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Melvin Van Peebles

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun
Actor Melvin Van Peebles is walking quickly through the Renaissance sculpture gallery of the Walters Art Museum, being pursued by a tall black woman with a menacingly purposeful stride, who is being pursued by actor Melvin Van Peebles, who is being pursued by a tall black woman with a menacingly purposeful stride, who is ... Get the idea? If not, don't worry. There promises to be plenty more suitably odd and calculatedly impressionistic scenes in "Baltimore: Baadasssss Cinema Part 2."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2007 | Michael O'Sullivan, Washington Post
Say what you will about "Baadasssss!," actor-director Mario Van Peebles' dramatic re-creation of his filmmaker father Melvin's struggle to make the seminal 1971 film "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," that 2003 feature was limited in its scope.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Spike Lee was even born, a onetime San Francisco cable-car brakeman turned filmmaker named Melvin Van Peebles started breaking fresh ground in the way in which African-Americans were depicted on the screen.
NEWS
September 16, 2004 | Susan King
Man on Fire Denzel Washington, Dakota Fanning Fox, $30 Two-time Oscar winner Washington continues to grow and push himself as an actor; witness his exceptional performances this year as men on the edge, in "The Manchurian Candidate" and in this dark, often violent story set in Mexico City. Washington plays an alcoholic former special-ops assassin who finds redemption in the form of an endearing young girl (a winning Fanning) whom he is hired to guard.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2002 | OLIVIA WINSLOW, NEWSDAY
The two actors are awash in a stark light while everyone outside camera range is in shadows. Even amid the relative darkness, you can make out the young faces of eager students in Studio A in Hofstra University's Dempster Hall. But among students clad in jeans, sneakers and sweats, one figure casts a decidedly different aesthetic. He wears an orange turtleneck sweater and green sweatshirt under a tan wool suit--in deference to the chill in the cavernous studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Back in 1971 Melvin Van Peebles, already one of the first black directors to have had a film in general release with "Watermelon Man" the year before, scorched screens across America with "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," a surreal odyssey in which Van Peebles played a pimp on the lam after becoming involved in the killing of a brutal cop. The film's seeming incoherence, intended or otherwise, became expressive of Sweetback's predicament and induced identification with him.
NEWS
September 16, 2004 | Susan King
Man on Fire Denzel Washington, Dakota Fanning Fox, $30 Two-time Oscar winner Washington continues to grow and push himself as an actor; witness his exceptional performances this year as men on the edge, in "The Manchurian Candidate" and in this dark, often violent story set in Mexico City. Washington plays an alcoholic former special-ops assassin who finds redemption in the form of an endearing young girl (a winning Fanning) whom he is hired to guard.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2007 | Michael O'Sullivan, Washington Post
Say what you will about "Baadasssss!," actor-director Mario Van Peebles' dramatic re-creation of his filmmaker father Melvin's struggle to make the seminal 1971 film "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," that 2003 feature was limited in its scope.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Few people pay $1 million for therapy in their lifetime. Mario Van Peebles spent that in one fell swoop while making his film "Baadasssss!," an affectionate but unsentimental portrait of his father, director Melvin Van Peebles. "There's been some real healing," said Mario Van Peebles earlier this week as he continued a promotional tour for "Baadasssss!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Through his organization, the Center for the Study of Popular Culture, former radio talk-show host David Horowitz is planning to take out ads in movie industry trade publications this week branding Mario Van Peebles' "Panther" a "two-hour lie." In addition, Horowitz may protest the film's premiere Tuesday night or possibly its official debut Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Few people pay $1 million for therapy in their lifetime. Mario Van Peebles spent that in one fell swoop while making his film "Baadasssss!," an affectionate but unsentimental portrait of his father, director Melvin Van Peebles. "There's been some real healing," said Mario Van Peebles earlier this week as he continued a promotional tour for "Baadasssss!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Back in 1971 Melvin Van Peebles, already one of the first black directors to have had a film in general release with "Watermelon Man" the year before, scorched screens across America with "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," a surreal odyssey in which Van Peebles played a pimp on the lam after becoming involved in the killing of a brutal cop. The film's seeming incoherence, intended or otherwise, became expressive of Sweetback's predicament and induced identification with him.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2004 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
With more than 160 films from such diverse origins as Mauritania, Mali, Cuba, Kenya and Ghana, the Pan African Film and Arts Festival strives to reflect a broad spectrum of the community that surrounds it. Now in its 12th year and running mainly at the Magic Johnson Theatres at the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza, the festival also includes exhibitions of local fine arts, crafts and fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun
Actor Melvin Van Peebles is walking quickly through the Renaissance sculpture gallery of the Walters Art Museum, being pursued by a tall black woman with a menacingly purposeful stride, who is being pursued by actor Melvin Van Peebles, who is being pursued by a tall black woman with a menacingly purposeful stride, who is ... Get the idea? If not, don't worry. There promises to be plenty more suitably odd and calculatedly impressionistic scenes in "Baltimore: Baadasssss Cinema Part 2."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2002 | OLIVIA WINSLOW, NEWSDAY
The two actors are awash in a stark light while everyone outside camera range is in shadows. Even amid the relative darkness, you can make out the young faces of eager students in Studio A in Hofstra University's Dempster Hall. But among students clad in jeans, sneakers and sweats, one figure casts a decidedly different aesthetic. He wears an orange turtleneck sweater and green sweatshirt under a tan wool suit--in deference to the chill in the cavernous studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | RICHARD MAYNARD
I actually saw "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song" (1971) during its first run. I was a young white teacher in one of Philadelphia's several all-black, or mostly black, high schools; I also had the distinction of teaching one of the few accredited courses on black American history that year. "Sweet Sweetback" was in its third sold-out week at Philadelphia's Milgram Theater, one of its very few remaining downtown movie houses, and several of my students, mostly male, had seen it repeatedly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993 | LEO W. BANKS, Leo W. Banks is a free-lance writer based in Tucson
The cowpuncher's cracked-leather face showed a look of profound surprise. He stood at the side of a narrow dirt road in southeastern Arizona's Santa Rita Mountains and watched as the passenger vans rumbled past. One after another went by, each packed to the windows with black cowboys. When the long parade was complete, the man ambled through a storm of dust to a visitor's car, leaned into the open window and drawled: "What in the blue lightning is all that bidness?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | RICHARD MAYNARD
I actually saw "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song" (1971) during its first run. I was a young white teacher in one of Philadelphia's several all-black, or mostly black, high schools; I also had the distinction of teaching one of the few accredited courses on black American history that year. "Sweet Sweetback" was in its third sold-out week at Philadelphia's Milgram Theater, one of its very few remaining downtown movie houses, and several of my students, mostly male, had seen it repeatedly.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1998 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Melvin Van Peebles' "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," released in 1971, was an industry phenomenon. It was, noted New Yorker film critic Penelope Gilliat, "made by a black man for blacks . . . a boot in the face for moderates . . . a shock to the cinema." Though it has been called a revolutionary film that launched the so-called blaxploitation genre, it did not just spring out of thin air.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Through his organization, the Center for the Study of Popular Culture, former radio talk-show host David Horowitz is planning to take out ads in movie industry trade publications this week branding Mario Van Peebles' "Panther" a "two-hour lie." In addition, Horowitz may protest the film's premiere Tuesday night or possibly its official debut Wednesday.
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