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BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | TIMOTHY H. WILLARD, TIMOTHY H. WILLARD is managing editor of the Futurist, a publication of the World Future Society in Bethesda, Md
Providing mental health care and substance abuse treatment for workers and their families is likely to be a growing expense for U.S. employers in the 1990s. And the cost is rising even faster than the cost of other types of health care. In the 1980s, the total workplace cost of mental illness and substance abuse--factoring in treatment, lost productivity, and damaged property--was estimated to be as high as $237 billion a year.
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NEWS
September 24, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
What a difference a week makes. Last Tuesday, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors considered various proposals that would expand the number of beds for mentally ill inmates as part of a new jail construction plan. This week, the supervisors heard from state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), who outlined how increased state funding earmarked for mental health and substance-abuse treatment could be used to help reduce the county's jail population. Steinberg's visit is yet another reminder that before the supervisors ask taxpayers to spend $1 billion to build a new jail, the county ought to consider some alternative ways to deal with overcrowding, including diversion programs for those mentally ill inmates who pose no public safety threat.
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NEWS
September 30, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
It wasn't so much that President Clinton said mental-health services would be included as a basic benefit in his health-care reform plan. It was Congress' reaction. On both sides of the aisle, lawmakers rose and cheered the concept of equating illnesses of the brain with illnesses that occur elsewhere in the body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2013
Chalk up another victory for Gov. Jerry Brown, George Skelton writes in his Thursday column. All the top lawmakers are on board with his plan to meet a court order to reduce prison crowding, giving him a clear path to avoid any early releases in the coming months. "There'll be no Willie Horton on his watch," Skelton writes. The deal on prisons was finalized after negotiations with Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), who balked at spending more money on private prisons without new funding for rehabilitation programs.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Sandra had been diagnosed with manic depression in 1973 at age 19. But, with lithium and psychiatric counseling, she coped well. She even held down a low-paying job. Then, in 1986, she moved to Southern California. Her woes were about to begin. Because her income was meager, she found psychiatric care through a San Fernando-based public clinic that charged her on a sliding-scale fee. However, in 1990, state budget cutbacks left her with just the health insurance provided by her employer.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Consumers who see their mental health benefits expanded in the future will also discover that insurers will be intimately involved in the process. In managed care plans, employers and the insurance companies they hire monitor, evaluate and control how benefits are doled out. Experts predict it is only through managed care that some states and private companies are taking timid steps to expand benefits.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1988 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
A Northrop worker ordered by his boss to seek treatment for alcoholism was told by the physician provided through the firm's health maintenance organization simply to "go home and quit drinking."
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Just under 2 million Californians have mental-health problems or illnesses that require treatment, but only a fraction of them receive care, according to a report released Wednesday by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. The study found that one in 12 of the state's adults have symptoms that are consistent with serious psychological distress and cause them difficulty functioning at home or work. About half said they are not receiving treatment for their symptoms and about 25% receive "inadequate treatment," according to the authors of the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
A disjointed financing system for mental health services in California has led to gaps in care , but the national healthcare law is expected to help close some of those holes, according to new research by the California HealthCare Foundation. Half of the state's adults and two-thirds of the adolescents with mental health issues aren't receiving treatment, according to the study . Private insurance has historically lacked mental health services, so patients often seek care through the public system.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an unexpected consequence of a gun control law that took effect Jan. 1, the names of people admitted for mental health treatment at California hospitals are being recorded in state law enforcement computers. Although meant to keep firearms away from those who are considered dangerous to themselves or to society, the practice also applies to psychiatric patients who voluntarily check themselves in for treatment and have no history of violent behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2013 | By Paige St. John
