Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMen Health
IN THE NEWS

Men Health

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1998 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With his surgeons announcing that his cancer had not spread, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony walked out of the hospital Thursday, three days after an operation to remove his prostate gland.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
OK, so he took Viagra. But a man accused of philandering after using the impotence drug is a sickly widower whose thrice-married companion just wants his money, his lawyer said. "Have you ever heard of an inanimate object breaking up your marriage? You might as well name a chair," said Raoul Felder, the lawyer for Francis Bernardo, 70. Roberts Burke, 61, has filed a $2-million lawsuit alleging that Viagra broke up her longtime relationship with Bernardo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1998 | Times medical writer Thomas H. Maugh II
The drug Proscar has been shown for the first time to reduce the need for surgery to treat enlarged prostate glands. In a study of 3,040 men with prostate enlargement reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine, only 5% of those who took Proscar required prostate-reduction surgery compared to 10% of those who got dummy pills. Proscar, known generically as finasteride, is one of the most widely prescribed prostate drugs.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Black men are two to three times more likely to die of prostate cancer than white men, and doctors can't explain why or reduce the risks. Calling the figures "a disgraceful tragedy," the American Cancer Society and the group 100 Black Men of America urged a national attack on prostate cancer. At the top of the agenda is increasing federal research.
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
A quarter of men have high levels of a growth protein linked to a greater likelihood of prostate cancer, says a new study that may point scientists toward ways to reduce the incidence of the cancer. Dr. Michael Pollak of McGill University, who coauthored the study with Harvard University scientists, said if the new research is confirmed, doctors may one day use the protein to better predict which men will one day get cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Los Angeles County public health officials announced Wednesday that an outbreak of syphilis primarily among gay men appears to be subsiding. Dr. James Haughton, medical director of public health for Los Angeles County, said that despite increased surveillance and testing, just one new case of syphilis has been reported in the last six weeks. "We are hoping the outbreak has peaked and is waning now," he said.
HEALTH
April 23, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Al Lakin says he was thinking of his two teenage sons when he volunteered to take part in two clinical studies of male hormonal contraceptives. "I look at the options I had at their age," said Lakin, 48. "It was to keep my pants zipped." Lakin, a computer software consultant from Tarzana, believes men should assume more responsibility for the consequences of sex. And that by doing so, they provide their partners with more options for preventing pregnancy.
HEALTH
June 15, 1998 | TONY TAYLOR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I swim to consciousness. I know immediately what has happened, but it's unimportant, not worth dwelling on. The only thing worth dwelling on is my back as I lie serenely waiting for the distorted images in front of me to firm up into reality. It takes--how long?--two minutes? Ten? Doesn't matter. I think I'm in the recovery room, but it looks a lot like the holding room--who cares?
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A study raised questions about a widely used prostate cancer radiation therapy in cases where there is a high risk the disease will spread. Researchers at Harvard Medical School said a nearly four-year study involving 1,872 men found poorer outcomes for high-risk patients treated by implanting radioactive "seeds" in the gland, compared with those treated more aggressively. The study, published in Chicago in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|