Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMerchant Seamen
IN THE NEWS

Merchant Seamen

NEWS
May 5, 1994 | GORDON DILLOW
Five days after leaving Los Angeles on a 9,000-mile voyage to England, the restored World War II cargo ship Lane Victory and its crew of retired merchant seamen has been stalled near Acapulco, Mexico, by a malfunctioning boiler. But the ship's 54 volunteer crew members, whose average age is 68, hope that the ship will be able to make it to ceremonies June 6 marking the 50th anniversary of the D-day invasion on the Normandy coast of France.
Advertisement
OPINION
October 4, 1987
Shireen Hunter's article (Op-Ed Page, Sept. 27) urges the U.S. to reduce tensions in the Persian Gulf. Her recommendation follows a unique analysis of events in that region. Hunter suggests that the Iranians are ready for peace as soon as Iraqi blame for the war is internationally recognized. But the issue is less one of assigning guilt and whether that cease fire is in situ or along pre-war borders. The answer is not discernible in Iran's "more flexible stand." Hunter seems to downplay Iran's culpability in the gulf crisis because it has chosen the "indirect action of laying mines."
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The giants of wine, the French, have the Italians to thank, it seems. The story of wine in France -- where the industry grew to influence the world -- can be traced in part through a vessel called an amphora and likely produced around 525 BC to 475 BC. And, scientists say, a key to the story of wine culture moving to Mediterranean France is Lattara, a coastal site south of Montpelier. It was there that the French first set up vineyards and made wine, said Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania Museums of Archaeology and Anthropology.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2009 | Richard Simon
During World War II, Herman "Hank" Rosen spent 30 days in a lifeboat with 23 other men after his ship was torpedoed. Only five survived. Stanley Willner was a prisoner of war for three years after his ship went down. Forced to work under slave labor conditions on the infamous bridge on the River Kwai, he weighed just 74 pounds when he was liberated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1990 | CLAY EVANS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-five years after the last big guns were stripped from the decks of the merchant ship Lane Victory, the salty "crew" of the retired vessel watched Thursday as the ship was rearmed while docked in Los Angeles Harbor. The crew, members of the U.S. Merchant Marine Veterans World War II, gave each other slaps on the back as a 50-foot crane hoisted a four-ton, anti-aircraft cannon to the ship's stern.
BOOKS
August 26, 1990 | Jack Miles
Contacted by telephone in New Jersey, John McPhee commented to a Times reporter on the implications of the Persian Gulf crisis for the American merchant marine and vice versa. "It's suddenly become very easy to get a job," he said. His book, "Looking for a Ship" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), deals extensively with recent competition among merchant seamen for scarce work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1990 | CLAY EVANS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-five years after the last big guns were stripped from the decks of the merchant ship Lane Victory, the salty "crew" of the retired vessel watched as the ship was rearmed while docked in Los Angeles Harbor. The crew, members of the U.S. Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II, gave each other slaps on the back as a 50-foot-tall crane hoisted a four-ton, anti-aircraft cannon to the ship's stern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Shannon J. Wall, a former president of the National Maritime Union who lobbied for veterans status for men who sailed on merchant ships during World War II, has died. He was 87. Wall died of complications related to old age Feb. 2 at his home in Sequim, Wash., said his daughter, Maureen Hope Wall. Although about 250,000 merchant seamen were pressed into combat-style duty during World War II, the U.S. did not recognize them as veterans until more than four decades later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1987 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
The last time Richard Connelly left for the Soviet port of Murmansk, the Nazis sank his supply-laden ship in the North Atlantic. Last week, the retired Long Beach merchant seaman set out again, this time to honor his fellow mariners who died transporting war materiel to the frigid Soviet port during World War II.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|