This post has been updated. SACRAMENTO -- The U.S. Justice Department has weighed in on California's use of solitary confinement and other forms of isolation for mentally ill inmates, saying it has found that such conditions subject prisoners “to a risk of serious harm. " In a court filing Friday, lawyers in the Justice Department's civil-rights division took no position on inmates' request for a court order to block California from keeping mentally ill prisoners in its controversial isolation units.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
A disjointed financing system for mental health services in California has led to gaps in care , but the national healthcare law is expected to help close some of those holes, according to new research by the California HealthCare Foundation. Half of the state's adults and two-thirds of the adolescents with mental health issues aren't receiving treatment, according to the study . Private insurance has historically lacked mental health services, so patients often seek care through the public system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Abby Sewell
Concerned that federal authorities could soon intervene in the operation of Los Angeles County's outdated jail system, the Board of Supervisors took a significant step Tuesday toward replacing the Men's Central Jail and renovating other facilities to reduce crowding and increase mental health services for prisoners. The board voted unanimously to accept a report from consultants who outlined five jail renovation options. All options included tearing down and replacing the cornerstone of the nation's largest jail system - the Men's Central Jail - and reconfiguring other existing facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- The decades-long battle over California prisons continued on Thursday as federal judges ordered Gov. Jerry Brown to begin releasing inmates to reduce overcrowding in state lockups. The case is rooted in a 1990 lawsuit, when attorneys for state inmates said their constitutional rights were being violated because of inadequate mental-health care. Years later, in 2001, another lawsuit was filed, charging the state with failing to provide sufficient medical care.
OPINION
May 7, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Gov. Jerry Brown has made it clear how unhappy he is about having to produce a plan to reduce the inmate population of California's prisons by another 9,000. Under the 2011 realignment law, the state has already lowered the prisoner count by 43,000 by diverting many would-be new prisoners to county jails and many would-be parole violators to county supervision. Besides, the governor has argued, the whole point of the court-imposed population cap - 137.5% of capacity - is to resolve serious problems with inmate medical and mental health care, and hasn't that already been done with an enormous new commitment of resources and treatment?
OPINION
April 21, 2013
Re "Soaking taxpayers, again," Opinion, April 17 Each law that Lloyd Billingsley considers as "soaking taxpayers" is aimed at rectifying some of the many social costs that occur when the notion of some mythical freedom includes destroying the environment and our well-being. The price of a healthy society for all is taxes. Billingsley can deride these taxes if he wishes, but when he says that "hundreds of millions of dollars" spent on mental health care and affordable housing will never be enough for the politicians, you have to wonder where he thinks our social resources should be going.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Richard Winton and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
"I sleep in trash cans. " It is a minute and 45 seconds into the security camera video. Kelly Thomas, 37, jaws with police officers at a Fullerton bus depot, his arms crossed over his bare chest, his backpack double-strapped. It is the night of July 5, 2011, about 8:30. It's still 80 degrees outside. A few pedestrians wander by. A car passes. There is no indication that the lives of every person on the tape are about to change. "You planning on going to sleep pretty soon?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1999
Re Ventura County's system of mental health care. If anything is to be learned from the turmoil of the past two years, it is the value of an open process, nondefensiveness and the reporting of honest facts. From its inception, legislation for the Ventura Model promised more than the system delivered. Yet it was characterized and promoted as highly successful. The money attached to it made it sacrosanct. Critics were maligned as "adversarial" or "rabble-rousers." Yet they were the heartbeat of the system, taking distress calls from other families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California's bid to end court oversight of the care it gives about 33,000 mentally ill inmates was heard Wednesday by a federal judge who voiced concern that he had only days to weigh thousands of pages of contradictory claims and issue a decision. Gov. Jerry Brown's motion to end oversight, filed in early January, triggered a federal law that requires a decision in 90 days. Documents produced in court show the state began its own preparation in late 2011, when it hired experts to review the adequacy of inmate care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California's legal efforts to end federal oversight of prison mental health care have run into trouble with the U.S. district judge hearing that case a second time. In an order filed Monday, Judge Lawrence Karlton asked California to explain why he should not throw out statements of four of the state's expert witnesses, who contend they found adequate mental health care in the 10 prisons they toured. Lawyers for prisoners contend the experts' testimony was based on secret tours of the state's prisons that were organized in 2011, without notifying plaintiffs or the court.
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