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Mengele

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NEWS
February 15, 1985 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
A former Army private told Thursday of seeing a man identified as Dr. Josef Mengele, the elusive Angel of Death of the Auschwitz concentration camp, while assigned to guard duty at a camp for German prisoners in July, 1945. Walter Kempthorne, a 59-year-old retired engineer from Riverside, told reporters at the Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies that the encounter occurred while he was serving as a guard at a Counter Intelligence Corps prison for war criminals in the Rhineland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
To paint a portrait of European Jewry between the world wars, novice filmmaker Isaac Hertz mined the childhood memories of two dozen interview subjects and matched their recollections to well-chosen (and unidentified) archival footage. His documentary "Life Is Strange" is unfocused yet intermittently effective as an illustrated oral history. An American who professes an affinity to his grandparents' generation, the director spoke with a seemingly random assortment of people who survived or escaped the Holocaust.
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NEWS
May 8, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The government Tuesday offered a $1 million reward for the capture of Dr. Josef Mengele, the notorious "Angel of Death" who performed experiments on inmates at the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz. The reward brings to at least $2.3 million the amount offered for the capture of Mengele, who has been reported hiding in Paraguay and would be 73 if still alive. The Paraguayan government denies he is in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Tod Goldberg, Goldberg's books include "Living Dead Girl," "Fake Liar Cheat" and "Simplify."
It's rarely wise to compare someone to a legend. Inevitably, somebody is going to question the math. Yet as you read the first 200 pages of "Pain Killers," Jerry Stahl's second novel to follow the adventures of Manny Rupert -- a private eye with a drug problem -- it's difficult not to conjure up the work of the late Gregory Mcdonald and his creation Irwin "Fletch" Fletcher.
NEWS
February 7, 1985 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
Atty. Gen. William French Smith ordered an investigation Wednesday into the whereabouts of Dr. Josef Mengele, the "Angel of Death" of the Auschwitz concentration camp, and into whether U.S. authorities had any contact with him after World War II. "Nothing would make us happier than to locate him and help bring him to justice," said Stephen S. Trott, assistant attorney general in charge of the Justice Department's criminal division.
BOOKS
February 9, 1986 | Gerry Graber, Graber recently taught a course at UCLA entitled "Nazism Re-evaluated." and
In a telling phrase, written in 1953, the English historian Gerald Reitlinger described Heinrich Himmler's background as "depressingly normal." Why "depressingly"? Because presumably we should prefer to see a list of huge traumas peppering the background of the major Nazi war criminals, which might account for their subsequent aberrant behavior. In Joseph Mengele we have another example of what Hannah Arendt once called the "banality" of those who committed crimes against humanity.
NEWS
February 1, 1985
West Germany has increased to $300,000 the reward for information leading to the capture of Dr. Joseph Mengele, the infamous Nazi war criminal. Mengele has been sought by West Germany since 1959 in the deaths of thousands of prisoners at the Auschwitz death camp. The reward increase, from $15,000, follows the commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Many Nazi hunters believe that Mengele is living in Paraguay under the protection of the government of Gen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
To paint a portrait of European Jewry between the world wars, novice filmmaker Isaac Hertz mined the childhood memories of two dozen interview subjects and matched their recollections to well-chosen (and unidentified) archival footage. His documentary "Life Is Strange" is unfocused yet intermittently effective as an illustrated oral history. An American who professes an affinity to his grandparents' generation, the director spoke with a seemingly random assortment of people who survived or escaped the Holocaust.
NEWS
July 22, 1985 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
The most arresting truth of fate--or chance, as some wish to call it--is how it intrudes in the lives of everyday people. It affects the weak and strong, the good and bad, the young and old. For some it pops up again and again, often in the strangest ways. Often in the strangest places. Fate can mean romance. Joan Smith was a barroom singer in St. Paul, Minn., when Ray Kroc walked in. He liked her voice, the way her fingers tickled the ivories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1992
Reports in The Times ("Secret Files Yield Data on Nazi Mengele," Feb. 11) tell of West German and Argentina knowingly assisting Dr. Josef Mengele in the 1950s. The supply of passports and other documentation to one of the worst war criminals of Nazi Germany illustrates the complicity of top bureaucrats in the decades-long cover-up of the whereabouts of this war criminal. The current upswings of neo-fascist groups in eastern Germany and Austria again indicate a willingness or lack of resolve of German leaders to attack fascism head-on.
