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Memory Loss

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NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Silent strokes, small areas of dead brain tissue, may be responsible for memory loss in older people. A study, released recently in the journal Neurology , looked at the effects of those silent strokes on memory, as well as hippocampus size. A smaller hippocampus has been linked in some prior studies with memory loss. Participants included 658 people age 65 and older who had no signs of dementia. They took neuropsychological tests that measured language, information processing speed, memory and visual perception.
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SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Leave it to science to find a way to harsh the mellow of marijuana. A French research team has discovered a natural chemical brake that can tamp down the effects of THC, the main intoxicant in marijuana. They believe it could lead to ways to protect against memory loss, torpor and other side-effects better known as being stoned. “We have this built-in negative feedback mechanism, a brake” on cannabis intoxication, said University of Bordeaux neurobiologist Dr. Pier Vincenzo Piazza, principal author of a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
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NEWS
January 25, 2012
A study suggests that older men may be more vulnerable to developing mild cognitive impairment and memory loss compared with women. Researchers studied a group of 1,450 men and women age 70 to 89 who, at the start of the study, had no signs of cognitive problems. They underwent neurological evaluations at the beginning of the study and at 15-month intervals after that for an average 3.4 years. By the end of the study, 296 people had developed mild cognitive impairment. The condition increased with age and was seen more among men than women, except for those 85 to 89 years of age. Those with higher education levels or who were married had lower frequency of mild cognitive impairment.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By Alice Short
There's no doubt that public education has neglected World War I, with history teachers squeezing in a few lectures before launching into succeeding conflicts. Literature has been kinder to the Great War, offering many opportunities to remedy that oversight. Shell shock alone has been the subject of scores of novels (most notably Pat Barker's "Regeneration" trilogy) that remind us how WWI inextricably altered the trajectory - and the mythology - of the heroic soldier. Now Anita Shreve, the bestselling author of "The Pilot's Wife" and "The Weight of Water," has joined the ranks of writers who want to plumb the depths of shell shock's despair and disruptions.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
Not only has Brett Favre foreclosed on the idea that he might come back to the NFL, the retired star quarterback said he's now suffering memory loss. "I don't remember my daughter playing soccer, playing youth soccer, one summer," Favre said in an interview with WSPZ radio. "I don't remember that. I got a pretty good memory, and I have a tendency, like we all do, to say, 'Where are my glasses?' and they're on your head. "This was pretty shocking to me that I couldn't remember my daughter playing youth soccer, just one summer, I think.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Karin Klein, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
A new diet drug went on the market Tuesday. It's expensive and has to be taken the rest of the patient's life to continue to work. It comes with a long list of possible side effects, including common ones such as dizziness, fatigue and constipation, or rare ones such as hallucinations or memory loss. On average, it doesn't have much effect on a person's weight. So what is there to love about Belviq? Doctors have been clamoring for another “tool” they can use in the fight against obesity, and if Belviq, which suppresses appetite, is only a lightweight hammer of a tool, even those are of use to some people.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
NEWS
September 9, 2010
High doses of B vitamins can reduce shrinkage of the brain that is frequently a precursor of Alzheimer's disease, British researchers reported Wednesday. In the best circumstances, the supplements reduced shrinkage by as much as 50%, and researchers hope that this may mean that the vitamins can delay the onset of Alzheimer's. A longer trial is now being planned to determine if that is the case. The results are all the more remarkable because of the widely publicized failures of many experimental Alzheimer's treatments.
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
People who develop Alzheimer's disease in middle age might be at risk of getting misdiagnosed, according to a new study published online Monday in the journal Neurology. That's because many patients' first symptoms don't include the memory loss associated with the degenerative disease. Researchers in Barcelona, Spain, looked at the brain tissues of 40 people who had suffered from early-onset Alzheimer's disease - a form of the degenerative disorder that can begin to affect patients well before they've reached their golden years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | NICK GREEN
An elderly man who suffered from memory loss set off from his Ventura County home in his car to visit relatives in Los Angeles, got lost and resurfaced some time later--in Las Vegas. A disoriented Oxnard woman in her late 60s wandered away from her home at night and was picked up by police. Officers took her paranoid delusions seriously and interrogated worried family members when they arrived to retrieve her.
