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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1990 | Compiled from Times Wire and Staff Reports
Men who frequently sunbathe nude using ultraviolet lamps substantially increase their risk of developing a rare and potentially fatal genital cancer, according to a new study published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study shows that the penis is particularly susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of sunlight, and it advised men who are frequently exposed to ultraviolet radiation in tanning salons, on the beach, or for therapeutic purposes to protect themselves.
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NEWS
October 23, 2012
Robotic surgery was initially developed to target prostate cancer - and today four in five prostectomies are performed by this revolutionary system, according to the National Cancer Institute. Although robotics - the pioneering da Vinci Surgical System in particular - is today employed to treat a wide range of cancers, it remains an especially effective way to deal with the specific challenges of prostate cancer. Robotic surgery has also been shown to minimize recovery time, pain and side effects.
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NEWS
June 21, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using Father's Day to drive home his message about improving men's health, President Clinton on Saturday released the first portion of almost $60 million in prostate cancer research grants. Clinton said the largest-ever federal research awards for finding better treatments for the disease will pay for "new studies to determine the cause of prostate cancer [and] develop new methods of prevention and detection.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A regular exercise program is good for pretty much every segment of the population, including homeless men. A small study of homeless men living in Copenhagen found that playing street soccer for 12 weeks improved their cardiovascular health, blood pressure, body fat percentage and cholesterol. Although pedometer readings revealed that the study participants averaged more than 10,000 steps a day, they lacked intense physical activity that can improve the cardiovascular system. The majority of the men said they regularly smoked cigarettes and marijuana, and many also drank alcohol.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fatalities ranged from the oldest man, an 80-year-old who collapsed suddenly in the middle of having sex, to the youngest, a 48-year-old, who experienced chest pains while having sex and later died in a hospital emergency room.
HEALTH
June 18, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY
Men's Health Network http://www.menshealthnetwork.org Background: The Men's Health Network was founded in 1991 by a group of counselors, educators and others interested in men's issues, and has since formed alliances with groups devoted to conditions such as prostate cancer, male depression and AIDS. Its Web site advertises the network's activities and acts as a resource guide for consumers.
NEWS
January 2, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Norman Schwarzkopf's prostate cancer almost wasn't detected. "When you are a general, the doctors don't tend to do a thorough digital rectal exam," says the leader of America's Gulf War forces. Even though he had none of the symptoms, Schwarzkopf had been doing a lot of reading about prostate cancer. So, during a hospital visit for a different purpose, he asked a urologist to do a more thorough exam. The doctor felt a tiny lump.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
Cynicism, mistrust and anger toward others are "the toxic core" of Type A behavior--the precise forms of hostility that place many workaholics at increased risk of heart disease and early death, new research suggests. The research, conducted at Duke University and discussed Monday at an American Heart Assn. forum here, found that lawyers who fit a broad definition of hostility while they were in law school were more than four times more likely than others to die during the ensuing 25 years.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He could be any 20-year-old taking a college exam, straining with concentration, pausing over difficult questions. His smile is engaging, his manner is one of awkward innocence. It is only the topic that is jarring--not because he is talking about sex, but because he is talking about sexual practices that he knows could eventually lead to his death. He engages in them anyway, simultaneously informed and oblivious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1996
Sydney Poitier has it, James Earl Jones was tested for it but didn't have it and this week, it was Los Angeles City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas' turn to see if he had it. "It" is prostate cancer and the 41-year-old councilman got tested to draw attention to the African American Men's Health Project, which provides African American men over 40 with tests for prostate cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure--all for just $5.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
How does this play in Peoria? Rep. Aaron Schock (R-Ill.) is taking an unconventional approach to promote a new healthy lifestyles campaign, flaunting his chiseled chest on the cover of the new Men's Health magazine, which declares him "America's fittest congressman. " Schock, who represents central and western Illinois in the House, already had the distinction of being the first U.S. congressman born in the 1980s. The Huffington Post declared him "hottest freshman. " Now, Men's Health says that he's the first politician to ever appear shirtless in the magazine.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
Attention 20-year-old men: Look at the people around you. Are most of them women? If so, you're in for a longer life (statistically speaking). On the other hand, if the men outnumber the women, you might want to consider moving somewhere like Hartford, Ga.; St. Joseph, Minn.; Bryn Mawr, Pa.; or Dugway, Utah (all cities where more than two-thirds of residents are female). It may sound crazy, but the preponderance of males in places where men live when they reach marriageable age influences how long they will live, according to a study published in the August issue of the journal Demography.
