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Meredith Phillips

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the black-white test score gap was first detected in data collected from World War I Army recruits, biological determinists claimed it proved that whites had a genetic edge on African Americans when it came to learning skills. Wrong, all wrong, argued some social scientists, who responded with data showing that the gap was rooted in social class and a variety of other circumstances. Ever since, those same arguments and challenges have raged in predictable 20-year cycles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the black-white test score gap was first detected in data collected from World War I Army recruits, biological determinists claimed it proved that whites had a genetic edge on African Americans when it came to learning skills. Wrong, all wrong, argued some social scientists, who responded with data showing that the gap was rooted in social class and a variety of other circumstances. Ever since, those same arguments and challenges have raged in predictable 20-year cycles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2004 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
Wanting to know what the mostly Asian American class considered desirable, professor Darrell Hamamoto asked: What posters are on your bedroom walls? After an uncomfortable silence, Hamamoto got the names he expected -- celebrities such as Brad Pitt. There wasn't an Asian among them, which reinforced what he has long believed: that cliches and stereotypes about Asian men have rendered them sexual afterthoughts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1999
Regarding your Feb. 11 articles on a rise in test scores and a return to teaching the basics: As a first-grade teacher, who for many years had to fight against the dogma that was whole language, I couldn't feel more vindicated. What is so disconcerting, however, is that the very same leaders and trainers in the education community who just a short time ago preached the evils of teaching the basics (as well as teaching in English to immigrant students) are now the ones preaching the opposite philosophy.
SPORTS
January 14, 1994 | MIKE DOWNEY
Suppose a paperback writer approached a publisher with a preposterous plot. The subject is skating. The scene is the Winter Olympics. A winsome young woman from New England is assailed by a crazed stranger before a performance. Unable to skate, she must sit helplessly as her nemesis, a saucy spitfire from the Pacific Northwest, spins, wins and grins. But when police investigate, the winner's ex-husband and bodyguard are accused of a conspiracy to hire the crazed stranger.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2007 | Jon Caramanica, Special to The Times
ON Monday's episode of "I Love New York"(VH1, 9 p.m.), Tiffany "New York" Pollard, the lovelorn urban belle around whom the show is based, kisses no fewer than five of the show's remaining contestants. In addition, two suitors give her an intense, oil-slick body rub, after which she admits, "I climaxed during that massage." In an earlier episode, New York accepted a massage and kiss from one competitor, then retreated to the hot tub, where she kissed a second, in front of a third.
OPINION
August 25, 2010 | By Bruce Fuller and Xiaoxia Newton
Imagine opening the morning paper over coffee and spotting your name on list of fellow nurses or lawyers, musicians or bus drivers. Beside each name rests a stark, lonely number said to gauge the extent to which you advance the growth of your clients or customers. Orwellian, perhaps. But 6,000 Los Angeles teachers will soon find their names on such a list. The Times has already published a few "value added" scores for illustrative teachers, detailing the eye-popping variability in learning curves of third- to fifth-graders spread across the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999
The expected chest-beating and soul-searching have followed the College Board report Tuesday that while overall SAT scores for white students rose one point last year, overall scores for black and Latino students stayed the same or declined. The widening gap highlights how public schools are leaving some children behind, failing to prepare them for college and economic success.
OPINION
September 7, 2010 | By Tiffani Chin and Meredith Phillips
With the recent unveiling of The Times' teacher and school "effectiveness" database , teachers and parents have asked us what to make of this information. Here's our advice. Teachers: I try my best to be an excellent teacher, and I'm always trying to improve. I really thought I was doing a good job. But The Times gave me an "average" value-added rating. Should I change how I teach now that I know I'm just "average"? No. You might actually be an excellent teacher — even just based on this limited measure of improving students' math and reading California Standards Test (CST)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1998 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the stately red brick campus of Hamilton High School, administrators are struggling to defuse tensions between African American parents who have accused the school of institutional racism and teachers who say they have been unfairly attacked. Two weeks ago, the Los Angeles Unified School District dispatched mediators to resolve the disputes at Hamilton, where the delicate balance of interracial coexistence has been upset. "We're in the middle of trying to solve a complex, emotional and volatile situation," Principal David Winter said.
BOOKS
November 2, 2003 | James Traub, James Traub is the author of several books, including "City on a Hill: Testing the American Dream at City College" and the forthcoming "The Devil's Playground: A Century of Pleasure and Profit in Times Square."
The single most devastating statistic in American life is this: The average black high school senior reads at the level of the average white eighth-grader. This, more than anything else, explains why race remains such an overwhelmingly salient fact in American life. It explains why affirmative action is, or at least appears to be, necessary. It explains to a very large degree why blacks continue to lag so far behind whites in income and socioeconomic status.
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