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NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety-one percent of thousands of children's meals at the biggest restaurant chains don't meet standards set by the National Restaurant Assn.'s own initiative for healthful kids' meals, a study out Thursday from a nutrition advocacy group says. And nine chains have no meals that meet those standards, the study says. The trade group's standards are voluntary, and it notes that among the participating chains, there are more than 340 healthful kids' items on menus. The Center for Science in the Public Interest did find some “good news” in its study: Nearly half the chains offer at least one healthier meal, said Ameena Batada, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina who conducted the study.
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NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Patina's black truffle dinners are back: Downtown L.A.'s Patina will be offering three-, five- and seven-course tasting menus during the restaurant's annual black truffle dinner series today through Friday. This year's menu will feature butternut squash velouté with black truffle brioche, a filet of John Dory with black truffle venoise , salsify and bitter greens; Scottish wood pigeon and black truffle roulé ; veal served with wild mushrooms; and for dessert, vanilla pain perdu with roasted pear and black truffle crème anglaise . The three-, five- and seven-course truffle tasting menus are priced at $85, $125 and $175 per person, respectively.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2013 | By Beverly Beyette
Big, bigger, biggest is not what cruising is all about in 2013. In fact, most of this year's new ships are designed for river cruising, carrying fewer than 200 passengers. Woodland Hills-based Viking River Cruises leads the way, introducing 10 new longships on its European routes - with eight more coming in 2014. River cruising is so popular, said Carolyn Spencer Brown, editor in chief of CruiseCritic.com, that "they're running out of rivers. " Well, not quite, but it's no longer just the usual suspects.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
The online shop Cool Culinaria specializes in “vintage menu art rescued from obscurity and reimagined as posters. " A 13-by-19-inch Giclee print of the Brown Derby luncheon menu cover costs $28 unframed, $145 framed. They've got them in larger sizes, too, 16-by-20 for $45 and 20-by-24, $52, both unframed. The Derby's dinner menu is available, too, but I love the luncheon version with Hollywood and Vine picked out in red. You also get a copy of the interior menu listing the Derby's famous dishes, such as shrimp Creole, veal paprika - and Cobb salad.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
Venture inside the walls of the Disneyland Resort and you'll encounter numerous wonders rarely found outside of Orange Country. This summer's reopening of the California Adventure park, for instance, attracted plenty of buzz with the introduction of Cars Land and a host of other rides and attractions not found at any other Disney-branded theme park. But the objects capable of giving visitors a true buzz have received much less attention. Relatively unnoticed in the California Adventure makeover is the park's increased offerings of craft beer.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
During the recession, offering deals on meals was key to getting patrons into restaurants. These days, that may no longer be the case. Combo packages and value menus don't have the same allure for customers that they had in the downturn, according to research company NPD Group Inc. Deal-driven traffic has declined over the last two years, while the number of consumers paying full price has increased 1% each year. The situation was reversed three years ago. Now, increased focus on healthful eating and premium options has shifted emphasis from dollar-menu offerings to more upscale foods.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
During the recession, offering deals on meals was key to getting restaurant patrons through the door. These days, that may no longer be the case. Combo packages and value menus don't have the same allure for customers that they had in the downturn, according to research company NPD Group . Deal-driven traffic has declined over the last two years, while the number of consumers paying full price has increased 1% each year. Three years ago, the situation was reversed. Now, increased focus on healthful eating and premium options has retrained emphasis from dollar menu offerings to more upscale foods.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
What we've got here is "coffee confusion. " That's what a British survey found in determining that 70% of java drinkers couldn't figure out a latte from a mocha or a venti from a grande. So the Debenhams department store chain, based in London, replaced all the names with what it called "plain English. " Its new menu, announced this week, lets customers order a "frothy coffee" instead of a cappuccino. A caffe mocha is now a "chocolate flavored coffee" and a caffe latte is a "really, really milky coffee.
FOOD
October 27, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
"The revolution has succeeded and it's been televised," says Michael McCarty, sitting over a plate of heirloom tomatoes with burrata on the patio of his Santa Monica restaurant, Michael's. "Five-year-olds are watching 'Top Chef' now. " And the next revolution is already well underway, this time live-streaming, with the Internet changing our knowledge of food and how we eat it. And L.A.'s godfathers of California cuisine have responded. Over the last few weeks, Wolfgang Puck's Spago and McCarty's Michael's have softly opened the doors on radically new restaurants, with fresh design and totally revamped menus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
For every three California public school students who think school meals are yummier than usual, there's only one who thinks they're worse, according to a new poll released Wednesday. The survey by the California Endowment, the state's largest healthcare foundation, was the first to tally the attitudes of California students and parents since new national nutrition standards took effect in July. The changes by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, put into place partially to help curb childhood obesity, require schools to offer whole grains and low-fat milk and to cut back on sodium and saturated fat levels.
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