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Mexican American

OPINION
June 27, 2010 | David Alire Garcia
In the long-running contest to win Latino voters' hearts and minds, the Republican Party jumped out to a stunning lead this month. And for a party saddled with leaders displaying more than a few retrograde impulses these days — on immigration and even the landmark Civil Rights Act — that's no small accomplishment. Consider the recent string of Latino Republicans to triumph in GOP primaries in three states over the last few weeks: In California, appointed Lt. Gov. Abel Maldonado won his six-way Republican primary with 43% of the vote and the right to fight for a full term this fall.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2010 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
The Mexican flag is back on the streets of Los Angeles after several years of political exile. Four years ago, Miguel Haro was among half a million people who marched for immigrant rights in downtown L.A. At the urging of organizers and Spanish-language disc jockeys, he left his Mexican flag at home and waved an American flag instead. Concerned that the Mexican flag carried the wrong message, Mexican American political leaders and other activists launched a largely successful effort to have people at public events, particularly protest marches, wave the American flag, believing it to be a better symbol for their case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Sal Castro went from classroom to jail cell. The Eastside social studies teacher was branded a dangerous agitator in the press — held responsible for inciting thousands of teenagers to march out of school. The district attorney slapped a bunch of conspiracy charges on him. The Board of Education voted him out of his job. All that was 42 years ago. Fast forward to Saturday, when Sal Castro will stand with Los Angeles Unified School District dignitaries and cut the ribbon at a brand-new campus: Salvador B. Castro Middle School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2010 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
One is a Pentecostal, mostly African American congregation of 22,000, led by a world-renowned bishop with global ministries that extend to Africa and Haiti. The other is one of the largest Latino evangelical churches in the city, whose Spanish-language ministries serve more than 4,000 members, most of them Salvadoran and Mexican immigrants and their children. Located just four blocks apart along Crenshaw Boulevard in South Los Angeles, the two mega-churches — West Angeles Church of God in Christ and Iglesias de Restauracion — had never broken bread together, as cultural and linguistic differences kept them apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
The odds against them were daunting for the motley team of Mexican schoolkids who somehow won the 1957 Little League World Series. They were almost as steep for the filmmakers behind "The Perfect Game," which opened Friday and relates the tale of the scrappy, undersized team's improbable triumph. Initially, the movie's shooting was plagued by fits and starts. At one point production closed down entirely and had to be relaunched. Then Lionsgate, after slating the film for release way back in July 2008, held the movie from theaters because its original backers reportedly had run short of cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
The Vatican's choice of a Mexican-born archbishop, Jose Gomez of San Antonio, as the next prelate of Los Angeles reflects the formal acknowledgment of a remarkable, decades-long shift in the center of gravity of the U.S. Roman Catholic Church -- from Northeast to Southwest, from Eurocentric to Latino-dominated. The 58-year-old Gomez has the potential to reshape the Archdiocese of Los Angeles over most of the next two decades, assuming he can successfully steer it past the shoals of a lingering sexual abuse crisis.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
History, it's often been observed, is written by victors, which might explain why an especially compelling chapter of the Mexican-American War remains so infrequently told, at least in the U.S. The chapter in question is about the San Patricios, a company of Irish immigrants pressed into service by the U.S. Army. Ideologically opposed to the fight, they switched sides, choosing to stand alongside the Mexican military rather than the forces of their newly adopted homeland. When the conflict ended, the members of the battalion were executed for their desertion.
OPINION
January 24, 2010 | By Gustavo Arellano
For many foodies and their lefty amigos, Taco Bell belongs in the pantheon of all-time anti-Mexican conspiracies -- a notch below Lou Dobbs but more onerous than the swine flu. These custodians of cuisine and culture rail against the fast-food behemoth, bemoan how it mongrelizes one of the world's great food traditions with its chalupas and enchiritos, its Volcano Menu and cheese roll-ups. The chain's ubiquity makes it just another foot soldier in corporate America's drive toward nationwide blandness, they'll argue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2010 | By Hector Becerra
Bobby Salcedo grew up in El Monte, his immigrant parents staking the family's future in the working-class suburb that felt worlds away from the Mexican farming towns of their roots. But like so many Mexican Americans, some of Salcedo's fondest memories were from the winter and summer vacations when his family would pack into the van and drive 1,300 miles south to the lands of their ancestors in Jalisco. The pace of life slowed there, with children hanging out in town plazas late into the night and young men handing flowers to pretty girls as they strolled in opposing circles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2010 | Elaine Woo
Joe R. Nevarez, a copy boy turned reporter for the Los Angeles Times who broke barriers as one of the newspaper's first Mexican American staff writers, died of natural causes Tuesday at his Monterey Park home, according to his daughter Margaret Nevarez. He was 97. A founding member of the California Chicano News Media Assn., Nevarez joined The Times as a copy boy in 1930 and began earning bylines in the early 1950s as a reporter in the business section. He specialized in coverage of the oil industry and corporate earnings over the next 26 years, until his retirement in 1977.
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