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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Wednesday postponed consideration of an agreement with the city of Los Angeles that would have required the agency to secure federal funding by 1999 to build an east-west subway across the San Fernando Valley. The move is the first public indication of MTA staff and board members' concerns that the recent dramatic cutback in federal funding could cause a serious delay in the extension of the Metro Rail Red Line subway west from North Hollywood.
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REAL ESTATE
July 27, 2003 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
Drawing card Home prices from about $275,000 to $400,000 attract first-time and move-up buyers to the revitalized city. Community redevelopment funds for the 740-acre North Hollywood Redevelopment Project have provided 1,050 new housing units so far, including senior housing, residential assistance programs, commercial facade improvements and rehabilitation efforts. The project also has brought 1,131 jobs to the area.
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NEWS
November 7, 1991
City officials say the first part of the Metro Rail Red Line subway will open in June, 1993, three months earlier than expected. The leg of the subway runs from Union Station through downtown to the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Alvarado Street. Plans for the Red Line through Hollywood will be unaffected. That leg is estimated to open by 1998, Metro Rail spokeswoman Roberta Tinajero said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Wednesday postponed consideration of an agreement with the city of Los Angeles that would have required the agency to secure federal funding by 1999 to build an east-west subway across the San Fernando Valley. The move is the first public indication of MTA staff and board members' concerns that the recent dramatic cutback in federal funding could cause a serious delay in the extension of the Metro Rail Red Line subway west from North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
A ranking official of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission said Friday the commission will urge transit district leaders to look closely at other ways to save money on the troubled Metro Rail subway project before taking the drastic step of terminating contracts. "It is important to sit down with a contractor and resolve an issue before taking a drastic step like this," said Richard Stanger, director of rail development for the county commission, which is providing 14% of the $1.25 billion needed for the first, 4.4-mile segment of the subway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Wednesday quietly postponed consideration of an agreement with the city of Los Angeles that would have required the agency to secure federal funding by 1999 to build an east-west subway across the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Orange County's commuter rail passengers are seeing red over the transfer fee they must currently pay to use the new, Metro Rail Red Line subway in downtown Los Angeles. Seeking relief, more than 360 passengers from the Orange County Transportation Authority's lone commuter train signed protest petitions on Monday and Tuesday. "It's not the money so much as it is the inconvenience," Kurt Walker, a computer operator from Fullerton, said of the 25-cent transfer charge, which will rise to $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1993 | JAMES WATT McCORMICK and ABRAHAM FALICK and DOROTHY GREEN, James Watt McCormick, a developer, is former president of the Westside Urban Forum; Abraham Falick, a planning economist, founded the Coalition for Rapid Transit; Dorothy Green founded Heal the Bay and is a Department of Water and Power commissioner. This article represents their opinions only.
Economists, environmentalists and developers don't often join forces to enforce environmental laws. But the stakes for all Los Angeles in the western extension of the Metro Rail Red Line are high enough to compel our joint action in the public interest. The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission recently certified environmental documentation to take the subway from Western Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard down to Pico and San Vicente boulevards.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Compared to the rest of the Los Angeles subway project, this underground job looked simple: Finish the carpentry, tiling and other details of the depot at historic Union Station. But simple it was not. By the time the station opened for passengers early this year, taxpayers had paid the contractor 81% more than the competitively bid price. Costs for the nearby Civic Center station and tunnels ran 45% over the original contract.
REAL ESTATE
July 27, 2003 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
Drawing card Home prices from about $275,000 to $400,000 attract first-time and move-up buyers to the revitalized city. Community redevelopment funds for the 740-acre North Hollywood Redevelopment Project have provided 1,050 new housing units so far, including senior housing, residential assistance programs, commercial facade improvements and rehabilitation efforts. The project also has brought 1,131 jobs to the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Wednesday quietly postponed consideration of an agreement with the city of Los Angeles that would have required the agency to secure federal funding by 1999 to build an east-west subway across the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Compared to the rest of the Los Angeles subway project, this underground job looked simple: Finish the carpentry, tiling and other details of the depot at historic Union Station. But simple it was not. By the time the station opened for passengers early this year, taxpayers had paid the contractor 81% more than the competitively bid price. Costs for the nearby Civic Center station and tunnels ran 45% over the original contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Orange County's commuter rail passengers are seeing red over the transfer fee they must currently pay to use the new, Metro Rail Red Line subway in downtown Los Angeles. Seeking relief, more than 360 passengers from the Orange County Transportation Authority's lone commuter train signed protest petitions on Monday and Tuesday. "It's not the money so much as it is the inconvenience," Kurt Walker, a computer operator from Fullerton, said of the 25-cent transfer charge, which will rise to $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1993 | JAMES WATT McCORMICK and ABRAHAM FALICK and DOROTHY GREEN, James Watt McCormick, a developer, is former president of the Westside Urban Forum; Abraham Falick, a planning economist, founded the Coalition for Rapid Transit; Dorothy Green founded Heal the Bay and is a Department of Water and Power commissioner. This article represents their opinions only.
Economists, environmentalists and developers don't often join forces to enforce environmental laws. But the stakes for all Los Angeles in the western extension of the Metro Rail Red Line are high enough to compel our joint action in the public interest. The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission recently certified environmental documentation to take the subway from Western Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard down to Pico and San Vicente boulevards.
NEWS
November 7, 1991
City officials say the first part of the Metro Rail Red Line subway will open in June, 1993, three months earlier than expected. The leg of the subway runs from Union Station through downtown to the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Alvarado Street. Plans for the Red Line through Hollywood will be unaffected. That leg is estimated to open by 1998, Metro Rail spokeswoman Roberta Tinajero said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
A ranking official of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission said Friday the commission will urge transit district leaders to look closely at other ways to save money on the troubled Metro Rail subway project before taking the drastic step of terminating contracts. "It is important to sit down with a contractor and resolve an issue before taking a drastic step like this," said Richard Stanger, director of rail development for the county commission, which is providing 14% of the $1.25 billion needed for the first, 4.4-mile segment of the subway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1999
I was interested to read on Sept. 29 ("Relocation of Bus Yard OKd by Board") about the Los Angeles Board of Education voting to relocate buses from a parking lot. One of their main concerns was the diesel fumes' effect on nearby students. I live near the Metro Rail Red Line Universal station. They plan a large bus transfer and layover plaza within two blocks of our neighborhood. Residents of Studio City and specifically homeowners in our adjacent residential area have expressed our concerns about noise and fumes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999
Metro Rail's Red Line is super, smooth, safe, streamlined and today [June 13], the ride was free. Los Angeles can feel justly proud. I'm one of thousands of passengers who enjoyed the 19-minute excursion from Hollywood and Vine to Union Station, stopping to view stations down the line. Too bad Metro Rail didn't operate Metro Link trains [during opening] weekend. That certainly would have eased the journey for San Fernando Valley dwellers. As it was, I traveled on three buses from Tarzana to reach the new station at Hollywood and Vine.
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