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NEWS
January 30, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
When Herbert Iske returned to California after nine grueling months in the Pacific theater in World War II, he assumed the veterans parades and salutes and bands were meant for him too. He was wrong: As a member of the U.S. merchant marine, Iske soon discovered that, in the eyes of his country, he was not a "veteran" of the war at all.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Jack Vance, who penned his first short stories while serving in the U.S. Merchant Marine in the 1940s and became a prolific, award-winning author of elaborate works of science fiction, fantasy and mystery, has died. He was 96. Vance died Sunday at his home in Oakland of what his son John Holbrook Vance II described as complications of old age. "Everything just finally caught up with him," his son said. Among his best-known works was "The Dying Earth," a collection of linked fantasy stories first published in 1950 that told of life on the planet in the far distant future, with a weak sun ever in danger of burning out. Complete with heroic quests and magical duels, it is considered to have influenced many more recent fantasy writers, including "Game of Thrones" author George R.R. Martin, and was later expanded into several novels.
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BOOKS
September 30, 1990
As a Vietnam War historian, I was pleased to read the Aug. 26 review by Charles Bowden on "Looking for a Ship" by John McPhee. Bowden's review summarizes the changes within the merchant-marine industry during the past 20 years and it clearly outlines the potential impacts the current events in the Middle East and the Persian Gulf may have on the merchant fleet. However, readers should not forget that when American merchant ships become the illegal targets of foreign governments' military action, it is the American military that is called to the rescue.
HOME & GARDEN
December 22, 2012 | By Diane Hoover
It was our first Christmas together, and I was determined that it would be special. We had booked a hotel room for the holidays on the sand at Pismo Beach. Jim, my new love, had Mark Harmon hair and a Richard Gere smile. He watched BBC News, read (actual) books and regularly finished the Sunday Los Angeles Times crossword puzzle - in pen. He was also a no-nonsense merchant marine, so I was resolved that there would be nothing too frilly about this celebration. I spent the weeks before the holidays scouring thrift shops for inexpensive lights, garland and ornaments - with no emotional baggage - all of which could be discarded when Christmas was done.
BOOKS
August 26, 1990 | Jack Miles
Contacted by telephone in New Jersey, John McPhee commented to a Times reporter on the implications of the Persian Gulf crisis for the American merchant marine and vice versa. "It's suddenly become very easy to get a job," he said. His book, "Looking for a Ship" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), deals extensively with recent competition among merchant seamen for scarce work.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2009 | Richard Simon
During World War II, Herman "Hank" Rosen spent 30 days in a lifeboat with 23 other men after his ship was torpedoed. Only five survived. Stanley Willner was a prisoner of war for three years after his ship went down. Forced to work under slave labor conditions on the infamous bridge on the River Kwai, he weighed just 74 pounds when he was liberated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Local veterans of the U.S. merchant marine may soon get their own memorial in Marin County. A six-member committee has raised $9,000 to pay for an engraved granite monument that will be embossed with the merchant marine insignia and a likeness of the Jeremiah O'Brien merchant marine ship in bronze. But they still need another $5,000 to cover the expenses of the dedication ceremony and reception planned for May 22, National Maritime Day.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Senate voted Tuesday to end a 6-decade-old system of subsidies for the merchant marine fleet, replacing it with direct payments to owners who agree to make their ships available during wartime. The measure, passed 88 to 10, overhauls the 1936 Merchant Marine Act that subsidizes ship owners for the difference between the costs of U.S. crews and registrations and the costs of sailing under a foreign flag.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice Adm. Gordon McLintock, who headed the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy on New York's Long Island for 22 years, has died. He was 87. McLintock died Monday of bone cancer at his home in Chevy Chase, Md. Born into a British seagoing family, McLintock first went to sea when he was 3 aboard a ship on which his father served as an officer. One of his grandfathers was head of a major shipyard and the other owned a Mediterranean fleet of sailing vessels.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Lady Gaga had her "Marilyn Monroe moment" Saturday at Bill Clinton's 65th birthday party, and actress Michelle Phillips will take her turn in the upcoming British film "My Week With Marillyn" opening in November. Three Southern California exhibitions this month  - one opening and two closing  -   stoke the obsession with all things Marilyn. Los Angeles: Large-scale photographs of Monroe by Lawrence Schiller capture the seductress in her final film shoot on the set of the 1962 (unfinished)
NATIONAL
June 9, 2009 | Richard Simon
During World War II, Herman "Hank" Rosen spent 30 days in a lifeboat with 23 other men after his ship was torpedoed. Only five survived. Stanley Willner was a prisoner of war for three years after his ship went down. Forced to work under slave labor conditions on the infamous bridge on the River Kwai, he weighed just 74 pounds when he was liberated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2009 | Times Staff Reports
Ciro "Mario" Marino, 76, who opened his first Los Angeles restaurant in 1957 and held court at Marino Ristorante near Paramount Studios for more than two decades, died of lung cancer Wednesday at his Los Angeles home, his family said. For more than 50 years, Marino served unpretentious Neapolitan-style Italian cuisine at his Los Angeles restaurants. Born Oct. 26, 1932, in Naples, Italy, he was the son of a merchant marine. He was one of 10 siblings; only four survived World War II. At 16, Marino also joined the merchant marine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2008 | Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
When their armored truck toppled into a canal that night in southern Afghanistan, the soldiers struggled to free themselves in the darkness as the water level rose. One of them was Army Sgt. James M. Treber, a 24-year-old Green Beret from Imperial Beach, near San Diego, who recently was married and had arrived in the country for his first combat tour just six weeks earlier. He and two other soldiers drowned in the June 29 accident near Khosrow-E Sofla in Kandahar province.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2008 | Christopher Goffard, Times Staff Writer
When their armored truck toppled into a canal that night in southern Afghanistan, the soldiers struggled to free themselves in the darkness as the water level rose. One of them was Army Sgt. James M. Treber, a 24-year-old Green Beret from Imperial Beach, near San Diego, who recently was married and had arrived in the country for his first combat tour just six weeks earlier. He and two other soldiers drowned in the June 29 accident near Khosrow-E Sofla in Kandahar province.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Local veterans of the U.S. merchant marine may soon get their own memorial in Marin County. A six-member committee has raised $9,000 to pay for an engraved granite monument that will be embossed with the merchant marine insignia and a likeness of the Jeremiah O'Brien merchant marine ship in bronze. But they still need another $5,000 to cover the expenses of the dedication ceremony and reception planned for May 22, National Maritime Day.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2003
Re: "America's Dwindling Merchant Fleet Is Sending Out an SOS," (Jan. 19): There were many points of factual and topical accuracy, including the corrosive impact of rogue flag-of-convenience shipping on the American merchant marine, the sound domestic protections of the Jones Act and the critical importance of renewed funding for international U.S.-flag ships in the Maritime Security Program. But the effect of accuracy gained in those points was unfortunately diminished by an unsuitable subtext of presumed stasis, inevitable decay and impending expiration of our industry, trade, and Union.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2003 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
A sailor's life was the life for Andy Andersen. Lucky for him he was born 78 years ago. Back in his prime, the U.S. merchant fleet was the largest in the world, with hundreds of cargo ships casting off each month from the Pacific Coast. Andersen still grins about the weeks he lost in Manila, Hong Kong, Malaysia's Sibu and other distant ports, whose names alone could set a young adventurer's heart racing.
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