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Men S Central Jail

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
For months, Anthony Brown fooled his jailers into believing that he was just another prisoner inside Men's Central Jail. In fact, the 45-year-old armed robber was working for the FBI on a highly sensitive investigation of the Los Angeles County jails. He took down the names of sheriff's deputies who he alleged were dirty. He reported tales of violent abuse of inmates at the hands of jailers. He even ensnared a deputy in a phone smuggling scheme that resulted in a criminal conviction.
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OPINION
March 20, 2013
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has spent the better part of the last decade debating what to do when they close Men's Central Jail, an aging facility near Union Station that was once described by a federal judge as "not consistent with human values. " The supervisors have argued over whether to build new jails to replace it or whether to refurbish existing ones and expand their capacity. Because they've failed to decide, Men's Central has remained open far longer than it should have.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001 | DALONDO MOULTRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three inmates were convicted of first-degree murder Tuesday in a 1998 Los Angeles jailhouse killing that authorities believe was a hit ordered by the Mexican Mafia. Christian Knighten, Frankie Lujan and Dennis Ray Morris were convicted of killing Robert Tiernan, 32, while Tiernan and the defendants were locked up at the Men's Central Jail. The three defendants were also found guilty, along with inmate Red Culbertson, of conspiracy to commit murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2013 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Assessor John Noguez, who has been in jail since his October arrest on two dozen corruption charges, finally made bail on Friday. Noguez is accused of taking $185,000 in bribes from Ramin Salari, a prominent property tax consultant and generous Noguez campaign fundraiser. In return for the cash, Noguez is alleged to have lowered property tax bills for some of Salari's wealthy clients. Both Noguez and Salari pleaded not guilty following their Oct. 17 arrest, and have vigorously denied any wrongdoing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Two Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies who were allegedly attacked by other deputies at a Christmas party last year have accused the department of encouraging an atmosphere of lawlessness and violence among its jail employees, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. The allegations stem from an altercation at a Montebello banquet hall last December when about half a dozen deputies allegedly assaulted two others and punched a female deputy who tried to intervene in the face. The deputies who were described as the aggressors worked on the third floor of Men's Central Jail, where they were believed to have formed an aggressive clique known to flash gang-like hand signs.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
It seems that Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca just can't catch a break, at least not when it comes to the county's jail system. The Board of Supervisors created a civilian oversight commission to look into allegations of violence and abuse inside the lockups. Federal officials are conducting their own probe into deputy misconduct. And on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court let stand a Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that found Baca can be sued in connection with jailhouse violence. Dion Starr is suing Baca, alleging that the sheriff showed "deliberate indifference" to complaints of violence inside the Men's Central Jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2011 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Even as a sergeant shouted, "Stop hitting him! Stop hitting him!," Deputy Marcos Stout continued punching an inmate in the head. Then, with the inmate on the concrete floor, Stout landed his knee on the man's skull. Lawyers for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department described the deputy's actions as "callous and brutal behavior toward a helpless and unresisting person. " Though Stout's excessive force was egregious enough to get him fired, prosecutors did not charge him with a crime — but not because they concluded that the violence wasn't criminal, according to interviews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies aren't taking any chances with convicted killer Benjamin Pedro Gonzales. Considered one of the most dangerous inmates in the California penal system, Gonzales arrived this week from Corcoran State Prison to face murder charges in the 1989 stabbing death of a 22-year-old Cerritos College student. Authorities have spent about $25,000 to remodel cells for him in the Men's Central Jail, where he is housed by himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writers
Sheriff's Deputies David Aviles and Salvador Esquivel Jr. started their careers as rookies on the "3000 floor" of Los Angeles County Men's Central Jail, a place reserved for the most dangerous inmates. Along the dimly lighted hallway of cramped cells on the floor, suspected killers and notorious gang leaders peer out from behind the bars. Many face a lifetime in prison and have learned to survive in a confined and ruthless world. They fashion makeshift knives from toothbrushes and sharp spears from ripped magazines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Federal authorities are investigating allegations of inmate beatings and other misconduct by deputies in Los Angeles County jails, with FBI agents going so far as to sneak a cellphone to an inmate to get reports from inside, according to law enforcement sources. The inquiries include allegations that deputies broke an inmate's jaw and other facial bones and beat another man for two minutes while he was unconscious. Their investigation created a flap recently when Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department brass discovered that an inmate inside Men's Central Jail was an FBI informant equipped with a cellphone he was believed to be using to communicate with agents on the outside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2013 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Two embattled Los Angeles County sheriff's captains have retired, including one suspected of funneling secret information to an alleged drug trafficker and another who allegedly protected brutal and dishonest jailers. Suspicions were sparked about Bernice Abram, who ran the sheriff's Carson station, after she was overheard on a federal narcotics wiretap talking to an alleged Compton drug trafficker. Abram, who had more than 150 deputies under her command, was overheard alerting a member of the Original Front Hood Crips to planned sheriff's operations in his area.
