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Metal Detectors

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1993
The recent purchase of metal detectors by Buena Park schools--launching the first such detection program by a school district in Orange County--was a signal that parents and school officials are becoming increasingly alarmed about violence on campus. No wonder. Since last September, there have been at least eight shootings on or near campuses in Orange County, and other parts of Southern California are facing even worse problems.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1999 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you are headed to court this week, prepare to check your bag at the door. A $1.2-million overhaul of courthouse security kicked into action Monday morning as authorities for the first time required that people entering the Hall of Justice be screened for weapons on the first floor. While some courthouse employees groused about the long lines leading up to new metal detectors and X-ray machines, authorities said they received few complaints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1989 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
Metal detectors have been installed this week at two key entry points to Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center in Watts to screen out weapons carried into the hospital by growing numbers of "violent and unruly individuals," hospital officials said Wednesday. Up to 60 gang members at a time have converged on the 430-bed county hospital to visit their wounded friends or to intimidate rivals, said Robert Eason, the hospital's chief of safety police.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | Jake Doherty / Times community correspondent
Barry Stone: Senior, Crenshaw High School "I don't think it will make a big difference. There are so many ways to get into our school and someone could throw a gun over the fence to their friend. I know a few people who bring in guns. People have to make up their own minds, they have to want to stop bringing in guns for anything to change. A lot of people have fear in their heart that someone is going to harass them and a gun is the only protection they have.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday authorized the installation of a metal detector at the public entrance to its ornate meeting chambers as the latest security step at City Hall. But the council has still not decided the more delicate issue of when the detection equipment will actually be used to screen visitors. "The council has not yet decided when it ought to be fired up," said John Cotti, assistant general manager for security at the Department of General Services.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thing about Sandy Crawford is, she seems normal. Housewife, mother of two, sunny personality. So why would she go out to the beach with a metal detector like . . . one of them? Codgers in Sansabelt slacks and Hush Puppies, nothing better to do--human anteaters snagging the lost trinkets of beach-goers. She laughs at the picture. She felt the same way when her firefighter husband first got the detecting bug.
NEWS
January 26, 1993 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Responding to the classroom shooting of two students at Fairfax High School last week, the Los Angeles Unified School District will begin using metal detectors to randomly screen students for weapons at high school entrances within a week, Supt. Sid Thompson announced Monday. Thompson said the district will use hand-held detectors in a pilot program to screen students on a random basis at three to five schools each day. The searches will shift from school to school, with no notice to students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call him prescient; call him paranoid. Either way, City Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr. was right. During a debate Wednesday over security at City Hall, the councilman said he knew exactly how the news media would spin the story. He predicted that today's accounts of the lawmakers' 8-2 vote would read: The Los Angeles City Council took a bold step toward protecting the public Wednesday by deciding to protect itself first. "I know that's going to be the article," Svorinich said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1993 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inglewood schools Supt. George J. McKenna says he has reluctantly decided to ask the school board to approve metal detectors at the high schools and junior highs in an effort to keep guns off the campuses. "I'm offended by the need to use metal detectors," McKenna said, "but I'm realistic enough to believe that I have to have them given the state of the times." School officials said guns have been confiscated and students expelled for carrying them. Thomasina M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Permanent metal detectors will be installed at the shared entrance to the Magic Mountain and Hurricane Harbor theme parks, officials with the parks' operator, Six Flags, announced Friday. By December, all visitors to the adjacent Valencia parks will be required to pass through the high-tech screening devices to help ensure no weapons find their way inside, officials said.
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