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NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Relaxation drinks aren't nearly as popular as energy drinks, but they're coming on strong, according to manufacturers showcasing their wares at the Natural Products Expo Friday in Anaheim. Energy drinks are hugely popular. But some have gotten a bad rap for potential side effects, especially in children and young adults, such as anxiety, heart palpitations and high blood pressure. That has opened the door to relaxation drinks, some of which may trigger their own set of health problems.
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NEWS
October 25, 1994 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of constitutions some are well or ill adapted to summer, others are well or ill adapted to winter. --Hippocrates Several years ago when Army psychiatrist Dr. Matthew E. Levine was transferred to the northern Alaska outpost at Ft. Wainwright, he noticed a common complaint among his patients. During the long nights of winter, many of those who sought his help were suffering from severe depression.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As summer winds down, another new school year brings fresh notebooks, sharp pencils and — for many kids — a new cycle of sleep deprivation. With classes that start as early as 7 a.m. and buses that pull up long before sunrise, some 80% of American kids in grades 6 through 12 are falling short of sleep recommendations during the school year, according to research by the National Sleep Foundation, a sleep advocacy group. Overtired kids, studies suggest, struggle with depression.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
TV sets, laptops, iPads and iPhones are modern society's instruments for increased productivity, social connectedness and entertainment after a long day's work. Ironically, a new study published in Molecular Psychiatry shows that these devices also contribute to an increase of major depressive disorder. The 24-hour society made possible by the advent of the electric light bulb has come at a significant biological cost. Light at night disrupts the body's natural circadian rhythms and has been linked to breast cancer, heart disease  and obesity.
NEWS
August 1, 1986 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The human circadian rhythm, a tyrant that dominates human existence, may be reset far more easily than previously believed, according to a new study in today's issue of Science magazine. The study comes at a time of increasing research into the mysterious, periodic cycles that govern life, and such studies are yielding new knowledge that is of potential benefit to millions of people who work non-traditional hours.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The links between sleep and cancer are now so many, you could build a chain. A new study has found that for men who suffer insomnia and unwelcome wakefulness, the risk of prostate cancer is greater than for those whose sleep is undisrupted. That research expands on a growing body of evidence that men and women whose sleep is short, broken or of poor quality are at higher risk of developing a wide range of cancers. Research has long linked overnight shift work -- and the circadian rhythm disruptions that are common with it -- as a risk factor for breast cancer and endometrial cancers in women.
HEALTH
May 12, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange, Special to The Times
When the occasional night spent walking the floor with a crying baby or rocking a toddler becomes a common occurrence, pediatricians often advise a little pharmaceutical help. A survey of 671 mostly suburban pediatricians showed that 75% had recommended sleeping medication for a child within the last six months. But few studies have examined the effectiveness of sleeping medicines in children, and no medication has been approved for them by the Food and Drug Administration.
HEALTH
October 25, 1999
For some people who suffer from insomnia, traditional treatments such as behavior therapy and prescription drugs produce undesirable side effects or don't work. This makes folk remedies and alternative health treatments for insomnia very popular. But do they work? Here is what some experts say: Warm milk: Milk contains the amino acid tryptophan, which is touted to alleviate stress and produce serotonin, a brain chemical that helps control sleep.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1998 | DENISE GELLENE
Advertiser: Longs Drug Stores Agency: W.B. Doner, Detroit Challenge: Establish Longs as a drugstore chain with a long-standing commitment to customers. The Ads: In six television spots, a befuddled man randomly seeks advice on toiletries and medication from his neighbors. "Spray or roll-on?" he asks two teenage boys. "Extra-strength or maximum strength?" He climbs up a ladder to ask a satellite-dish installer, "What's your opinion of melatonin?"
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