SPORTS
November 18, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Brett Favre doesn't have a son, so there won't be anyone to carry on his legacy as one of the best quarterbacks in NFL history. But even if he did have a son, the youngster still wouldn't be following in the footsteps of his future Hall of Fame father. Not if Favre could help it anyway. "If I had a son, I would be real leery of him playing [football]," Favre told Matt Lauer on NBC's "Today Show" in an interview that aired Monday. "In some respects, I'm almost glad I don't have a son because of the pressures he would face.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
Not only has Brett Favre foreclosed on the idea that he might come back to the NFL, the retired star quarterback said he's now suffering memory loss. "I don't remember my daughter playing soccer, playing youth soccer, one summer," Favre said in an interview with WSPZ radio. "I don't remember that. I got a pretty good memory, and I have a tendency, like we all do, to say, 'Where are my glasses?' and they're on your head. "This was pretty shocking to me that I couldn't remember my daughter playing youth soccer, just one summer, I think.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Amy Wallen
After reading 27-year-old Max Perry's Op-Ed article " Poor Memory? Forget it " in my old-fashioned print newspaper, I laughed both at his irony and his naivete. He is right that we older folk say, "Shoot me when my memory loss gets too bad. " But, then he says, "Go with the flow. " That it's not "cataclysmic. " Dear Max, let me explain this memory loss we are so willing to be shot over. I see your point, it's just a cocker spaniel whose name we forgot. If we had dementia we would think that dog was one of our kids.
SCIENCE
July 17, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
It's a story that is captivating people on both sides of the Atlantic. On Feb. 28, the Desert Sun newspaper reported , a man was discovered unconscious in a Motel 6 in Palm Springs. He was taken to the hospital, where he awoke in the emergency room.  Four pieces of identification the man carried indicated that his name was Michael Thomas Boatwright. But the man couldn't remember his name and didn't recognize his own face on his California ID.  He believed his name was Johan Ek. He spoke only Swedish.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Karin Klein, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
A new diet drug went on the market Tuesday. It's expensive and has to be taken the rest of the patient's life to continue to work. It comes with a long list of possible side effects, including common ones such as dizziness, fatigue and constipation, or rare ones such as hallucinations or memory loss. On average, it doesn't have much effect on a person's weight. So what is there to love about Belviq? Doctors have been clamoring for another “tool” they can use in the fight against obesity, and if Belviq, which suppresses appetite, is only a lightweight hammer of a tool, even those are of use to some people.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Got burning questions about how memories are made and stored in the brain? You are in luck: Two prominent neuroscientists are taking questions from the public about memory and the brain on Google Chat today and you can watch it live, here. The hangout will run from 11:30 a.m. to noon PDT on Thursday. The scientists will discuss recent discoveries that show memories aren't formed and permanently lodged in just one part of the brain, but rather rely on an extensive network of pathways throughout different regions of the brain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cmdr. John Cochrane, skipper of the destroyer Kinkaid, which crashed into a merchant ship by the Strait of Malacca, testified Tuesday that he suffered a memory loss in the days after the collision and provided an erroneous account of the accident to an investigating admiral. Cochrane told an admiral in a written statement immediately after the crash--which killed the navigation officer and injured 17 sailors--that he knew the Kinkaid would reach the busy channel at 5 on the morning of the crash.
SCIENCE
March 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists have identified a substance in the brains of mice that causes memory loss, which could be a target for drugs to treat patients with Alzheimer's disease. Using genetically engineered mice that developed memory loss similar to Alzheimer's victims', the researchers discovered that it was caused by a form of the amyloid beta protein.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
In what could lead to a new group of targets for the treatment of memory loss disorders like Alzheimer's disease, scientists have identified a group of molecules that appear to be required for the transition from a short-term to a long-term memory. The molecules, called nuclear receptors, belong to a class of proteins called transcription factors that play a central role in gene expression. The proteins bind to DNA and help regulate which genes are expressed at a given time. Previous research had suggested that nuclear receptors were somehow involved in memory formation, and the new study confirms that the loss of these proteins prevents long-term memories from forming.
SPORTS
May 9, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Former NFL receiver Cris Carter says he put "bounties" on opposing players when he played in the league. Carter made the admission Tuesday night on "Hill and Schlereth," a show on ESPN Radio. "I put bounties on guys," Carter said. "If a guy tries to take me out, a guy takes a cheap shot on me? I put a bounty on him right now!" Carter said the big difference between what he did and what the New Orleans Saints did in their bounty system is that Carter didn't want opponents injured.
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