OPINION
October 8, 2012 | By Richard Drooyan and Miriam Aroni Krinsky
After nine months of investigating the inappropriate use of force by deputies in Los Angeles County jails, the Citizens' Commission on Jail Violence arrived at an inescapable conclusion. As the commission's report put it: "The sheriff did not pay enough attention to the jails. " The commission, which we served as general counsel and executive director, found that there has been a persistent pattern of inappropriate force used against inmates. And although concerns had been raised repeatedly, Sheriff Lee Baca did not begin to address the problem until the violence made headlines last year.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The citizen's commission created to investigate allegations of violence inside the Los Angeles County jail system held its final meeting Friday. Though there were few surprises in what investigators reported, the findings were still very disturbing. For example, investigators for the Los Angeles County Citizens Commission on Jail Violence found that the Sheriff's Department has known about problems with deputy cliques in and outside the jails for years but failed to address them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi and Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Investigators for a blue-ribbon commission issued a searing critique of Sheriff Lee Baca and his top assistants, accusing them of fostering a culture in which deputies were permitted to beat and humiliate inmates, cover-up misconduct and form aggressive deputy cliques in the L.A. County jails. Baca was described as an out-of-touch boss who was "insulated … from force issues and other bad news" by his underlings. Members of his command staff, investigators said, tolerated a "code of silence" and failed to control and thoroughly investigate deputies' force against inmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles County jail inmate who allegedly stole a pair of jail pants during his release found himself back behind bars a day later when two off-duty law enforcement officers spotted him wearing them, authorities said. Marcus Garcia, 22, of Saugus was running through a Wal-Mart parking lot in the 25400 block of The Old Road in Stevenson Ranch on Tuesday when an off-duty L.A. County sheriff's deputy and an off-duty L.A. County custody assistant, who were not named, noticed him and called 911, according to the Santa Clarita Valley sheriff's station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
For months, Anthony Brown fooled his jailers into believing that he was just another prisoner inside Men's Central Jail. In fact, the 45-year-old armed robber was working for the FBI on a highly sensitive investigation of the Los Angeles County jails. He took down the names of sheriff's deputies who he alleged were dirty. He reported tales of violent abuse of inmates at the hands of jailers. He even ensnared a deputy in a phone smuggling scheme that resulted in a criminal conviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
In a searing self-critique, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca acknowledged that he was out of touch about problems in his jails and had failed to implement important reforms that could have minimized deputy brutality against inmates. Faced with an FBI investigation into the jail system and mounting criticism over his handling of the crisis, Baca said in a long interview with The Times that his command staff has at times left him in the dark about the jails' woes. "I wasn't ignoring the jails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County jailers are more likely to use force against mentally ill inmates than other prisoners, according to a new Sheriff's Department report that acknowledges the lockups need specially trained staff to reduce the violence. Roughly a third of the 582 deputy use-of-force cases in the jail system last year involved inmates with mental health histories, according to an analysis released Tuesday. About 15% of the jail's 15,000 inmates are classified as mentally ill. The numbers provide a more detailed picture of the confrontations between deputies and inmates, an issue that has sparked intense scrutiny over the last few months and prompted a heated debate Tuesday between Sheriff Lee Baca and some L.A. County supervisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
A federal grand jury has demanded that Los Angeles County sheriff's officials turn over all correspondence they have had with a county commission created to examine allegations of excessive force by deputies in the county jails, according to a sheriff's email obtained by The Times. The subpoena suggests that federal authorities, in the midst of a widespread investigation of the jails, are expanding their probe to include allegations unearthed by the commission. In recent months, that county panel has heard testimony from current and former sheriff's supervisors who have publicly alleged that top managers fostered a culture of abuse inside the jails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | Steve Lopez
If you're ever unfortunate enough to find yourself accused of assaulting a law enforcement officer, good luck. When it comes down to your word against the officer's, and there are no impartial witnesses, you may end up in a jumpsuit even if you're innocent. But if you're an inmate accused of assaulting a jailer, you're in a considerably worse jam. And in the opinion of the ACLU of Southern California, your best chance of avoiding prosecution may be evidence that is routinely concealed by the L.A. County Sheriff's Department and the district attorney's office.
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