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Metabolism

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2000
Ross Coleman Bean, 76, biochemist and research scientist for Ford Aerospace and Communications Corp. Born in Thatcher, Ariz., and educated at UC Berkeley and Stanford University, Bean taught biochemistry at UC Riverside, where he performed lauded research on sugar metabolism in citrus fruits. He joined Ford in 1963 and in 1974 became a principal research scientist in its Aeronautic Division.
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HEALTH
May 8, 2000 | CAROL KRUCOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In today's weight room, you're as likely to see a grandmother working her glutes as a quarterback working his quads, now that resistance exercise is recognized as vital to building strong muscles and bones. But the American Heart Assn. says pumping iron is also good for that most important of muscles--the heart.
HEALTH
March 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
The mother's story mixes heartache with anger: Her seemingly healthy 8-month-old baby died suddenly one morning. No warning, just a panicked phone call from the baby-sitter that Jim had quit breathing. Doctors called it Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. But Jamie Lazzaro later discovered her baby instead had suffered from a genetic metabolic disease--a treatable one, if only the hospital had run a simple $25 test to detect it when Jim was born.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Women who have trouble metabolizing the vitamin folic acid are at a higher risk of having children with Down syndrome, a discovery by government researchers that raises the question of whether folic acid supplements might fight the syndrome. Expectant mothers with a genetic abnormality that hinders how the body processes folic acid were 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Athletes are limited in how far they can run, cycle or swim, not by the restrictions of bone or muscle but because major organs use too much energy. The liver, kidneys and the stomach are the key to controlling metabolism, biologists Jared Diamond and Kimberly Hammond of UCLA report in the April 3 issue of the journal Nature. They said the most any person can increase metabolism is about fivefold. To see why they could not go beyond that, the scientists checked the metabolic rates of 50 animals.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Surprisingly skinny mice created in a Seattle genetics lab may offer hints at why some people can eat all they want and still stay thin. Researchers have found that with a single genetic alteration, they can turn up a natural metabolic furnace in mice so the animals burn more fat. Experts said people might eventually be able to control their weight by doing the same thing, or by exploiting related processes.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Canadian researchers have discovered a set of genes that determine the life span of the common nematode, a finding that sheds new light on the aging process and that may eventually allow them to delay the inexorable processes of decay and death. By manipulating the newly discovered genes, the team at McGill University in Montreal was able to increase the life span of the nematode worms fivefold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Humans are much more sensitive to light than previously thought and show bodily responses even to dim indoor lamps, according to Harvard scientists. Two reports in Nature indicate that it could be easier to treat jet lag and other disorders of the 24-hour circadian rhythm than doctors have believed. In one study, researchers exposed young male volunteers to varying levels of indoor light and measured their body temperatures to see how they responded.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the second time in less than a year, researchers have pinpointed a genetic flaw that makes people fat. Three international teams of researchers reported Thursday that they have identified a common defect in a gene that regulates how fast the body burns calories. Those with the bad gene tend to grow potbellies and develop diabetes earlier in adulthood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995
Whatever happened to taking responsibility? In the final paragraph of your article (March 9), Dr. Rudolph Leibel states "the take-home message is that (obesity) is not a question of willpower or behavior." Unfortunately, Leibel seems to have misrepresented the results of his own study. Perhaps it was to ease the pain of the true message: that exercise plays the major role in maintaining muscle mass and raising metabolism. In avoiding emphasizing this aspect of his study, Leibel does a great disservice to millions of obese individuals who could successfully lose and keep off the body fat if they took the appropriate action.
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