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Mello Roos Act Of 1982

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
The San Fernando City Council has scheduled two public hearings and one election to deal with three important issues: library funding, a hospital deal and leasing the old San Fernando police station. The first hearing, on the library issue, will be held at 6 p.m. Aug. 15 at the council chambers, 117 MacNeil St. in San Fernando. The council is expected to decide whether to approve Los Angeles County's proposal to create a special library district under the Mello-Roos Community Facilities Act.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | DAVID REYES
Residents of unincorporated Aliso Viejo have decided to sue the Orange County Transportation Corridor Agencies for using Mello-Roos tax revenue for the toll-road project and have set a fund-raising goal of $75,000 to help pay legal costs. Deborah L. Anderson, president of the Aliso Viejo Citizens Action League, said Wednesday the group believes that a class-action lawsuit would be filed in the fall.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | DAVID REYES
Residents of unincorporated Aliso Viejo have decided to sue the Orange County Transportation Corridor Agencies for using Mello-Roos tax revenue for the toll-road project and have set a fund-raising goal of $75,000 to help pay legal costs. Deborah L. Anderson, president of the Aliso Viejo Citizens Action League, said Wednesday the group believes that a class-action lawsuit would be filed in the fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
The San Fernando City Council has scheduled two public hearings and one election to deal with three important issues: library funding, a hospital deal and leasing the old San Fernando police station. The first hearing, on the library issue, will be held at 6 p.m. Aug. 15 at the council chambers, 117 MacNeil St. in San Fernando. The council is expected to decide whether to approve Los Angeles County's proposal to create a special library district under the Mello-Roos Community Facilities Act.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
"California isn't New England." How many times have Golden State investors recited that statement (or prayer) since the recession hit? The chief concern until recently has been over real estate prices. Now, the worries are shifting to an investment just as close to many folks' hearts: tax-exempt municipal bonds. With last week's bankruptcy filing of Connecticut's largest city, Bridgeport, people who own the bonds of other economically stressed cities, counties and states got a wake-up call.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
When Robert and Leah Morin bought their house in Rancho Santa Margarita two years ago, they knew some of their tax payments would help finance local roads, schools and fire stations. But, they said, they had no idea their 1991 property tax bill could climb to $3,620--four times what they paid in Mission Viejo. Steve and Martha Badger, who live near the Morins, tell a similar story about their property taxes quadrupling since they moved from an El Toro condominium two years ago.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When homeowners Susan and Marvin Wait joined three neighbors in this northern San Diego County town in suing their subdivision developer, the last thing they expected was to lose their very homes in the process. But that is the prospect they face. Not only was their lawsuit rejected out of hand, but they have been ordered to pay their developer's legal defense costs of $226,843. Split it three ways, and going to court for these people will have been by way of the cleaners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
Karen and Jim Tribbey had been living in their new, pale blue Cape Cod-style home in Palmdale about three months when they found out about the $11-million water bill. The young couple looked for two years before they found a nice home they could afford, even if it meant commuting nearly 100 miles a day to their jobs in Los Angeles, and even if, as Karen put it, "There's nothing out here."
REAL ESTATE
March 26, 1989 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
Barely a week ago, Janet and Kent Moser piled the last of their belongings into a rented trailer, turned in the keys to their Van Nuys apartment and headed northeast for the high desert to their new home in Palmdale. Recovering from the trauma of relocation, the Mosers and their four young children are experiencing a new sense of freedom. For Jonathan, 7, it means playing ball in a large back yard instead of a cramped parking lot.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When homeowners Susan and Marvin Wait joined three neighbors in this northern San Diego County town in suing their subdivision developer, the last thing they expected was to lose their very homes in the process. But that is the prospect they face. Not only was their lawsuit rejected out of hand, but they have been ordered to pay their developer's legal defense costs of $226,843. Split it three ways, and going to court for these people will have been by way of the cleaners.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
"California isn't New England." How many times have Golden State investors recited that statement (or prayer) since the recession hit? The chief concern until recently has been over real estate prices. Now, the worries are shifting to an investment just as close to many folks' hearts: tax-exempt municipal bonds. With last week's bankruptcy filing of Connecticut's largest city, Bridgeport, people who own the bonds of other economically stressed cities, counties and states got a wake-up call.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
When Robert and Leah Morin bought their house in Rancho Santa Margarita two years ago, they knew some of their tax payments would help finance local roads, schools and fire stations. But, they said, they had no idea their 1991 property tax bill could climb to $3,620--four times what they paid in Mission Viejo. Steve and Martha Badger, who live near the Morins, tell a similar story about their property taxes quadrupling since they moved from an El Toro condominium two years ago.
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