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Melissa Etheridge

ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1996 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During her three-hour concert on Sunday at the Los Angeles Sports Arena, Melissa Etheridge made one thing abundantly clear: A little of her music goes a long, long way. The Grammy-winning artist and her three-piece band stretched her flimsy blues-rock and folk-pop songs about as far as they could go, padding them with extended instrumental soloing, embellishing them with vocal histrionics and grandstanding with shameless self-indulgence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1996 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Fox's "Saturday Night Special" debuts tonight at 11, executive producer Roseanne will be using pop music as a first line of attack. For the show's six-week test, Roseanne has lined up some hot pop acts as ammunition in her challenge to "Saturday Night Live," the NBC series that has had a virtually exclusive weekend franchise for more than 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1995 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It used to be Janis Joplin. Now Bruce Springsteen has become the most frequently cited point of comparison for Melissa Etheridge. The Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter has taken her music to the heartland on her new album, "Your Little Secret," which employs the Boss' imagery and, on four songs, John Mellencamp's drummer , Kenny Aronoff , to evoke the grand sound and spirit of classic Midwest rock. Fair enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1995 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Melissa Etheridge looked a little like Dorothy surrounded by Munchkins as she stood on a makeshift stage in the middle of the audience during her Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre show on Sunday. Having snuck up to this spot while her band played on the main stage, Etheridge was swarmed by throngs of fans as she gave an acoustic, three-song interlude. It's a fitting image for the Leavenworth-raised rocker, who literally and figuratively is not in Kansas anymore.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
In calling her vastly popular current album "Yes I Am," Melissa Etheridge made a strong affirmation but left it open to interpretation just what she was affirming. Some of her fans, and many casual onlookers who knew of Etheridge only through her magazine interviews, probably figured "a lesbian" was the obvious completion to the title's unfinished thought. After all, Etheridge had publicly declared her sexual orientation eight months before the album was released in September, 1993.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
Melissa Etheridge is as exuberant on stage as a grinning kid who's rushing around to show everyone the great present she just opened. What she showed the audience at the Universal Amphitheatre on Tuesday was an indefatigable spirit and plenty of rip-roaring rock songs and confessional pop tunes. Her childlike enthusiasm notwithstanding, Etheridge has matured considerably since she released her debut album in 1988. The L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
** 1/2 MELISSA ETHERIDGE "Never Enough" Island On her first two albums, Etheridge used her throaty, turbo-powered pipes to play a woman oft hurt, deprived and betrayed. Love continues to mess her up on her latest (never enough of what--pain?). But she does find new angles on the same old story, even managing an ironic laugh over love unrequited ("Must Be Crazy for Me") and a coy chuckle over sexual politics ("Meet Me in the Back").
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