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Men S Central Jail

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001 | DALONDO MOULTRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three inmates were convicted of first-degree murder Tuesday in a 1998 Los Angeles jailhouse killing that authorities believe was a hit ordered by the Mexican Mafia. Christian Knighten, Frankie Lujan and Dennis Ray Morris were convicted of killing Robert Tiernan, 32, while Tiernan and the defendants were locked up at the Men's Central Jail. The three defendants were also found guilty, along with inmate Red Culbertson, of conspiracy to commit murder.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 20, 2013
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has spent the better part of the last decade debating what to do when they close Men's Central Jail, an aging facility near Union Station that was once described by a federal judge as "not consistent with human values. " The supervisors have argued over whether to build new jails to replace it or whether to refurbish existing ones and expand their capacity. Because they've failed to decide, Men's Central has remained open far longer than it should have.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
For months, Anthony Brown fooled his jailers into believing that he was just another prisoner inside Men's Central Jail. In fact, the 45-year-old armed robber was working for the FBI on a highly sensitive investigation of the Los Angeles County jails. He took down the names of sheriff's deputies who he alleged were dirty. He reported tales of violent abuse of inmates at the hands of jailers. He even ensnared a deputy in a phone smuggling scheme that resulted in a criminal conviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2013 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Assessor John Noguez, who has been in jail since his October arrest on two dozen corruption charges, finally made bail on Friday. Noguez is accused of taking $185,000 in bribes from Ramin Salari, a prominent property tax consultant and generous Noguez campaign fundraiser. In return for the cash, Noguez is alleged to have lowered property tax bills for some of Salari's wealthy clients. Both Noguez and Salari pleaded not guilty following their Oct. 17 arrest, and have vigorously denied any wrongdoing.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
It seems that Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca just can't catch a break, at least not when it comes to the county's jail system. The Board of Supervisors created a civilian oversight commission to look into allegations of violence and abuse inside the lockups. Federal officials are conducting their own probe into deputy misconduct. And on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court let stand a Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that found Baca can be sued in connection with jailhouse violence. Dion Starr is suing Baca, alleging that the sheriff showed "deliberate indifference" to complaints of violence inside the Men's Central Jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2009 | Richard Winton
A Los Angeles County jail inmate was charged with murder Wednesday in the beating death of his cellmate, authorities said. Matthew Rochelle, 21, allegedly attacked Cedric Walton, 55, Aug. 31 in the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department's modern Twin Towers jail facility, which often houses inmates with mental health or medical issues, prosecutors said. "It was a beating death. One inmate basically killing his cellmate with blunt-force trauma," said Sheriff's Homicide Lt. Liam Gallagher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
The tiny jail on Catalina Island is hardly Alcatraz. Just ask Frank Carrillo. The pro golfer turned jewel thief couldn't believe his luck when he was moved out of his bleak Men's Central Jail cell in downtown L.A. and allowed to do his time on the sunny tourist isle. But things got even cushier when he met a Los Angeles County sheriff's captain interested in shaving a few strokes off his golf game. Carrillo said Capt. Jeff Donahue escorted him in a patrol Jeep to a hilltop golf course last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies aren't taking any chances with convicted killer Benjamin Pedro Gonzales. Considered one of the most dangerous inmates in the California penal system, Gonzales arrived this week from Corcoran State Prison to face murder charges in the 1989 stabbing death of a 22-year-old Cerritos College student. Authorities have spent about $25,000 to remodel cells for him in the Men's Central Jail, where he is housed by himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Two Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies who were allegedly attacked by other deputies at a Christmas party last year have accused the department of encouraging an atmosphere of lawlessness and violence among its jail employees, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. The allegations stem from an altercation at a Montebello banquet hall last December when about half a dozen deputies allegedly assaulted two others and punched a female deputy who tried to intervene in the face. The deputies who were described as the aggressors worked on the third floor of Men's Central Jail, where they were believed to have formed an aggressive clique known to flash gang-like hand signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles County jail inmate who expressed concerns about his safety was strangled in his cell weeks after a judge asked that sheriff's officials reevaluate the man's custody arrangements, according to court records and interviews. Sheriff's officials said they had no records showing they had received the judge's request or reassessed Jonathan Najera's housing situation. The possibility that the judge's request never reached sheriff's officials and the lack of records to clarify what happened represent a potentially dangerous flaw in communication between jail and court officials, inmate advocates say. Records show the 20-year-old inmate did move to another cell on the same floor a day after the judge's request, but authorities suspect that move was the result of routine jail flow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2013 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Two embattled Los Angeles County sheriff's captains have retired, including one suspected of funneling secret information to an alleged drug trafficker and another who allegedly protected brutal and dishonest jailers. Suspicions were sparked about Bernice Abram, who ran the sheriff's Carson station, after she was overheard on a federal narcotics wiretap talking to an alleged Compton drug trafficker. Abram, who had more than 150 deputies under her command, was overheard alerting a member of the Original Front Hood Crips to planned sheriff's operations in his area.
