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BUSINESS
February 16, 1997
After reading professor Judy B. Rosener's attack on the idea of a "meritocracy" ("Standards of Meritocracy Don't Add Up," Times Board of Advisors, Feb. 2) in which she promotes the idea of "subjective standards," I have to wonder whose oxymoron will be gored if she gets what she wants. Although she says "it's possible to establish standards that consider subjective as well as objective criteria," how can you have "standards" that are not themselves objective? In fact, any system that does not include generally agreed-upon objective standards will be subject to the very same charges of prejudice, favoritism and cronyism that we all want to avoid.
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BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Speaking before a gathering of women in technology, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg recalled an uncomfortable exchange with two men on a different stage discussing the scarcity of women in the industry. One commented that he would like to hire more young women but not all are as competent as Sandberg. The other said he, too, would hire more young women but his wife fears he would sleep with them and, he confessed, he probably would. Sandberg's husband, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Dave Goldberg, told her later that night that the men did her a favor with their honesty.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 1997 | JUDY B. ROSENER, JUDY B. ROSENER IS A PROFESSOR IN THE Graduate School of Management of UC Irvine. She is the author of "America's Competitive Secret: Utilizing Women as a Management Strategy."
The term "meritocracy" has emerged as a hook upon which those who oppose affirmative action hang their argument. It is their contention that meritocracy--using "merit" as the only criterion for decisions about college admissions, job opportunities and government contracts--should be the driving force in addressing discrimination problems.
OPINION
July 22, 2012
Re "Thinkers or test takers?," Editorial, July 17 I am a recently retired high school social studies teacher. My students were required to do one research paper and one multimedia presentation each semester. I found that students learned more about areas of interest than they would have normally. After No Child Left Behind was enacted in 2002, I lost three to four weeks each year to drilling students on test questions. My evaluations centered on test scores, not actual student learning.
MAGAZINE
April 30, 1989
Interestingly, in "Standing Up to Japan" (March 12), James Fallows does not dwell on Japan but rather devotes most of his essay to attacking the American realization of a meritocracy. Furthermore, he argues that unless the trend toward stratification is reversed, it will be one cause of our society's economic decline. He laments the evidence of his thesis in the observance that "the best and the brightest" are flocking to the law and medicine. Certainly, it is unfortunate that the sciences, teaching and manufacture have taken a back seat to the more glamorous professions, but this is not a result of a highly efficient meritocracy.
OPINION
July 22, 2012
Re "Thinkers or test takers?," Editorial, July 17 I am a recently retired high school social studies teacher. My students were required to do one research paper and one multimedia presentation each semester. I found that students learned more about areas of interest than they would have normally. After No Child Left Behind was enacted in 2002, I lost three to four weeks each year to drilling students on test questions. My evaluations centered on test scores, not actual student learning.
OPINION
September 1, 2008
Re "Admitted but broke," Opinion, Aug. 24 The cost of college is staggering. However, the price range is broad. Zoe Mendelson worries that her middle-class friends cannot afford the pricier colleges. Affording only inexpensive institutions, according to Mendelson, "undermines the meritocracy that we claim as a nation." The truth is that her friends could learn just as much and likely would receive equivalent or, depending on their majors, better educations at less-expensive schools.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2010
Re: "Plan is raising banks' anxiety," Jan. 27: Manny Korman of Buckingham Research Group can't be serious when he says that large investment banks "are meritocracy-oriented organizations that like to have a free hand to make their own fortunes." The concept of meritocracy flew out the window when the Big Boys ran their companies into the ground, giving the federal government the choice of using our money to bail them out or allowing the entire U.S. economy to go into free fall.
OPINION
May 5, 1991 | Blaming President Bush's lack of leadership , the Citizens Commission on Civil Rights recently reported that there has been a rise in racial tension on college campuses throughout the country. BRIAN D. SMEDLEY, a Ph.D candidate at UCLA whose doctoral research examines how African-American students cope at predominantly white universities, told The Times:
Federal cutbacks in student aid, attacks on affirmative-action programs and the failure to adequately fund inner-city schools are all indicative of the Bush Administration's refusal to ensure equal access to higher education. Such policies serve to legitimize the perception of many white students that African-American, Chicano or Latino students have not really "earned" the right to participate in higher education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992 | R. RICHARD BANKS, R. Richard Banks is a Harvard Law School student
The collapse of a myth and the exposure of the secret it concealed reverberate through the venerable--and now it seems vulnerable--halls of Harvard Law School. Last month, 200 students and a third of the law school faculty met in a lecture hall for an "emergency" student-initiated forum. A week earlier, Harvard Law School students and faculty converged not on a classroom, but a courtroom--the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2010
Re: "Plan is raising banks' anxiety," Jan. 27: Manny Korman of Buckingham Research Group can't be serious when he says that large investment banks "are meritocracy-oriented organizations that like to have a free hand to make their own fortunes." The concept of meritocracy flew out the window when the Big Boys ran their companies into the ground, giving the federal government the choice of using our money to bail them out or allowing the entire U.S. economy to go into free fall.
