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OPINION
September 16, 1990
Iraq at least did the headline writers a favor in changing its name to its present four-letter word. It used to be Mesopotamia. FRANCIS RAYMOND LINE Capistrano Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 18, 2007 | Adam Shatz, ADAM SHATZ is literary editor of the Nation.
THIS TIME AROUND, when the Bush administration presented "intelligence" from unidentified sources about a dangerous foe in the Middle East, the American media was noticeably more skeptical. Eager to redeem themselves for the generally obsequious reporting about Saddam Hussein's alleged weapons of mass destruction and ties to Al Qaeda, journalists don't want to get fooled again as the administration lays the groundwork for a possible war against Iran.
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NEWS
January 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Teams excavating at the site of the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud in northern Iraq have come across 4,000-year-old items, including ivory sculptures and ornamented daggers, a newspaper reported Monday. Also unearthed were a wall and the remains of what could have been a tower, according to Al Thawra. The newspaper did not say when the discovery was made. Nimrud is 17 miles south of Mosul, the third-largest city in Iraq, which was known in ancient times as Mesopotamia.
WORLD
December 29, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi and Louise Roug, Times Staff Writers
The myth of a unified Iraqi identity may have finally been laid to rest this month. More clearly than any other measurement since the U.S.-led 2003 invasion, preliminary results from the Dec. 15 parliamentary elections show Iraq as three lands with three distinct identities, divided by faith, goals, region, history and symbols. Iraqis of all stripes say they are the descendants of Mesopotamia, the glorious great-grandchildren of the cradle of civilization.
OPINION
February 18, 2007 | Adam Shatz, ADAM SHATZ is literary editor of the Nation.
THIS TIME AROUND, when the Bush administration presented "intelligence" from unidentified sources about a dangerous foe in the Middle East, the American media was noticeably more skeptical. Eager to redeem themselves for the generally obsequious reporting about Saddam Hussein's alleged weapons of mass destruction and ties to Al Qaeda, journalists don't want to get fooled again as the administration lays the groundwork for a possible war against Iran.
WORLD
December 29, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi and Louise Roug, Times Staff Writers
The myth of a unified Iraqi identity may have finally been laid to rest this month. More clearly than any other measurement since the U.S.-led 2003 invasion, preliminary results from the Dec. 15 parliamentary elections show Iraq as three lands with three distinct identities, divided by faith, goals, region, history and symbols. Iraqis of all stripes say they are the descendants of Mesopotamia, the glorious great-grandchildren of the cradle of civilization.
BOOKS
September 2, 1990 | JACK MILES
Daniel Patrick Moynihan's "On the Law of Nations," to be published on Sept. 12 by Harvard University Press, is the companion, if not quite the sequel, to his 1988 "Came the Revolution: Argument in the Reagan Era" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). The two deal, respectively, with foreign and domestic affairs. Both claim that the conservatism of the Reagan-Bush years has been the wreckage, not the restoration, of American traditions.
NEWS
November 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The massive stone sculpture -- part bull, part bird, part man -- was designed to instill awe among those approaching the king's throne room in the ancient Mesopotamian city of Dur-Sharrukin. It still inspires awe, even in the relatively smaller confines of the Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | LEON BARKHO, REUTERS
An idled brick factory and nylon sheets flapping in the wind above a Mesopotamian ruin are symbols of the collapse of Iraq's efforts to save its ancient cultural heritage. Hampered by a lack of cash and crippled by Gulf War sanctions, Iraqi scholars and conservation experts say they are losing the battle to save what is left of the Mesopotamian civilization of 6,000 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
If anything good has come of wartime pillage in Iraq, it's a vastly increased appreciation for the nation's cultural heritage. That point is made in the new book "The Looting of the Iraq Museum, Baghdad: The Lost Legacy of Ancient Mesopotamia." And Donny George, director of the embattled museum, couldn't agree more. "Many people did not know about Iraq," George said, speaking by cellphone from Baghdad.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | Antonio Castaneda, Associated Press Writer
More than 2,000 years ago, this thriving Mesopotamian oasis welcomed caravans of camels carrying travelers between East and West, twice held back Roman invaders, and was famous for its tolerance of different religions. Now Hatra sits in ruins in a vast desert. Parts of its giant temples, columns and arches remain standing under the incessant sun, but its city center is probably visited by more rabbits than people.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
If anything good has come of wartime pillage in Iraq, it's a vastly increased appreciation for the nation's cultural heritage. That point is made in the new book "The Looting of the Iraq Museum, Baghdad: The Lost Legacy of Ancient Mesopotamia." And Donny George, director of the embattled museum, couldn't agree more. "Many people did not know about Iraq," George said, speaking by cellphone from Baghdad.
NEWS
November 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The massive stone sculpture -- part bull, part bird, part man -- was designed to instill awe among those approaching the king's throne room in the ancient Mesopotamian city of Dur-Sharrukin. It still inspires awe, even in the relatively smaller confines of the Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | LEON BARKHO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Iraqi archeologists are striving to bring to light what they describe as Mesopotamia's largest "city of graves," where the Sumerians buried their dead nearly 5,000 years ago. The scientists are stunned by the size of the cemetery and say much more work needs to be done to determine what role it played in ancient times. "We have never excavated anything like it before. It is unprecedented," said Fadhil Abdulwahid, a Baghdad University archeologist.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | LEON BARKHO, REUTERS
An idled brick factory and nylon sheets flapping in the wind above a Mesopotamian ruin are symbols of the collapse of Iraq's efforts to save its ancient cultural heritage. Hampered by a lack of cash and crippled by Gulf War sanctions, Iraqi scholars and conservation experts say they are losing the battle to save what is left of the Mesopotamian civilization of 6,000 years ago.
OPINION
September 16, 1990
Iraq at least did the headline writers a favor in changing its name to its present four-letter word. It used to be Mesopotamia. FRANCIS RAYMOND LINE Capistrano Beach
BOOKS
September 3, 1989 | David Graber, Graber is a research biologist with the National Park Service.
As we proceed to demolish the last great forests on Earth in the tropics of both Africa and America, it is easy to believe this catastrophic event is a novelty. True enough, the global congruence of overpopulation, industrialism and deforestation are novel, but it is equally apparent that history has much to say about the symbiosis of civilization and its forests.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | Antonio Castaneda, Associated Press Writer
More than 2,000 years ago, this thriving Mesopotamian oasis welcomed caravans of camels carrying travelers between East and West, twice held back Roman invaders, and was famous for its tolerance of different religions. Now Hatra sits in ruins in a vast desert. Parts of its giant temples, columns and arches remain standing under the incessant sun, but its city center is probably visited by more rabbits than people.
BOOKS
September 2, 1990 | JACK MILES
Daniel Patrick Moynihan's "On the Law of Nations," to be published on Sept. 12 by Harvard University Press, is the companion, if not quite the sequel, to his 1988 "Came the Revolution: Argument in the Reagan Era" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). The two deal, respectively, with foreign and domestic affairs. Both claim that the conservatism of the Reagan-Bush years has been the wreckage, not the restoration, of American traditions.
BOOKS
September 3, 1989 | David Graber, Graber is a research biologist with the National Park Service.
As we proceed to demolish the last great forests on Earth in the tropics of both Africa and America, it is easy to believe this catastrophic event is a novelty. True enough, the global congruence of overpopulation, industrialism and deforestation are novel, but it is equally apparent that history has much to say about the symbiosis of civilization and its forests.
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