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Menopause

NEWS
October 2, 1997 | REUTERS
U.S. women have a more positive attitude toward menopause than previously thought, according to a nationwide survey. "More and more American women are saying they don't regard menopause as such a big deal," said Dr. Wulf Utian, head of the North American Menopause Society, which commissioned the Gallup survey. The poll of 750 women from ages 45 to 60 showed that slightly more than half, or 52%, viewed menopause as the beginning of a new and fulfilling stage of life.
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NATIONAL
July 7, 2004 | From Reuters
Soy protein, which has been recommended to menopausal women as a substitute for hormone replacement therapy, did not fend off symptoms such as bone loss in a study of Dutch women released Tuesday. Naturally occurring compounds called isoflavones found in soybeans are thought to mimic estrogen compounds in hormone replacement therapy. Some women want to avoid hormone therapy because recent studies have shown long-term use can raise the risk of stroke, dementia and some forms of cancer.
HEALTH
October 27, 1997 | SUSAN REIMER, THE BALTIMORE SUN
I am a woman of a certain age. I will not be more specific, except to say that "menopause" is not a vocabulary word on my SATs but an event in my no-longer-distant future. And I will allow that I am closer to the end of my reproductive life than I am to the beginning of it. I am trying to be upbeat about the approach of this watershed experience for women. I am trying to think of it as a spiritual transformation instead of another step toward the grave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Estrogen replacement therapy can reduce the risk of death in post-menopausal women as much as 37%, especially among those with high risk factors for heart disease, but the benefits decline for some women with prolonged use, according to a report in the June 19 New England Journal of Medicine. The results were obtained from the Nurses' Health Study, begun in 1976, of more than 121,000 women.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Standard doses of the sex hormone estrogen strengthen brain activity in older, post-menopausal women, Yale University researchers said Tuesday, offering the best evidence yet that the commonly prescribed hormone alters the neural circuits involved in human memory. By testing the kind of working memory involved in everyday verbal and visual tasks, the researchers quickly detected significant differences in neural activity between women who were taking the hormone and those who were not.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
For the first time, doctors appear to have restored fertility in a menopausal woman by reimplanting into her abdomen several pieces of her ovaries that had been removed and frozen when she was younger. The experimental procedure, performed on an American ballerina, could lead to greatly expanded reproductive options for women by allowing them to become pregnant years or decades later in life than is now possible, doctors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Pushing the frontiers of pregnancy, researchers at USC have found that women older than 50 who are past menopause stand a good chance of giving birth to healthy babies with the help of sophisticated embryo donation techniques. In a study published in this week's issue of the British journal the Lancet, the USC researchers report that of 14 post-menopausal women between 50 and 55, eight became pregnant.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | JAN ZIEGLER, AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE SERVICE
Should a woman take estrogen when her body stops making it? The question stirs intense debate among health experts. It also provokes confusion and worry among the millions of American women who must decide whether estrogen replacement therapy is right for them. When a woman reaches menopause, her levels of both estrogen and progesterone decline, and her ovaries stop releasing eggs. Menopause "officially" starts with a woman's final menstrual period.
HEALTH
June 28, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
When warnings first emerged two years ago about the safety of taking hormones for menopausal symptoms, many women began turning to alternative treatments, such as herbs, for relief. Now researchers are asking whether the most common of those herbs, black cohosh, is any safer. A plant native to North America, black cohosh has long been an American folk remedy for menopausal discomforts such as hot flashes.
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