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Melanoma

HEALTH
November 18, 2002 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
No one can question Dr. Donald Morton's tenacity. For 42 years, the medical director of the John Wayne Cancer Institute in Santa Monica has been working on a vaccine to prevent a relapse of malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. He began developing his vaccine, Canvaxin, in the early 1960s. Then working at the National Cancer Institute, he saw a patient whose cancer "just went away," even though it had spread to her liver and lungs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Peggy Maddox's life was saved by a movie and a cancer center named after a movie star. Maddox found a lump under her arm in the summer of 1983, a swollen lymph node characteristic of melanoma--the most deadly form of skin cancer. Surgeons near her Redondo Beach home removed the lump and pronounced her cured. By fall, she thought she had another lump, but the surgeons told her she was wrong, that she was OK.
HEALTH
March 5, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In a bid to make cancer immunotherapy more effective, researchers report they have succeeded in halting the progress of aggressive melanoma in its tracks - at least briefly - in seven patients treated with an army of cloned cancer-fighting immune cells. In one of those patients, the treatment resulted in complete remission of his metastatic melanoma and evidence that his immune system stands ready to fight any return of the cancer after three years. The study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, contributes to hopes that a tumor-fighting strategy called immunotherapy can slow, halt or even reverse the growth of a range of cancers - and do so with fewer dangerous side effects.
HEALTH
April 30, 2001 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In medicine, there is perhaps nothing as low-tech as a skin cancer examination. Doctors simply use their naked eyes to scan patients' bodies for signs of trouble. But a new high-tech method that enhances the ability of the human eye to identify the most serious form of skin cancer is starting to pop up in some dermatologists' offices, including at least three Los Angeles offices. Called digital microscopy, the technology could benefit individuals with an above-average risk of developing melanoma.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers Tuesday began the first experiments using human gene therapy to treat cancer, the National Institutes of Health announced. A 29-year-old woman and a 42-year-old man with advanced melanoma, a potentially lethal form of skin cancer, received transfusions of special cancer-killing cells removed from their own tumors, along with a gene that has been coded to produce a powerful anti-tumor toxin. The hope is that the mixture will destroy the patients' cancers.
HEALTH
June 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Two new drugs can significantly increase survival in patients with metastatic melanoma, the advanced and generally lethal form of skin cancer, researchers reported. Results were so dramatic in a trial of one of the drugs that the study was halted early, researchers reported Sunday at a Chicago meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Studies on both drugs were published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. Melanoma is among the most common cancers in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000 | ALEX MURASHKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mayor Paul Yost was given a scare last summer when a lesion on his chest was diagnosed as melanoma. Fortunately for Yost, who loves ocean sports and the sun, an examination by another doctor proved the diagnosis wrong. The quarter-inch growth was not a symptom of the disease caused primarily by excessive sun exposure and it was not cancerous. However, shortly afterward, Yost was given a second scare that made him look at melanoma as a serious threat to himself and others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
California is experiencing a "developing epidemic" of melanoma among Latinos, according to a study by USC researchers released Monday. Although the incidence is still much lower among Latinos than among whites, the researchers are alarmed because the greatest increase is in the rate of so-called thick tumors, which are much more likely to be lethal, according to a report in the journal Cancer.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
“Tanning kills,” warns Travis Kidner, a skin cancer surgeon, in a recent Times Op-Ed article advising against tanning beds. Still, tanning salons continue to attract customers, many of whom are young, white women undeterred by the dangerous risks. Science Now's Karen Kaplan reported : “The latest evidence comes from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a research letter published online Monday by JAMA Internal Medicine, they report that 29.3% of white high school girls went to an indoor tanning parlor at least once a year, and 16.7% went 'frequently' -- at least 10 times in a 12-month period.
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