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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A longstanding battle between a small legal newspaper and the presiding judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court escalated Thursday when the judge filed a lawsuit in his own court that accuses the publisher of fraud, deceit and false impersonation. In his lawsuit, Presiding Judge Ricardo A. Torres accuses Metropolitan News-Enterprise publisher Roger M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2010 | By Jack Leonard
A retired Los Angeles County judge who ordered that a lawyer be paid in $10 gift cards from a women's fashion store as part of a legal settlement was censured Tuesday and barred from presiding over court cases. The Commission on Judicial Performance accused Brett C. Klein of showing bias, abusing his authority and "grandstanding to the press" in a class-action lawsuit that he briefly presided over last year. The lawsuit accused a clothing store chain of violating privacy laws by asking for personal identification information when customers used credit cards to make purchases.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small legal newspaper that has been engaged in a running feud with the presiding judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court has sued the judge in his own court, alleging that he abused his authority by ordering the detention of three newspaper employees who distributed a memo that lampooned him. The lawsuit, filed Friday, is the latest twist in a contentious yearlong battle between Presiding Judge Ricardo A.
OPINION
May 11, 2002
Statements in L.A. County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley's May 8 letter concerning the invasion of the Metropolitan News-Enterprise's offices on May 2 are false. Jo-Ann Grace had agreed to send copies of our business records to a district attorney's investigator relating to three legal advertisements we had published. The agreement was predicated on a subpoena being sent. We did not renege on our agreement because no subpoena was ever provided. Instead, a search warrant was served--something at which any newspaper would balk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993
A Los Angeles legal affairs newspaper published salaries of Municipal and Superior court officials Tuesday after winning a legal battle for disclosure of their wages and benefits. The Metropolitan News-Enterprise requested the information in June, 1992, and Superior Court Judge Donald E. Smallwood ruled last month that, under the 1st Amendment, the public has a right to know the wages.
OPINION
May 11, 2002
Statements in L.A. County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley's May 8 letter concerning the invasion of the Metropolitan News-Enterprise's offices on May 2 are false. Jo-Ann Grace had agreed to send copies of our business records to a district attorney's investigator relating to three legal advertisements we had published. The agreement was predicated on a subpoena being sent. We did not renege on our agreement because no subpoena was ever provided. Instead, a search warrant was served--something at which any newspaper would balk.
OPINION
May 8, 2002
Re "The D.A.'s Press Attack," editorial, May 4: District attorney investigators went to the Metropolitan News-Enterprise offices with a judicially authorized warrant to obtain an invoice showing that a local law firm paid for a legal notice of a recall election in South Gate. All the publishers had to do was turn over relevant business documents, which were sought as part of a broad political corruption probe. Beginning last month, D.A.'s office staff members spoke with Metropolitan News' co-publisher Jo-Ann Grace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2010 | By Jack Leonard
A retired Los Angeles County judge who ordered that a lawyer be paid in $10 gift cards from a women's fashion store as part of a legal settlement was censured Tuesday and barred from presiding over court cases. The Commission on Judicial Performance accused Brett C. Klein of showing bias, abusing his authority and "grandstanding to the press" in a class-action lawsuit that he briefly presided over last year. The lawsuit accused a clothing store chain of violating privacy laws by asking for personal identification information when customers used credit cards to make purchases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1994 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presiding judge was not amused. There, in a memo on Los Angeles Superior Court letterhead no less, he was pompously describing himself as "a judicial officer with august status" who was suspending "the election of my successor until such time as I determine it to be appropriate to hold such election."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1994 | EDWARD J. BOYER
The last two causes of action in a Los Angeles Superior Court judge's suit against a small legal newspaper have been dismissed. Judge Ricardo A. Torres had sued the Metropolitan News for libel, among other allegations, after employees of the paper circulated a memo at the County Courthouse lampooning Torres, who was then presiding judge.
OPINION
May 8, 2002
Re "The D.A.'s Press Attack," editorial, May 4: District attorney investigators went to the Metropolitan News-Enterprise offices with a judicially authorized warrant to obtain an invoice showing that a local law firm paid for a legal notice of a recall election in South Gate. All the publishers had to do was turn over relevant business documents, which were sought as part of a broad political corruption probe. Beginning last month, D.A.'s office staff members spoke with Metropolitan News' co-publisher Jo-Ann Grace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1994 | EDWARD J. BOYER
The last two causes of action in a Los Angeles Superior Court judge's suit against a small legal newspaper have been dismissed. Judge Ricardo A. Torres had sued the Metropolitan News for libel, among other allegations, after employees of the paper circulated a memo at the County Courthouse lampooning Torres, who was then presiding judge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1994 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presiding judge was not amused. There, in a memo on Los Angeles Superior Court letterhead no less, he was pompously describing himself as "a judicial officer with august status" who was suspending "the election of my successor until such time as I determine it to be appropriate to hold such election."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993
A Los Angeles legal affairs newspaper published salaries of Municipal and Superior court officials Tuesday after winning a legal battle for disclosure of their wages and benefits. The Metropolitan News-Enterprise requested the information in June, 1992, and Superior Court Judge Donald E. Smallwood ruled last month that, under the 1st Amendment, the public has a right to know the wages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A longstanding battle between a small legal newspaper and the presiding judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court escalated Thursday when the judge filed a lawsuit in his own court that accuses the publisher of fraud, deceit and false impersonation. In his lawsuit, Presiding Judge Ricardo A. Torres accuses Metropolitan News-Enterprise publisher Roger M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small legal newspaper that has been engaged in a running feud with the presiding judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court has sued the judge in his own court, alleging that he abused his authority by ordering the detention of three newspaper employees who distributed a memo that lampooned him. The lawsuit, filed Friday, is the latest twist in a contentious yearlong battle between Presiding Judge Ricardo A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Iowa's rejection of three state supreme court justices who ruled in favor of same-sex marriage underscored the growing electoral vulnerability of state judges as more and more are targeted by special interest groups, legal scholars and jurists said Thursday. "It just illustrated something that has been troubling many of us for many, many years," California Chief Justice Ronald M. George said. "The election of judges is not necessarily the best way to select them. " The three Iowa high court justices were ousted in the kind of retention election California uses for appeals court judges: They face no opposing candidates and list no party affiliation, and voters can select "yes" or "no. " Legal scholars have generally said that system is among the most effective ways of avoiding a politicized judiciary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
For a sampling of what critics say are the inherent flaws in electing judges, look no further than the duel for Office No. 38 of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. The incumbent is sometimes referred to derisively as the "bagel lady," a nod to the bakery she and her husband ran when she ousted a sitting judge in 2006. Her opponent has vied unsuccessfully for a trial court spot — three times — and was involved years ago in an odd dust-up over his TV appearance on the "Love Connection.
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