Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMercosur
IN THE NEWS

Mercosur

NEWS
January 1, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What once seemed like ivory tower daydreaming is now reality in the making: Huge trade blocs are forming up and down the Americas to let goods and services pass freely across international borders. Not only is there a NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement, stretching from the Yukon to the Yucatan. There is also a SAFTA--a South American free-trade area that extends from Amazonia to Patagonia.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 30, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although insisting that a proposed Europe-Latin America free-trade zone is not directed "against" the United States, 46 heads of state took a historic first step Tuesday toward lessening the dominance of Uncle Sam in his own backyard. Latin and European leaders agreed to start nontariff negotiations in November on a transatlantic trade deal to include the 15-nation European Union and the Mercosur trade bloc--of Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay.
NEWS
December 13, 1994
The presidents of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay will gather Friday in the Brazilian city of Ouro Preto to put the finishing touches on their southern Common Market, the so-called Mercosur. Duty-free trade among the four Mercosur countries is scheduled to begin Jan. 1. Mercosur has its origins in an economic integration agreement signed by Brazil and Argentina in 1988. In 1990, Paraguay and Uruguay joined the group, which has reduced tariffs by stages.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Argentina wrestles with its latest economic woes, one unintended victim of the crisis could be trade relations and a possible death blow to Mercosur, the trading partnership that comprises Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. Born amid great hopes, Mercosur was supposed to provide a regional market for home-grown commodities and services. Instead, critics say, it has institutionalized the instability and inefficiency of its members.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suddenly, an economic powerhouse is rising on the South American horizon. Ambitious dreams became a reality Jan. 1 with the beginning of zero-tariff trade among the four members of Mercosur, the so-called Southern Common Market. The new free-trade bloc has a combined population of nearly 200 million, is larger than Europe and includes South America's two most productive economies, Brazil and Argentina. Paraguay and Uruguay are the other members. But Mercosur is not stopping there.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European and South American leaders will shake hands Friday on a groundbreaking agreement aimed at freer trade and closer cooperation between the two continents. The framework will commit the European Union and Mercosur--Latin America's first full-fledged trading bloc--to a broad process of economic and political negotiations over a period of 10 years or more.
SPORTS
January 27, 2002
Supporters of the San Lorenzo soccer team will do anything to get a good view for the Mercosur Cup match against Flamengo on Thursday at the Nuevo Gasometro Stadium in Buenos Aires.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | Reuters
U.S. Trade Representative Robert Zoellick said the United States and the Mercosur countries of South America would hold a first set of free-trade talks this week in Uruguay. Zoellick made the announcement at the end of a trade ministers' meeting hosted by Mexico to narrow differences on the agenda for new world-trade talks. Zoellick said he would meet with the Mercosur countries of Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay on the sidelines of a Cairns Group meeting set for today and Tuesday.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2000 | Reuters
Agriculture officials from South America's leading food producers will meet in Buenos Aires today to reach common ground on trade and food safety issues ahead of a meeting with the European Union in April. Brazilian Agriculture Minister Marcus Vinicius Pratini de Moraes and Argentine Agriculture Secretary Antonio Berhongaray will try to settle trade rifts over pork, chickens, rice, wheat, dairy products and honey between their two nations.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
Riven with internal disputes, the South American trade bloc known as Mercosur sought to project a renewed sense of vigor and unity Friday as member nations welcomed oil-rich Venezuela to the group and lauded the attendance of Cuba's Fidel Castro.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|