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October 10, 2009 | Staff and Wire Reports
The Phoenix Mercury is the WNBA champion for the second time in three seasons, leaning on its "big three" to pull out a 94-86 victory over the tenacious Indiana Fever in the deciding Game 5 on Friday night at Phoenix. League and finals most valuable player Diana Taurasi scored 26 points, Cappie Pondexter had 24, and Penny Taylor sank two crucial free throws with 37.7 seconds left as the Mercury held off a late rally to win the intense series, 3-2. Tammy Sutton-Brown scored 22 points, and Jessica Davenport had a career-high 18 for Indiana in its first finals appearance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 24, 2014 | By Francesca Dominici, Michael Greenstone and Cass R. Sunstein
Last week, a divided court of appeals upheld what may well be the most important environmental rule in the nation's history: the Environmental Protection Agency's mercury standards. The regulation is expected to prevent up to 11,000 premature deaths, 4,700 heart attacks and 130,000 asthma attacks a year. Critics of the mercury rule have focused on its expense. The EPA estimates it will cost $9.6 billion a year, with most of the burden falling on electric utilities. Indeed, the issue of cost is what split the court.
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SCIENCE
November 22, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Mercury levels in women's blood are dropping, and not because they're eating less fish, a new study says. Instead, women appear to be eating smarter and choosing less contaminated varieties of seafood, according to a study released this week by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The analysis showed that blood mercury levels in women of childbearing age dropped by about one-third between 2001 and 2010 compared with 1999 and 2000. "There was very little change in the amount of fish consumed and mercury levels in fish tissue did not decline," said Betsy Southerland, director of the Office of Science and Technology in the EPA's water division.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Bob Dylan's mercurial words on religion and spirituality have been examined for decades. Scholars, cultural critics and theologians have speculated with their pens, parsing the songwriter's syllables as if they were grains of sand. Entire books have focused on his spiritual explorations, beginning with his Jewish roots, his sometime embrace of evangelical Christianity and beyond. For all the words, though, few have argued its point more thoroughly - and with fewer academic buzzwords - than Brothers & Sisters, a choir of Los Angeles session singers who in 1969 gathered at Sound Recorders Studios in Hollywood under the direction of Lou Adler to record an album of the most uplifting and spiritually inclined works in Dylan's early canon.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Gaps forming in seasonal Arctic sea ice may be creating a toxic conveyor belt, drawing mercury from higher altitudes to rain down on the ice, snow and tundra, according to a new study. The gaps, which come as the region shifts from perennial ice to thinner seasonal ice due to climate change, drive convection currents in the lower atmosphere that cycle mercury and ozone from higher levels toward Earth's surface, where oxidation converts the mercury into a more toxic form, according to the study published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2011 | By Dean Kuipers
Finally, some sanity regarding smokestack emissions. After decades of political squabbling, on Wednesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued its Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, or MATS, which will dramatically cut the amount of highly toxic mercury and about 70 other pollutants released in the United States. The rules target the emissions from coal-fired power plants. Mercury is the key element addressed by these rules, but it's only one of many chemicals -- plus fine particulate matter, which plays a role in asthma and other respiratory illnesses nationwide -- that are regulated by MATS.
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
It's a highly toxic element that travels the world in mysterious ways, respects neither manmade nor natural boundaries and rapidly accumulates in people and the food they eat. Mercury's risks for human and environmental health have slowly but steadily come to light over the centuries, leading to ad hoc phase-outs of mercury-filled thermometers, dental amalgam and the felt-hat-shaping compound that caused brain damage in 19 th century milliners, giving...
SCIENCE
August 1, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Children and women of childbearing age should not eat bass, carp and larger brown trout caught in California lakes and reservoirs because they contain unhealthy levels of mercury, according to a state health advisory issued Thursday. Instead, they should opt for wild-caught rainbow trout and smaller brown trout, which have less mercury and higher amounts of healthy Omega-3 fatty acids, the state Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment says. The agency also suggests women over 45 and men limit themselves to one serving per week of bass, carp or brown trout more than 16 inches long.
