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SCIENCE
July 25, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
TV sets, laptops, iPads and iPhones are modern society's instruments for increased productivity, social connectedness and entertainment after a long day's work. Ironically, a new study published in Molecular Psychiatry shows that these devices also contribute to an increase of major depressive disorder. The 24-hour society made possible by the advent of the electric light bulb has come at a significant biological cost. Light at night disrupts the body's natural circadian rhythms and has been linked to breast cancer, heart disease  and obesity.
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NEWS
October 25, 1994 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of constitutions some are well or ill adapted to summer, others are well or ill adapted to winter. --Hippocrates Several years ago when Army psychiatrist Dr. Matthew E. Levine was transferred to the northern Alaska outpost at Ft. Wainwright, he noticed a common complaint among his patients. During the long nights of winter, many of those who sought his help were suffering from severe depression.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As summer winds down, another new school year brings fresh notebooks, sharp pencils and — for many kids — a new cycle of sleep deprivation. With classes that start as early as 7 a.m. and buses that pull up long before sunrise, some 80% of American kids in grades 6 through 12 are falling short of sleep recommendations during the school year, according to research by the National Sleep Foundation, a sleep advocacy group. Overtired kids, studies suggest, struggle with depression.
NEWS
August 1, 1986 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The human circadian rhythm, a tyrant that dominates human existence, may be reset far more easily than previously believed, according to a new study in today's issue of Science magazine. The study comes at a time of increasing research into the mysterious, periodic cycles that govern life, and such studies are yielding new knowledge that is of potential benefit to millions of people who work non-traditional hours.
SCIENCE
February 17, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Riding in school buses in the early morning, then sitting in poorly lighted classrooms are the main reasons students have trouble getting to sleep at night, according to new research. Teenagers, like everyone else, need bright lights in the morning, particularly in the blue wavelengths, to synchronize their inner, circadian rhythms with nature's cycles of day and night. If they are deprived of blue light during the morning, they go to sleep an average of six minutes later each night, until their bodies are completely out of sync with the school day, researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute reported Tuesday in the journal Neuroendocrinology Letters.
HEALTH
February 19, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Heaven in a jar, my friend Carla calls it. Walking toward the skin-care counter, I wonder what's in the baby-blue cream she swears makes her feel as if she's had a "mini-face lift." The lavender-scented cream, the sales rep says, is made from a "patented copper peptide complex" used on burn victims' ravaged skin and diabetics' slow-healing wounds. If it can stimulate the production of collagen for them, he says, consider the power it could unleash on aging skin--a casualty of collagen breakdown.
HEALTH
May 12, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange, Special to The Times
When the occasional night spent walking the floor with a crying baby or rocking a toddler becomes a common occurrence, pediatricians often advise a little pharmaceutical help. A survey of 671 mostly suburban pediatricians showed that 75% had recommended sleeping medication for a child within the last six months. But few studies have examined the effectiveness of sleeping medicines in children, and no medication has been approved for them by the Food and Drug Administration.
HEALTH
October 25, 1999
For some people who suffer from insomnia, traditional treatments such as behavior therapy and prescription drugs produce undesirable side effects or don't work. This makes folk remedies and alternative health treatments for insomnia very popular. But do they work? Here is what some experts say: Warm milk: Milk contains the amino acid tryptophan, which is touted to alleviate stress and produce serotonin, a brain chemical that helps control sleep.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Anne Harnagel
Travelers to Las Vegas now can do more to protect their health and well-being than just skipping the smoke-filled casinos and gut-busting buffets. On Monday, the MGM Grand and real estate developer Delos will open 42 Stay Well rooms and suites in the hotel's main tower with at least a dozen health-and-wellness amenities. Among the rooms' features are special lighting to help reverse jet lag and regulate melatonin levels, advanced air purification and water filtration systems, vitamin C-infused water for showers, healthful room-service options and access to wellness, stress and weight management software developed by the Cleveland Clinic that guests can use for up to 60 days after their stay.
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