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Mel Torme

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NEWS
June 6, 1999 | DON HECKMAN and MYRNA OLIVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mel Torme, an inventive and gifted entertainer with a distinctive voice who became a favorite of several generations of music lovers, died Saturday morning. Torme's death came at UCLA Medical Center, attributed to complications of a stroke he suffered in 1996. He was 73. He was rushed to the hospital from his Beverly Hillshome about 1 a.m. after experiencing difficulty breathing. His family was by his side when he died a short time later.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bassist Bob Maize, 59, who played with Mose Allison, Herb Ellis and Billy Eckstine and toured with Sarah Vaughn and Mel Torme, has died. Maize died Nov. 20 at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank after suffering a heart attack at home, according to bassist Putter Smith. Born in San Diego on Jan. 15, 1945, Maize studied piano as a child before taking up the bass, which he played professionally at the age of 13 in a band led by his father.
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NEWS
June 8, 1999
Public funeral services for entertainer Mel Torme are scheduled at 11 a.m. today in the chapel of Westwood Village Memorial Park, 1218 Glendon Ave., with burial to follow. Although the chapel will be reserved for family and close friends, outside seating and loudspeakers will be provided for the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001
Steve Ettleson, 56, drummer and leading authority for drum manufacturers on artist relations, died Friday of injuries sustained when he was hit by an automobile in Studio City. Born in Chicago, Ettleson began playing drums as a teenager. After graduating from DePaul University, he found work as a musician playing for Ella Fitzgerald, Mel Torme, Juliet Prowse and Pearl Bailey.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The trouble with Mel Torme is that he has too many activities, and performs them all too efficiently. There are those he does to perfection (singing, composing), and those he does inordinately well--drumming, arranging, writing (newspaper and magazine articles, books). Everyone, you might say, should have such troubles. Back home in Los Angeles after a recent tour, Torme, who turns 63 Tuesday, was afraid to be interviewed because he had no complaints.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On July 23, just 16 days before he suffered a stroke from which he still is recovering, Mel Torme gave one of the finer performances of his career. "An Evening With Mel Torme," on A&E tonight, chronicles his Disney Institute appearance in a program that also includes segments from Torme's talks with young musicians enrolled in the performing arts division of the Orlando-based institute. Torme is in the absolute top of his musical form in the concert portions of the show.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | From Times wire services
Singer-writer Mel Torme might be nearing age 65 but that doesn't mean he has any plans of bowing out of show business. In fact, "1990 is the single biggest year in my life," Torme said. "I'd be crazy to even think about retiring." Torme's date at the Flathead Festival on Wednesday is sandwiched between performances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl and the London Symphony in England.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001
Steve Ettleson, 56, drummer and leading authority for drum manufacturers on artist relations, died Friday of injuries sustained when he was hit by an automobile in Studio City. Born in Chicago, Ettleson began playing drums as a teenager. After graduating from DePaul University, he found work as a musician playing for Ella Fitzgerald, Mel Torme, Juliet Prowse and Pearl Bailey.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
Eight singers, each with a particular and valid definition of jazz, crooned, wailed and scatted Wednesday evening at Hollywood Bowl, leaving one of the 11,782 patrons at the conclusion of the three-hour Jordache jazz at the Bowl concerts to remark, "I didn't know there were so many kinds of jazz." Indeed, the variety of jazz styles presented covered the hyphenate spectrum from Latin-jazz to jazz-rock. And in-between came plenty of scat and soul, with swing serving as the common denominator.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
"Broadly Broadway" was the title of an extravaganza presented Friday and Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl, with Mel Torme, Cleo Laine, and the L.A. Philharmonic conducted by John Dankworth. How Broadway was it? Not broad enough to take in Irving Berlin or Jerome Kern; a more apt title might have been "Largely Loesser" or "Greatly Gershwin." How broad was it?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | DON HECKMAN
Who's the best choice to star in a tribute to Mel Torme? Maureen McGovern, for sure, since she performed with Torme on dozens of concerts. So, too, Cleo Laine and John Dankworth, veteran jazz artists with a strong musical linkage to Torme. Add clarinetist Ken Peplowski and the trio that accompanied Torme in his last years, Torme's son, Steve March Torme, and bring in actor-magician Harry Anderson to host the show and you've got a pretty good package.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1999
The news of Mel Torme's passing (June 6) brought me back to the days of my youth in the South Side neighborhood in Chicago called South Shore. I remember our teenage social gang of boys and girls. Most have long left this Earth; but a few of us are still around. What we all have in common at this time are memories; memories of that little, younger kid on the block, Mel. The 8-year-old neighborhood celebrity who always hung around us big kids. The little kid who wrote songs and could never refrain from entertaining us whenever there was a piano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a renaissance man, beloved for his quirkiness and joie de vivre, friends and relatives of Mel Torme said Tuesday as hundreds gathered for his memorial service in Westwood. Torme, a multitalented musician best known for his jazz singing, died Saturday in Los Angeles at 73. The service at Pierce Bros. Westwood Village Memorial Park was attended by friends and Hollywood luminaries, as well as by fans who knew Torme only through his music.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
Public funeral services for entertainer Mel Torme are scheduled at 11 a.m. today in the chapel of Westwood Village Memorial Park, 1218 Glendon Ave., with burial to follow. Although the chapel will be reserved for family and close friends, outside seating and loudspeakers will be provided for the public.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | DON HECKMAN
Highlights of his recording career. "The Mel Torme Collection" (Rhino). Includes some of Torme's early recordings with his Mel-Tones, as well as his mid-1950s work with the Marty Paich Dek-tette. "The Torme Touch" and "Mel Torme Sings Fred Astaire" (Bethlehem). Both with the Paich Dek-tette, a group that blended perfectly with Torme's style of the mid-'50s. In the latter album, Torme makes a smooth connection with Astaire's subtle but inherent sense of swing.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | DON HECKMAN and MYRNA OLIVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mel Torme, an inventive and gifted entertainer with a distinctive voice who became a favorite of several generations of music lovers, died Saturday morning. Torme's death came at UCLA Medical Center, attributed to complications of a stroke he suffered in 1996. He was 73. He was rushed to the hospital from his Beverly Hillshome about 1 a.m. after experiencing difficulty breathing. His family was by his side when he died a short time later.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Slumped unhappily on a large couch in the Southwest-styled living room of his Beverly Hills home, Mel Torme--winner of two Grammys, composer of "The Christmas Song" and one of the world's best-known entertainers--is not in the best of moods. "I'm really embarrassed that I can't offer you anything," he says. "But no one's here to help out. I'm going through a divorce and everything is really screwed up."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1995 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A very familiar voice, equal part velvet and fine sandpaper, came on the phone one morning last week, with the enthusiasm of a veteran who seems to be both a night person and a morning person. When asked how he is, Mel Torme rebounds, without hesitation: "Never better." Torme's career, of late, bears him out.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On July 23, just 16 days before he suffered a stroke from which he still is recovering, Mel Torme gave one of the finer performances of his career. "An Evening With Mel Torme," on A&E tonight, chronicles his Disney Institute appearance in a program that also includes segments from Torme's talks with young musicians enrolled in the performing arts division of the Orlando-based institute. Torme is in the absolute top of his musical form in the concert portions of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Mel Torme is showing signs of recovery from the stroke he suffered Aug. 8, according to spokesperson Rob Wilcox. The 70-year-old singer has been removed from intensive care and taken off the respirator that has aided his breathing for the last week. Although some weakness, according to Wilcox, still remains in his left side, Torme is now able to sit up in a reclining chair. Not yet able to speak, he is nonetheless in good spirits and communicates via written notes and gestures.
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