WORLD
October 24, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
French police suggested that mercury found in the car of a Russian lawyer who defends Kremlin foes was spilled accidentally. Karina Moskalenko has said she fears the mercury might have been planted to frighten or poison her. A Paris police official said the mercury in the car in Strasbourg, France, came from a barometer that broke while being transported by the car's previous owner, an antiques dealer.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
Prodded by consumer and dental activists, the Food and Drug Administration is reviewing the scientific evidence underlying its pronouncement less than 18 months ago that dental fillings containing mercury do not cause harm to patients. An advisory panel of outside experts will meet next week to reexamine the basis of the FDA's conclusions in the latest chapter of a lengthy battle with groups who believe the agency is understating possible links between the mercury in dental amalgam and neurological and other health problems.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Gaps forming in seasonal Arctic sea ice may be creating a toxic conveyor belt, drawing mercury from higher altitudes to rain down on the ice, snow and tundra, according to a new study. The gaps, which come as the region shifts from perennial ice to thinner seasonal ice due to climate change, drive convection currents in the lower atmosphere that cycle mercury and ozone from higher levels toward Earth's surface, where oxidation converts the mercury into a more toxic form, according to the study published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Susan King
Stars had faces in the golden age of Hollywood. And for many years, photographer George Hurrell, the father of the Hollywood glamour portrait, captured their allure, glamour and indefinable charisma. Known as the "Rembrandt of Hollywood," the groundbreaking photographer is the subject of "George Hurrell's Hollywood: Glamour Portraits 1925-1992," a biographical coffee-table book by writer-photographer Mark A. Vieira, who knew Hurrell for more than 15 years. Using interviews, archival documents and 20 years' worth of his own diaries, Vieira creates a portrait of a brilliant, complicated artist who had a great working relationship with the stars and a mercurial personality with studio chiefs.
SCIENCE
November 22, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Mercury levels in women's blood are dropping, and not because they're eating less fish, a new study says. Instead, women appear to be eating smarter and choosing less contaminated varieties of seafood, according to a study released this week by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The analysis showed that blood mercury levels in women of childbearing age dropped by about one-third between 2001 and 2010 compared with 1999 and 2000. "There was very little change in the amount of fish consumed and mercury levels in fish tissue did not decline," said Betsy Southerland, director of the Office of Science and Technology in the EPA's water division.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013
The company: Mercury General Corp. Headquarters: Los Angeles Ticker: MCY Employees: 4,600 Leadership: Gabriel Tirador, chief executive since 2007 2012 revenue: $2.8 billion 2012 net income: $117 million Stock price: $47.47 at Friday's close 52-week range: $36.03 to $51 P/E ratio: 20, based on estimated 2013 earnings Quarterly dividend: 61.5 cents a share, a current yield...
BUSINESS
November 17, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Opinions about Mercury General Corp. often depend on whether they're coming from investors or consumers. The Los Angeles automobile and homeowner insurance company has been at the center of repeated attempts to amend California's landmark Proposition 103, which made automobile insurance a more regulated industry. For more than a decade, Mercury's founder and chairman, George Joseph, has clashed repeatedly with consumer advocate Harvey Rosenfield, author of the landmark proposition, before the California Department of Insurance, the courts, the Legislature and on the ballot.
SCIENCE
October 28, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
The destructive environmental legacy of Gold Rush mining in the Sierra Nevada could last for thousands of years in the form of ongoing erosion of mercury-laced sediments, according to new research. Mercury, a toxic heavy metal, was used in copious amounts in California's hydraulic gold mining operations in the mid- and late 1800s. Miners blasted gold-bearing sediment out of vast, ancient gravel beds with water cannons. They then added liquid mercury to the slurry, allowing the gold-mercury amalgam to sink to the bottom of troughs.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - State regulators have ordered Mercury General Corp. to cut its homeowners insurance rates by 8.2%, instead of the increase in premiums that the company had sought. As a result, the Los Angeles insurer is contesting the ruling in court. The rate cut was announced by California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones. "The rate reduction provided for in this decision would offer much-needed financial relief for homeowners and would no doubt help consumers keep more of their hard-earned dollars in today's tight economy," Jones said in a statement Tuesday.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The San Jose Mercury News laid off 15 newsroom staffers and lost five other editors and reporters through resignations this week. The reductions leave the paper with 153 editorial staffers, according to the San Jose Newspaper Guild.
SPORTS
September 23, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
The Phoenix Mercury dealt the Sparks three of their four home losses this season, the final one being the knockout punch. The Sparks were eliminated from the playoffs Monday in a 78-77 loss to the Mercury in Game 3 of their best-of-three first-round series in front of an announced crowd of 9,321 at Staples Center. With the Sparks trailing, 76-75, Candace Parker drove to the basket and made a layup, giving them the lead with seven seconds left. Brittney Griner responded with a 15-foot turnaround jumper from the baseline with 4.9 seconds remaining and the Mercury advanced to the Western Conference finals for the first time since it won the WNBA championship in 2009.
SPORTS
September 20, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
At least Thursday began as a good day for Sparks forward Candace Parker. The WNBA announced that she won the most-valuable-player award in the early evening. It was downhill from there, as the Sparks lost, 86-75, to the Phoenix Mercury in Game 1 of the first round of the playoffs at Staples Center later that night. So much for a celebration. "We let it slip away," Parker said after scoring a team-high 28 points and grabbing eight rebounds. In front of an announced crowd of 8,500, including boxing champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Lakers guard Jodie Meeks, the Sparks fell apart in the third quarter.
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