sight. Last week, the attorney for Mermelstein, a Huntington Beach resident, withdrew the defamation portion of an $11-million lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court against the Institute for Historical Review, the Liberty Lobby and Willis Carto.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY
Despite the $90,000 settlement (see accompanying story), the tangled, never-ending litigation between Mel Mermelstein and his opponents drags on, according to Jeff Mauser, now Mermelstein's lead attorney. Eight different lawyers from seven firms have worked on the case, most on a pro bono basis (in "Never Forget," Dabney Coleman's character is the first of these lawyers).
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | From United Press International
A Los Angeles jury today awarded $5.25 million to a Nazi concentration camp survivor who claimed he was emotionally tortured by the taunts of a man who kept telling him the Holocaust never happened. The Superior Court jury deliberated only three hours and 45 minutes before finding that Swedish publisher Ditlieb Felderer should be held responsible for damages to Mel Mermelstein for libel and intentional infliction of emotional distress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest round in the decade-long legal battle between Auschwitz survivor Mel Mermelstein and revisionist historians who question the fate of Jews during World War II has gone to the revisionists, with no end to the dispute in sight. Last week, the attorney for Mermelstein, a Huntington Beach resident, withdrew the defamation portion of an $11-million lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court against the Institute for Historical Review, the Liberty Lobby and Willis Carto.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Over the past two weeks, more than 3,000 people in Orange County paid between $15 and $20 each to see "Shoah," a very long film about a very grim subject. According to Eric Levin, manager of the Balboa Cinema, the response to the nine-day run, which ended Thursday, was "exactly what we expected." Levin admitted that there had been some doubt by the distributer-New Yorker Films--that the highly praised exploration of the Holocaust would draw at the Newport Beach theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While a Holocaust movie may not be the kind of entertainment vehicle normally associated with the idea of "taking the show on the road," that is just what the star, subject and producer of "Never Forget" did recently to drum up interest. For, as the Washington Post noted, "Never Forget" is "not to be dismissed as just another Holocaust film." The made-for-television production, starring Leonard Nimoy, Dabney Coleman and Blythe Danner, airs Monday night and throughout the week on TNT.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY
Despite the $90,000 settlement (see accompanying story), the tangled, never-ending litigation between Mel Mermelstein and his opponents drags on, according to Jeff Mauser, now Mermelstein's lead attorney. Eight different lawyers from seven firms have worked on the case, most on a pro bono basis (in "Never Forget," Dabney Coleman's character is the first of these lawyers).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While a Holocaust movie may not be the kind of entertainment vehicle normally associated with the idea of "taking the show on the road," that is just what the star, subject and producer of "Never Forget" did recently to drum up interest. For, as the Washington Post noted, "Never Forget" is "not to be dismissed as just another Holocaust film." The made-for-television production, starring Leonard Nimoy, Dabney Coleman and Blythe Danner, airs Monday night and throughout the week on TNT.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The modest, handmade Holocaust exhibit perched on the edge of Mel Mermelstein's Huntington Beach lumberyard is a far cry from the paneled, curated lobby of the Simon Wiesenthal Center on Los Angeles' Westside. But each, on its own scale, fulfills a promise on the part of the Jewish people never to forget the European genocide. And both provide settings for a cable-television movie based on Mermelstein's battle to preserve and defend the memory of the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The modest, handmade Holocaust exhibit perched on the edge of Mel Mermelstein's lumberyard here is a far cry from the paneled, curated lobby of the Simon Wiesenthal Center on Los Angeles' Westside. But each, on its own scale, fulfills a promise on the part of the Jewish people never to forget the European genocide. And both provide settings for a cable television movie based on Mermelstein's battle to preserve and defend the memory of the Holocaust.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
A former cocaine trafficker and money launderer, describing how one federal law enforcement agency questioned him about information he already had given another, testified Thursday that interagency rivalries are crippling the nation's anti-drug efforts. Max Mermelstein told the Senate Judiciary Committee that the Drug Enforcement Administration questioned him about certain drug activities 10 months ago, unaware that he had provided the same information to the FBI three years earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
To Mel Mermelstein, the principle is simple: If someone pushes you, you push back. That's what he did in 1980 when a group called the Institute for Historical Review offered $50,000 for proof that Jews were killed in Auschwitz gas chambers during World War II. Mermelstein replied by supplying affidavits detailing the deaths of his mother, father, brother and two sisters at the hands of Nazis.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The modest, handmade Holocaust exhibit perched on the edge of Mel Mermelstein's lumberyard here is a far cry from the paneled, curated lobby of the Simon Wiesenthal Center on Los Angeles' Westside. But each, on its own scale, fulfills a promise on the part of the Jewish people never to forget the European genocide. And both provide settings for a cable television movie based on Mermelstein's battle to preserve and defend the memory of the Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
To Mel Mermelstein, the principle is simple: If someone pushes you, you push back. That's what he did in 1980 when a group called the Institute for Historical Review offered $50,000 for proof that Jews were killed in Auschwitz gas chambers during World War II. Mermelstein replied by supplying affidavits detailing the deaths of his mother, father, brother and two sisters at the hands of Nazis.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Over the past two weeks, more than 3,000 people in Orange County paid between $15 and $20 each to see "Shoah," a very long film about a very grim subject. According to Eric Levin, manager of the Balboa Cinema, the response to the nine-day run, which ended Thursday, was "exactly what we expected." Levin admitted that there had been some doubt by the distributer-New Yorker Films--that the highly praised exploration of the Holocaust would draw at the Newport Beach theater.
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