HEALTH
October 17, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
YOU might call it melancholy on steroids -- a muscular mixture of fast-driving, heavy drinking, hard-charging cussedness. For perhaps 3 million American men yearly, that's the plotline for depression. For almost 24,000 men yearly, the final scene is suicide. Often, there is no cry for help, no river of tears, no abyss of sadness. Just a violent, tragic bolt from the blue. In the United States, a man is four times more likely than a woman to commit suicide, according to government statistics.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | From Reuters
A study has found that Viagra does not reduce blood flow to the heart in some men with heart disease, a conclusion that should ease some safety concerns about the popular sexual potency pill, Mayo Clinic researchers reported Tuesday. The study involved men with stable heart disease who were not taking nitrates, drugs used to treat angina.
HEALTH
November 12, 2001 | TIMOTHY GOWER, Massachusetts freelance writer Timothy Gower can be reached by e-mail at tgower@mediaone.net. The Healthy Man runs the second Monday of the month
During the past tumultuous months, many people in this country have found themselves confronted by a new demon: the blues. In the week after the Sept. 11 attacks, a staggering 71% of Americans said they felt depressed, according to the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. Those rates have gradually declined in subsequent surveys, but one theme has remained constant: Women were much more likely than men to say they felt depressed.
HEALTH
October 8, 2001 | TIMOTHY GOWER
I came across a piece of information the other day that pricked up my ears. Men in this country younger than 65 are nearly twice as likely as women to suffer some degree of hearing loss, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Among senior citizens the difference between the sexes is less dramatic, though males are still more likely than females to experience audio difficulties. Wives and girlfriends often complain that their men are lousy listeners.
HEALTH
June 15, 1998
The following article was reprinted with permission from Men's Health magazine, December 1997 * Like it or not men, your dad is the most perfect glimpse you will ever have into your future. He gave you his genes, his habits, his outlooks, and then ran ahead of you by 30 years to test them on the battlefield of life. Here are 10 questions you should ask your father so that you can have a healthy, satisfying future. 1. Did you care about your health when you were younger?
HEALTH
June 8, 1998
* National Institute on Aging Information Center P.O. Box 8057, Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8057 (800) 222-2225 Call or write to receive a list of free publications. * American Diabetes Assn. 1660 Duke St., Alexandria, VA 22314 (800) 342-2383 * American Dietetic Assn. 216 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 800, Chicago, IL 60606-6995 (800) 366-1655 for referral to a registered dietitian or access to prerecorded messages.
HEALTH
August 6, 2001 | BARRIE CASSILETH, Barrie Cassileth, PhD, is chief of integrative medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. She can be reached at BarrieC@Juno.com. Her column appears the first Monday of the month
If you've been in a health food store recently, you could not have missed the numerous promotions for antioxidants. For many of these claims, there are no scientific data. For others, study results produce conflicting information. That's why the National Cancer Institute's newly announced plan for the largest prostate cancer prevention study ever undertaken is so important.
HEALTH
June 18, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY
Men's Health Network http://www.menshealthnetwork.org Background: The Men's Health Network was founded in 1991 by a group of counselors, educators and others interested in men's issues, and has since formed alliances with groups devoted to conditions such as prostate cancer, male depression and AIDS. Its Web site advertises the network's activities and acts as a resource guide for consumers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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