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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1994 | RICH SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that is likely to raise the cost of building Los Angeles' first subway, the City Council Tuesday told the Metropolitan Transportation Authority what it wants done to safeguard Hollywood before tunneling resumes on the Metro Rail Red Line project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key House committee voted Wednesday to allocate $110 million for construction of the Los Angeles Metro Rail system next year--considerably less than the subway's proponents had sought but more than enough to keep the project on track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying the transportation industry has the greatest opportunity for creating new jobs, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Federico Pena on Thursday visited a public-private consortium in Burbank designed to help develop an electric vehicle industry in Southern California. Pena, who is in Los Angeles to award more than $1 billion in federal grants to extend the city's Metro Rail Red Line subway, called the CALSTART consortium a model for other public-private partnerships nationwide to emulate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Southern California Rapid Transit District officials said Thursday they are examining a controversial proposal to terminate certain contracts connected with the Los Angeles Metro Rail project as part of an effort to reduce escalating costs of the 4.4-mile-long first segment of the subway line. The disclosure, which angered representatives of a contractors' group involved in the $1.25-billion project, came after the RTD's Board of Directors approved operating and capital budgets totaling $1.14 billion for fiscal 1989-90.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997 | JON D. MARKMAN and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The chairman of the MTA's powerful construction committee vowed Wednesday to hold a hearing to determine whether the agency's decision two years ago to monitor safety with its own staff rather than with consultants is working. "We didn't like the way it was done by outsiders, so it's worthwhile to look at how we are doing," county Supervisor Gloria Molina said during the agency's monthly board meeting, which adjourned in honor of deceased tunnel worker Jaime Pasillas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1995 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 75 people rallied at Metropolitan Transit Authority headquarters Wednesday, protesting that two years of digging and dynamiting subway tunnels in the hills above Hollywood and Studio City will endanger their homes and the environment. "This project has more to do with ego trips than passenger trips," said State Sen. Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica), a subway critic who organized the rally. The MTA is scheduled to fire up two boring machines in February to burrow twin 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are supposed to be driving downtown office workers to the new Metrolink trains. But operators of Metrolink shuttle buses being used in Los Angeles each evening are also driving freeway motorists up the wall. The reason? Clumps of up to 15 empty Metrolink buses at a time have begun fighting with evening commuters for scarce, rush-hour space on the Hollywood Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine of the busiest blocks of Hollywood Boulevard were closed to traffic Saturday and an apartment building was evacuated after water seepage in the Metro Rail's Red Line tunneling project and ground settling along the famed street. Construction crews were working Saturday night to shore up the ground around two subway tunnels under Hollywood Boulevard near Hudson Avenue and to find the source of the water leaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan lobbied President Clinton at the White House on Thursday as Congress began to tackle the Administration's crime bill, a potential source of funds for the mayor's ambitious plan to hire thousands more police officers. After meeting with Clinton in the Oval Office, Riordan emerged upbeat and said the President understood the city's law enforcement needs. "Los Angeles has to be a top priority for the Administration," Riordan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2003 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Plans are underway to develop new housing and retail space in Chinatown -- in a possible collaboration with former Los Angeles Laker Earvin "Magic" Johnson. "What we have done is lay the foundation for what will be an exciting mixed-use project," said Los Angeles City Councilman Ed Reyes, whose district includes Chinatown. "This addresses a high priority in Chinatown."
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