Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMemory Loss
IN THE NEWS

Memory Loss

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | ROBERT J. TROTTER, Trotter is a free - lance writer based in Washington and specializing in the behavioral sciences. and
As we get older, our memories fade. In most of us there is a gradual decline in memory--from 6% to 10% per decade--beginning at about age 30. But others suffer from a loss greater than expected, and are diagnosed as having age-associated memory impairment. This condition is not nearly as dramatic as senile dementia and Alzheimer's disease, but it nonetheless affects the person's day-to-day life.
Advertisement
HEALTH
November 20, 2006 | Barron H. Lerner, Special to The Times
Today, someone suffering from forgetfulness is immediately assumed to have Alzheimer's disease. But it was only a few decades ago that famed actress Rita Hayworth's Alzheimer's was persistently misdiagnosed. One of World War II's most popular pin-up girls, Hayworth began having trouble remembering her lines during the 1960s, while in her 40s. She drank heavily at times, and her fellow actors largely suspected alcohol as the cause. So did her doctors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1991 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two researchers from the UC San Diego School of Medicine have identified the anatomical structures involved in memory, drawing for the first time "a wiring diagram" of how facts and events are recorded by the human brain. In an article in today's edition of the journal Science, researchers Larry Squire and Stuart Zola-Morgan pull together a decade's research--much of it their own--to describe how the parts of the brain's medial temporal lobe memory system functions to record a memory.
SPORTS
January 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
Mickey Mantle, whose major league career was noted for home runs and late nights, has checked into the Betty Ford Center for treatment of alcohol abuse. Mantle, 62, a Hall of Famer since 1974, entered the clinic about three weeks ago and is expected to complete treatment next month, according to his business manager, Roy True. His Friday statement said treatment was for "a 43-year battle with alcohol abuse."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1994 | BRIAN RAY BALLOU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury awarded $630,000 Friday to a Laguna Beach nurse who contended she suffered brain damage stemming from a collision with another motorist at a Laguna Hills intersection four years ago. An Orange County Superior Court jury also found that Rosemary Palmer was 20% responsible for the crash, which means that her award will be reduced by that amount, to $504,000. The money is to be paid by the other driver's insurance company.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A highly touted but still controversial drug called tacrine can partially reverse memory loss and reduce dementia in some patients with early stages of Alzheimer's disease, a new study has found. The study results reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. are the strongest yet to suggest that drugs can ease the effects of Alzheimer's, which afflicts at least 2.5 million Americans and perhaps as many as 4 million, most over the age of 65.
HEALTH
March 5, 2001 | JUDY FOREMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After creeping corpulence, perhaps the most common complaint of aging is what the experts politely call "benign" memory loss, and the rest of us, less politely, sometimes call CRS, for Can't Remember (you know what).
NEWS
January 18, 1996 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James B. McDougal, President Clinton's former investment partner and the central figure in the Whitewater saga, suffers from severe mental problems and no longer has a reliable memory of pivotal events in the complex scandal involving the President and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, a psychiatrist testified Wednesday.
HEALTH
November 17, 2008 | Melissa Healy
It is one of those jokes neurologists regularly share when the subject turns to patients complaining of memory lapses: When you can't remember where you left your glasses, there's probably no need to worry. When you can't remember you wear glasses you're probably in trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1994 | NANCY SHULINS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For much of her life, Sadie had it all: good health, a fine home, a family that adored her. But with old age came senility, robbing her, bit by bit, of her personality. Once known for her hearty appetite, she picked at her food, sometimes wandering off in the middle of a meal. She began getting lost in the only home she'd ever known. A lifelong extrovert, she sat for hours staring at the wall. Test after test came back normal. But the signs were all there: memory loss, confusion, inappropriate outbursts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|