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Menopause

NEWS
August 11, 1992 | JAN ZIEGLER, AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE SERVICE
Should a woman take estrogen when her body stops making it? The question stirs intense debate among health experts. It also provokes confusion and worry among the millions of American women who must decide whether estrogen replacement therapy is right for them. When a woman reaches menopause, her levels of both estrogen and progesterone decline, and her ovaries stop releasing eggs. Menopause "officially" starts with a woman's final menstrual period.
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HEALTH
June 28, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
When warnings first emerged two years ago about the safety of taking hormones for menopausal symptoms, many women began turning to alternative treatments, such as herbs, for relief. Now researchers are asking whether the most common of those herbs, black cohosh, is any safer. A plant native to North America, black cohosh has long been an American folk remedy for menopausal discomforts such as hot flashes.
NEWS
April 23, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Menopause is a midlife milestone for all women that, in the eyes of some scientists, is as important a signature of the human species as a large brain and an opposable thumb. It may have ensured the evolutionary triumph of the human family, they say, by freeing older women to care for their grandchildren. Yet others have argued that it amounts to no more than hot flashes, brittle bones and barren years.
HEALTH
July 5, 2004 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Sharon Pruhs was only 42 years old when she began experiencing menopausal symptoms. "I remember exactly where I was when I experienced my first hot flash," she recalls. "I was standing at the card catalog at the library." The Los Angeles librarian figured, "Here we go." But she didn't actually reach menopause until she was 54. Her experience is not uncommon. Gradual hormonal and physical changes typically start years before menopause, which begins at a woman's final menstrual period.
HEALTH
February 28, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Colleen Dawmen had been plagued for years by severe hot flashes that would wash over her dozens of times a day and awaken her, dripping with sweat, three or four times a night. "I'd get so overwhelmed by this furnace-like heat that I felt like my head was going to explode," says the 51-year-old nurse. She didn't want to take hormones, but black cohosh and progesterone cream had failed to curb her symptoms. "I was at the mercy of these hot flashes," she says.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Susan Leary turned 40, she found herself wondering out loud with a friend about what her biological clock would bring in the next decade. "I said, 'Gosh, when do women go through menopause? And she goes, 'Well, I don't know.' And then I asked a couple of other friends. No one seemed to know--and these were all women in their 40s," the San Francisco health care executive said. "I don't really know what to expect," Leary said. "Is it like chronic PMS (premenstrual syndrome)?
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government said Friday that it plans to conduct the most sweeping study of women's health problems ever attempted, with hundreds of thousands of women participating in a research effort expected to cost $500 million over 10 years. The project is the brainchild of the new director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Bernadine Healy, who said that it would be "the most definitive, far-reaching study of women's health ever undertaken in the United States, if not the world."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
In the pantheon of favorite topics for musicals, love stories loom large, from "Carousel" to "Camelot." And classics redux aren't far behind: "My Fair Lady," "Man of La Mancha," "The Wizard of Oz." But collaborators Barbara Schill and Dave Mackay don't have to worry about plowing worn-out terrain. They're the team behind a new musical revue about menopause. Yes, menopause. "Is It Just Me, or Is It Hot in Here?
NEWS
October 19, 1986
The season opener of "The Golden Girls" was certainly disappointing. Who wants to listen to 30 minutes of dialogue about periods, curses and menopause? I cannot understand how four talented actresses would allow themselves to be in such an episode. Betty Dooley, Balboa
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some women who take the estrogen supplement Estrace to reduce the symptoms of menopause may triple blood levels of the female hormone estradiole--and perhaps raise their risk of breast cancer--by consuming moderate amounts of alcohol, a small study suggests. The research published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. said that in women taking Estrace, one or two alcoholic drinks significantly raised blood levels of estradiole for about five hours.
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