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Menopause

HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Thanks to Viagra, Cialis and Levitra, men with erectile dysfunction can get on board the Food and Drug Administration-approved love train. But women who experience a different sexual problem -- sagging libido -- have been left at the station. That may be changing. BioSante Pharmaceuticals Inc. is testing the safety and effectiveness of LibiGel, a testosterone gel for women designed to combat declines in sexual arousal associated with menopause. There are currently no drugs available in the U.S.
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HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Women expect menopause; it's the hormonal changes beforehand that blindside them. "I felt like I was living in someone else's body," says Debbie Greenberg, 45, who three years ago began having heavy periods, days-long headaches and "brain fog." "I didn't know what was going on. I had no clue. I wondered if I was cracking up." When her gynecologist identified her symptoms as part of perimenopause, Greenberg says, "it was validation."
HEALTH
July 15, 2002 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More women than ever may now look for other ways to ease menopausal symptoms after last week's news that long-term hormone therapy increases slightly the risk of heart attacks, strokes and breast cancer. One of the most likely options, experts say, will be natural therapies. Already, more than 30% of women say they use herbs and other supplements, according to the North American Menopause Society.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Nearly five years after government scientists told women that estrogen replacement therapy increased their risks of heart attack and stroke, researchers have largely reversed their position, concluding that the drugs are beneficial for many after all.
SCIENCE
March 18, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writers
A major study of 16,000 women has found that hormone replacement therapy does not improve the quality of life for post-menopausal women, a finding that may sound the death knell for widespread use of a treatment once thought to be a panacea for women's ailments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
In the pantheon of favorite topics for musicals, love stories loom large, from "Carousel" to "Camelot." And classics redux aren't far behind: "My Fair Lady," "Man of La Mancha," "The Wizard of Oz." But collaborators Barbara Schill and Dave Mackay don't have to worry about plowing worn-out terrain. They're the team behind a new musical revue about menopause. Yes, menopause. "Is It Just Me, or Is It Hot in Here?
SCIENCE
July 14, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many women, it felt like a slap in the face. They had been given hormones for years at menopause to gain relief from hot flashes and night sweats. But as the years went by they were told something far grander: By continuing to take the drugs well past menopause, they could not only lessen their risk of osteoporosis but also possibly of heart disease, the leading cause of death for women. Now it seems the promise was not so bright.
HEALTH
March 27, 2000 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Susan Sullivan doesn't know whether her health would be helped or harmed by hormone replacement therapy. But the 55-year-old Topanga Canyon artist is counting on one thing: By the time her 20-year-old daughter reaches menopause, there will finally be some solid, trustworthy medical information about who should be on hormones and why. Like most U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2002 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Many women are frightened by conflicting reports about the safety of hormone therapy -- so much so that some are simply throwing away their pills. Doctors across Ventura County say they see it every day. "I can't tell you how many messages have come across my desk: 'I stopped taking my estrogen -- just wanted you to know,' " said Ventura cardiologist Thomas Kong. To address the confusion, Community Memorial Hospital will hold a women's health symposium at 1 p.m.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women and their doctors are now getting some help making the complicated decisions about hormone therapy. But the guidance only goes so far--and doesn't resolve such basic questions as how long a woman can safely take hormones.
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