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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Estrogen replacement therapy can reduce the risk of death in post-menopausal women as much as 37%, especially among those with high risk factors for heart disease, but the benefits decline for some women with prolonged use, according to a report in the June 19 New England Journal of Medicine. The results were obtained from the Nurses' Health Study, begun in 1976, of more than 121,000 women.
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NEWS
April 7, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Standard doses of the sex hormone estrogen strengthen brain activity in older, post-menopausal women, Yale University researchers said Tuesday, offering the best evidence yet that the commonly prescribed hormone alters the neural circuits involved in human memory. By testing the kind of working memory involved in everyday verbal and visual tasks, the researchers quickly detected significant differences in neural activity between women who were taking the hormone and those who were not.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
For the first time, doctors appear to have restored fertility in a menopausal woman by reimplanting into her abdomen several pieces of her ovaries that had been removed and frozen when she was younger. The experimental procedure, performed on an American ballerina, could lead to greatly expanded reproductive options for women by allowing them to become pregnant years or decades later in life than is now possible, doctors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Pushing the frontiers of pregnancy, researchers at USC have found that women older than 50 who are past menopause stand a good chance of giving birth to healthy babies with the help of sophisticated embryo donation techniques. In a study published in this week's issue of the British journal the Lancet, the USC researchers report that of 14 post-menopausal women between 50 and 55, eight became pregnant.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | JAN ZIEGLER, AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE SERVICE
Should a woman take estrogen when her body stops making it? The question stirs intense debate among health experts. It also provokes confusion and worry among the millions of American women who must decide whether estrogen replacement therapy is right for them. When a woman reaches menopause, her levels of both estrogen and progesterone decline, and her ovaries stop releasing eggs. Menopause "officially" starts with a woman's final menstrual period.
HEALTH
June 28, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
When warnings first emerged two years ago about the safety of taking hormones for menopausal symptoms, many women began turning to alternative treatments, such as herbs, for relief. Now researchers are asking whether the most common of those herbs, black cohosh, is any safer. A plant native to North America, black cohosh has long been an American folk remedy for menopausal discomforts such as hot flashes.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Worried that women in the United States may be turning too quickly to treatments for symptoms of menopause, a panel of medical experts suggested that those without severe problems simply wait out the changes their bodies were undergoing. Evidence links sleep disturbances to menopause, which is associated with hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness, a National Institutes of Health panel said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 23, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Menopause is a midlife milestone for all women that, in the eyes of some scientists, is as important a signature of the human species as a large brain and an opposable thumb. It may have ensured the evolutionary triumph of the human family, they say, by freeing older women to care for their grandchildren. Yet others have argued that it amounts to no more than hot flashes, brittle bones and barren years.
HEALTH
July 5, 2004 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Sharon Pruhs was only 42 years old when she began experiencing menopausal symptoms. "I remember exactly where I was when I experienced my first hot flash," she recalls. "I was standing at the card catalog at the library." The Los Angeles librarian figured, "Here we go." But she didn't actually reach menopause until she was 54. Her experience is not uncommon. Gradual hormonal and physical changes typically start years before menopause, which begins at a woman's final menstrual period.
HEALTH
February 28, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Colleen Dawmen had been plagued for years by severe hot flashes that would wash over her dozens of times a day and awaken her, dripping with sweat, three or four times a night. "I'd get so overwhelmed by this furnace-like heat that I felt like my head was going to explode," says the 51-year-old nurse. She didn't want to take hormones, but black cohosh and progesterone cream had failed to curb her symptoms. "I was at the mercy of these hot flashes," she says.
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