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Mental Patients

OPINION
July 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
After a long and shameful history, California finally banned the forced sterilization of prison inmates and mental patients in the 1970s; two decades later, the state put safeguards in place to make sure the practice didn't resume. But a new report by the Center for Investigative Reporting suggests that despite those laws, at least 148 female inmates underwent tubal ligations between 2006 and 2010 without the required approval by state medical officials. Many of the women who were sterilized while housed at the California Institution for Women in Corona and Valley State Prison for Women in Chowchilla said they were coerced into agreeing to the procedure, according to the report.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Leonard James Patton pleaded guilty Monday to the 1994 murder of a Huntington Harbour woman and was ordered to serve a life sentence in a state mental hospital. His family, many of whom attended Monday's hearing in Orange County Superior Court, had tried more than three years ago--before the killing--to have Patton committed to a mental institution but was unsuccessful. Superior Court Judge John J.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | JOHN FLESHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There was a time when a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia probably would have kept John Segreto in a mental institution for life. But development of anti-psychotic drugs in the 1950s and the "deinstitutionalization" movement two decades later changed that. The new thinking was that most mental patients, with proper medication and treatment, could live at home or in outpatient centers. It was "a flop," says Richard Greer, forensic psychiatrist with the University of Florida.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to withstand heavy competition and continuing losses, Midwood Community Hospital in Stanton has stopped admitting medical and surgical patients and is expanding its psychiatric services. Robert I. Mawhinney, Midwood administrator, said Tuesday that the 110-bed hospital shut down its general surgical and medical operations early this month and is now exclusively treating the mentally ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
A former janitor who shot and killed seven people in a 1976 rampage in the library at Cal State Fullerton was denied release from a state psychiatric hospital by a judge Tuesday. Superior Court Judge James Jackman denied a petition by Edward Charles Allaway to have his treatment program declared unconstitutional. But the judge ordered officials at Atascadero State Hospital to develop a new treatment program for Allaway, who was found innocent of the murders by reason of insanity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Decrying the shortage of mental health services in Orange County, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday agreed to sue the state in an effort to obtain additional beds that officials contend are sorely needed to treat mentally ill patients. County health-care advocates praised the decision to file suit as a significant departure from the way the county has dealt with the state and its method of funding health-care programs. For years, Orange County has ranked among the lowest of California's 58 counties in per capita spending by the state on local health and welfare programs.
NEWS
May 21, 1993 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new law protecting the right of psychiatric patients to own firearms has inadvertently limited background checks on gun buyers who have been locked up as dangerous mental patients, according to the state Department of Justice. "That was not our intention," said Assemblyman Dan Hauser (D-Arcata), who wrote the law and said he will seek new legislation to remedy the problem.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | CYNTHIA RICHMOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dear Cynthia: I had an extremely vivid dream on the same night that I found out a very dear uncle had died. He was a psychiatrist. In my dream, my husband and I read in the newspaper that mental patients were being transported via an underwater vehicle to an unknown destination. Next, I find my husband and I are seated in a submersible of glass, very comfortable and airy. Two pilots take us at incredible speed to the very bottom of the ocean--everything is totally clear, tranquil, full of light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Bedlam often reigns in Department 95 of Los Angeles County Superior Court. Defendants make obscene gestures, throw things, urinate in their clothes and sing songs. "If you like the trappings of formality, this isn't the place," said Judge Michael D. Pirosh, who last week ended a four-year assignment as Department 95's presiding judge. Department 95 is the only county court--and one of a handful nationwide--that deals exclusively with mental competency cases, legal experts say.
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