OPINION
September 1, 2008
Re "Admitted but broke," Opinion, Aug. 24 The cost of college is staggering. However, the price range is broad. Zoe Mendelson worries that her middle-class friends cannot afford the pricier colleges. Affording only inexpensive institutions, according to Mendelson, "undermines the meritocracy that we claim as a nation." The truth is that her friends could learn just as much and likely would receive equivalent or, depending on their majors, better educations at less-expensive schools.
OPINION
October 7, 2005 | JONATHAN CHAIT
OF ALL THE despondent conservative reactions to Harriet E. Miers' Supreme Court nomination, my favorite came from National Review editor Rich Lowry, who quoted a source he described as a "very pro-Bush legal type." The source complained that Miers is "not even second rate, but third rate," and proceeded to despair that "a crony at FEMA is one thing, but on the high court it's something else entirely." The Supreme Court, you see, is important. What bad could come of having a crony at FEMA?
NEWS
June 22, 2003 | Thomas Wagner, Associated Press Writer
The informal potluck lunch had just begun at a gentrified farmhouse outside Oxford when that age-old British preoccupation with class surfaced. The parents were drinking cocktails, and many of our children from a local, private elementary school were playing rugby on a beautiful field of grass. Most of the adults had met each other at the school during Sunday services or at sporting events. That's why my wife was surprised to realize that an acquaintance was sneering at her clothes.
BOOKS
October 24, 1999 | ALAN WOLFE, Alan Wolfe is the director of the Center for Religion and American Public Life at Boston College and the author of "One Nation, After All."
Nicholas Lemann tells many fascinating stories in "The Big Test," and he tells them with an unusual combination of lively prose and discerning intelligence. But the subtitle of his book is misleading. The stories he relates are not all that secret, they do not add up to a coherent history and only some of them are about the American meritocracy. Just as democracy means the rule of the people, meritocracy means rule by the talented.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1997
After reading professor Judy B. Rosener's attack on the idea of a "meritocracy" ("Standards of Meritocracy Don't Add Up," Times Board of Advisors, Feb. 2) in which she promotes the idea of "subjective standards," I have to wonder whose oxymoron will be gored if she gets what she wants. Although she says "it's possible to establish standards that consider subjective as well as objective criteria," how can you have "standards" that are not themselves objective? In fact, any system that does not include generally agreed-upon objective standards will be subject to the very same charges of prejudice, favoritism and cronyism that we all want to avoid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1994 | JEFF DIETRICH, Jeff Dietrich is a longtime member of the Catholic Worker community in Los Angeles.
The pungent odor of feces wafts its way to the third floor as a reminder that Sarah is slowly dying down below, and I desperately hope that someone other than myself will take notice and change her diaper. Sarah will die any day now. Ravaged by stomach cancer that went undiagnosed for years as she self-medicated with street doses of heroin, Sarah lived on the sidewalk in a "cardboard condo" not far from our soup kitchen where she took her meals, her welfare check going to pay for her "medicine."
OPINION
October 7, 2005 | JONATHAN CHAIT
OF ALL THE despondent conservative reactions to Harriet E. Miers' Supreme Court nomination, my favorite came from National Review editor Rich Lowry, who quoted a source he described as a "very pro-Bush legal type." The source complained that Miers is "not even second rate, but third rate," and proceeded to despair that "a crony at FEMA is one thing, but on the high court it's something else entirely." The Supreme Court, you see, is important. What bad could come of having a crony at FEMA?
BUSINESS
February 2, 1997 | JUDY B. ROSENER, JUDY B. ROSENER IS A PROFESSOR IN THE Graduate School of Management of UC Irvine. She is the author of "America's Competitive Secret: Utilizing Women as a Management Strategy."
The term "meritocracy" has emerged as a hook upon which those who oppose affirmative action hang their argument. It is their contention that meritocracy--using "merit" as the only criterion for decisions about college admissions, job opportunities and government contracts--should be the driving force in addressing discrimination problems.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | ROBERT SCHEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back at his retreat on Martha's Vineyard, where he headed directly after San Diego, the last stop on his national book tour, Robert Strange McNamara must be satisfied. After a month of talks shows, speeches and interviews, his book was solidly at the top of the bestseller list, and none of his critics had landed a glove.
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