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Menahem Golan

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BUSINESS
April 15, 1989
Pathe Agrees to Deal: Pathe Communications, formerly Cannon Group, agreed to turn over its rights to two motion pictures to 21st Century Film Corp., headed by Menahem Golan, former Cannon chairman, in lieu of providing $160 million of financing for future film production by Golan. The films in the deal are the completed "Mack the Knife" and "Phantom of the Opera," which is in production. Separately, Pathe said it would not meet the deadline today for an interest payment to its bondholders.
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NEWS
August 29, 1998 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the adage is true that the ultimate Hollywood art form is the deal, then the maneuvering to get "Spider-Man" to the big screen will never hang in the Louvre. As the biggest superhero character left unfilmed since the blockbuster "Batman" made the genre popular again, "Spider-Man" has been widely touted as moviedom's hottest property.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989 | Shauna Snow, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Menahem Golan, chairman of the board of Cannon Entertainment, has been selected to receive an award from the Israeli Union of Performing Artists honoring his work as a director and producer of motion pictures. Golan, who took the helm at Cannon in 1979, will be saluted at a March 15 celebration (marking the Israeli group's 10th anniversary) in Jaffa, Israel. Golan recently directed Raul Julia in Cannon's upcoming "Mack the Knife," (based on "The Threepenny Opera").
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1996
I practically choked on my breakfast bagel when I read in "Deep in the Heart of Russia" (by Carol J. Williams, June 16) that "Anna Karenina" "is the West's first film to be shot entirely on location in Russia." Back in 1991, I worked on not one but two films produced by Menahem Golan that were shot entirely in Moscow ("Hit the Dutchman" and "Killer Instinct") under his L.A.-based 21st Century Films banner. Golan also produced "Dance Macabre" and a remake of "Crime and Punishment"; Roger Corman made "Haunted Symphony"; Just Betzler did a film on the 1991 coup called "Three Days in August"; Greydon Clark directed a pair of thrillers in St. Petersburg; and last-year's well-reviewed "Mute Witness" was just released on video.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1988 | Craig Modderno \f7
In Paul Mazursky's upcoming "Moon Over Parador," crazed producer Menachem Fein throws a temper tantrum on a movie set. Could it be a spoof of bombastic Menahem Golan, co-owner of Cannon Films? "It is Menahem," Mazursky told us. Will Golan get upset by the unflattering portrayal? "Why would he get angry? He would like it." Golan, who hasn't seen the movie, told us he was "flattered but disappointed" over his caricature. "I wish I was offered the role," Golan said, amused.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1987
To blame the messenger for a troubling message may be a phenomenon as old as the Bible. Nonetheless, I must take exception to Cannon Films co-chairman Menahem Golan's characterization of the Hollywood Reporter's coverage of his company in its time of crisis as "nasty smears" (Outtakes, by Pat H. Broeske, May 17). If Golan can document this assertion, let him do so; if not, let him apologize. Additionally, Golan's belief that a "trade" newspaper has a responsibility to be "positive" is regrettably misguided.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1996
I practically choked on my breakfast bagel when I read in "Deep in the Heart of Russia" (by Carol J. Williams, June 16) that "Anna Karenina" "is the West's first film to be shot entirely on location in Russia." Back in 1991, I worked on not one but two films produced by Menahem Golan that were shot entirely in Moscow ("Hit the Dutchman" and "Killer Instinct") under his L.A.-based 21st Century Films banner. Golan also produced "Dance Macabre" and a remake of "Crime and Punishment"; Roger Corman made "Haunted Symphony"; Just Betzler did a film on the 1991 coup called "Three Days in August"; Greydon Clark directed a pair of thrillers in St. Petersburg; and last-year's well-reviewed "Mute Witness" was just released on video.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992
Welkos and Silverstein were just about right on the money (pun intended) with their article on the unemployment situation in the motion picture industry. However, regarding the quote from Menahem Golan, chairman of 21st Century Films, anyone in this business knows that Golan is no friend of labor. He said, 'If I did a $3- or $4-million picture there (Moscow), it would be like a $30- to $40-million picture here (the States). When you pay extras $60 to $100 a day here, you pay only $1 (a day)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992
Welkos and Silverstein were just about right on the money (pun intended) with their article on the unemployment situation in the motion picture industry. However, regarding the quote from Menahem Golan, chairman of 21st Century Films, anyone in this business knows that Golan is no friend of labor. He said, 'If I did a $3- or $4-million picture there (Moscow), it would be like a $30- to $40-million picture here (the States). When you pay extras $60 to $100 a day here, you pay only $1 (a day)
BUSINESS
April 15, 1989
Pathe Agrees to Deal: Pathe Communications, formerly Cannon Group, agreed to turn over its rights to two motion pictures to 21st Century Film Corp., headed by Menahem Golan, former Cannon chairman, in lieu of providing $160 million of financing for future film production by Golan. The films in the deal are the completed "Mack the Knife" and "Phantom of the Opera," which is in production. Separately, Pathe said it would not meet the deadline today for an interest payment to its bondholders.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Italian financier Giancarlo Parretti's design for building a Hollywood movie empire moved forward Monday with the announcement that Menahem Golan has resigned as an executive of Cannon Group. Golan and Yoram Globus headed the Los Angeles-based film company from 1979 until the Parretti group took control last April. Golan will set up a new independent production company with about $160 million from Cannon under a four-year agreement, the company said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989 | Shauna Snow, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Menahem Golan, chairman of the board of Cannon Entertainment, has been selected to receive an award from the Israeli Union of Performing Artists honoring his work as a director and producer of motion pictures. Golan, who took the helm at Cannon in 1979, will be saluted at a March 15 celebration (marking the Israeli group's 10th anniversary) in Jaffa, Israel. Golan recently directed Raul Julia in Cannon's upcoming "Mack the Knife," (based on "The Threepenny Opera").
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1988 | Craig Modderno \f7
In Paul Mazursky's upcoming "Moon Over Parador," crazed producer Menachem Fein throws a temper tantrum on a movie set. Could it be a spoof of bombastic Menahem Golan, co-owner of Cannon Films? "It is Menahem," Mazursky told us. Will Golan get upset by the unflattering portrayal? "Why would he get angry? He would like it." Golan, who hasn't seen the movie, told us he was "flattered but disappointed" over his caricature. "I wish I was offered the role," Golan said, amused.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
Outtakes reported a few weeks ago that Cannon Films was shooting a small portion of "Ben, Bonzo and Big Bad Joe" (a.k.a. "My African Adventure") in South Africa, with black comic Jimmy Walker. That film is now shooting in Zimbabwe. We heard that Cannon was again shooting in South Africa. Cannon co-chairman Menahem Golan responded to our query: "We've already talked about this--haven't we? I stand by what I said the first time."
BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Italian financier Giancarlo Parretti's design for building a Hollywood movie empire moved forward Monday with the announcement that Menahem Golan has resigned as an executive of Cannon Group. Golan and Yoram Globus headed the Los Angeles-based film company from 1979 until the Parretti group took control last April. Golan will set up a new independent production company with about $160 million from Cannon under a four-year agreement, the company said.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1988 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Cannon Group's major European investor, Giancarlo Parretti, will take control of the beleaguered movie studio under an agreement disclosed Monday. Cannon's film activities are to be placed in a separate division called Cannon Entertainment under Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus, the company's longtime top officers. But, under the agreement, Golan and Globus would no longer jointly control the company with the Parretti group although they would remain stockholders and directors.
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