WORLD
September 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Israeli agents who kidnapped Nazi mastermind Adolf Eichmann from Argentina in 1960 also found the notorious death camp doctor Josef Mengele but let him get away, one of the operatives said. Rafi Eitan, 81, an Israeli Cabinet minister, said he and other Mossad agents found Mengele living in Buenos Aires. But they decided that trying to nab him would risk sabotaging the capture of Eichmann. Mengele died in 1979 in Brazil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. Leslie Lukash, 86, a medical examiner who helped identify the remains of Nazi war criminal Josef Mengele and studied the deaths of people who disappeared during Argentina's Dirty War, died of lymphoma Aug. 16 at a hospital on Long Island, N.Y. Chief medical examiner for New York's Nassau County for more than 40 years, Lukash was also a founder and former president of the National Assn. of Medical Examiners.
NEWS
March 5, 2006 | Ryan Lucas, Associated Press Writer
For years afterward, photographer Wilhelm Brasse saw them in his dreams -- emaciated Jewish girls herded naked in front of his camera at Auschwitz. Eventually, the dreams stopped. But he never took pictures again. "I didn't return to my profession, because those Jewish kids, and the naked Jewish girls, constantly flashed before my eyes," he said. "Even more so because I knew that later, after taking their pictures, they would just go to the gas."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2003 | From the Washington Post
John T. Mengel, an electronics pioneer whose team took the first space photograph and who later became one of NASA's first employees, died of pneumonia Oct. 22 at a nursing home in Davis, Calif. He was 85. Mengel was head of the electronic instrument division at the Naval Research Laboratory on March 7, 1947, when he and his team shot the first photo ever taken from space at an altitude greater than 100 miles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Does one of the most notorious war criminals of the Nazi era deserve his day in court and the right to a committed defense attorney? That question is asked and answered with a resounding, and disturbing, affirmative by the makers of "Nothing but the Truth," a courtroom thriller depicting the imagined prosecution of Josef Mengele, the Auschwitz doctor who sent as many as 400,000 people to their deaths and performed brutal experiments on the living.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In the latest front of Holocaust-related litigation, a federal class-action suit was filed Wednesday on behalf of survivors of Nazi death camps, alleging that Bayer AG, the giant German-owned chemical and pharmaceutical company, participated in cruel medical experiments by the infamous Dr. Josef Mengele.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | The Washington Post
Genetic material taken from a body thought to be that of Auschwitz concentration camp doctor Josef Mengele matches samples from living Mengele relatives, proving after a seven-year investigation that the long-sought "angel of death" died in 1979, according to non-governmental sources familiar with a German inquiry. The results of the probe are to be released officially in Frankfurt next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1985 | United Press International
The Sunday Times of London reported that fugitive Nazi war criminal Josef Mengele is living fairly openly in Paraguay, dividing "his time between a jungle hotel and a heavily guarded log cabin at a military base." The newspaper said its information came from Domingo Laino, a leading Paraguayan political exile currently living in Argentina and from a senior diplomat at the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires. Mengele, now 73, was last spotted in Paraguay eight months ago, the newspaper said.
NEWS
September 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Noted forensic scientist Ellis Kerley, who was called upon for such important cases as the identification of Nazi war criminal Josef Mengele and the investigation of the Challenger space explosion, has died. He was 74. Kerley, a resident of Lake San Marcos for the last four years, died last week of complications from leukemia, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported Monday. "He had a great deal of love for the cadavers he dealt with," said his wife, Mary Adams Kerley.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Josef Mengele, the infamous Auschwitz death camp doctor who became a symbol of the Holocaust, slipped through American hands even though he was held in two U.S. POW camps for at least six weeks in 1945, Justice Department Nazi hunters acknowledged Thursday. But their 197-page report on the investigation that confirmed Mengele's death in Brazil in 1979 said they found no evidence that U.S. intelligence agencies or other U.S. authorities knowingly gave assistance to the notorious "Angel of Death."
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