OPINION
October 8, 2012 | By Richard Drooyan and Miriam Aroni Krinsky
After nine months of investigating the inappropriate use of force by deputies in Los Angeles County jails, the Citizens' Commission on Jail Violence arrived at an inescapable conclusion. As the commission's report put it: "The sheriff did not pay enough attention to the jails. " The commission, which we served as general counsel and executive director, found that there has been a persistent pattern of inappropriate force used against inmates. And although concerns had been raised repeatedly, Sheriff Lee Baca did not begin to address the problem until the violence made headlines last year.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The citizen's commission created to investigate allegations of violence inside the Los Angeles County jail system held its final meeting Friday. Though there were few surprises in what investigators reported, the findings were still very disturbing. For example, investigators for the Los Angeles County Citizens Commission on Jail Violence found that the Sheriff's Department has known about problems with deputy cliques in and outside the jails for years but failed to address them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi and Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Investigators for a blue-ribbon commission issued a searing critique of Sheriff Lee Baca and his top assistants, accusing them of fostering a culture in which deputies were permitted to beat and humiliate inmates, cover-up misconduct and form aggressive deputy cliques in the L.A. County jails. Baca was described as an out-of-touch boss who was "insulated … from force issues and other bad news" by his underlings. Members of his command staff, investigators said, tolerated a "code of silence" and failed to control and thoroughly investigate deputies' force against inmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles County jail inmate who allegedly stole a pair of jail pants during his release found himself back behind bars a day later when two off-duty law enforcement officers spotted him wearing them, authorities said. Marcus Garcia, 22, of Saugus was running through a Wal-Mart parking lot in the 25400 block of The Old Road in Stevenson Ranch on Tuesday when an off-duty L.A. County sheriff's deputy and an off-duty L.A. County custody assistant, who were not named, noticed him and called 911, according to the Santa Clarita Valley sheriff's station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
For months, Anthony Brown fooled his jailers into believing that he was just another prisoner inside Men's Central Jail. In fact, the 45-year-old armed robber was working for the FBI on a highly sensitive investigation of the Los Angeles County jails. He took down the names of sheriff's deputies who he alleged were dirty. He reported tales of violent abuse of inmates at the hands of jailers. He even ensnared a deputy in a phone smuggling scheme that resulted in a criminal conviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2012 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
A retired Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department commander who publicly accused department brass last year of ignoring his warnings about jail abuse is now at the center of an internal investigation. According to the Sheriff's Department, the investigation was launched to determine if anyone had stopped Cmdr. Robert Olmsted from correcting the problems he had seen with excessive force and jailer cliques. But Olmsted is accusing sheriff's officials of rigging the probe to scapegoat him and insulate high-ranking officials from culpability, saying he has seen them protect people in the past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
A former sheriff's deputy at the center of an FBI probe inside the L.A. County jail system implicated himself and other jail employees in four cases of improper force against inmates, according to a letter written by Sheriff Lee Baca. Baca said the admission prompted him to create a 35-person task force of seasoned investigators and other experts to examine a growing number of allegations of deputy misconduct in the jails. The former deputy, Gilbert Michel, alleged criminal misconduct by other deputies, and investigators could forward their findings to the district attorney's office for possible prosecution, a sheriff's official said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
A federal grand jury has demanded that Los Angeles County sheriff's officials turn over all correspondence they have had with a county commission created to examine allegations of excessive force by deputies in the county jails, according to a sheriff's email obtained by The Times. The subpoena suggests that federal authorities, in the midst of a widespread investigation of the jails, are expanding their probe to include allegations unearthed by the commission. In recent months, that county panel has heard testimony from current and former sheriff's supervisors who have publicly alleged that top managers fostered a culture of abuse inside the jails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | Steve Lopez
If you're ever unfortunate enough to find yourself accused of assaulting a law enforcement officer, good luck. When it comes down to your word against the officer's, and there are no impartial witnesses, you may end up in a jumpsuit even if you're innocent. But if you're an inmate accused of assaulting a jailer, you're in a considerably worse jam. And in the opinion of the ACLU of Southern California, your best chance of avoiding prosecution may be evidence that is routinely concealed by the L.A. County Sheriff's Department and the district attorney's office.
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