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Mexican Americans

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OPINION
July 2, 2013 | By Helen B. Marrow and Tomás R. Jiménez
Now that the Senate has passed its immigration bill, the future of reform lies in the hands of the GOP-led House, where the debate will center on allowing a path to citizenship for 11 million immigrants living in this country without legal status. Opponents of this path often claim that low-skilled Mexicans, who make up the largest subgroup, are not fitting into U.S. society - that they don't want to assimilate and are fated to remain a permanent underclass. Solid evidence suggests these claims are untrue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 5, 2014 | David E. Hayes-Bautista
Thanks to a recent ruling from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, high school students in the Morgan Hill Unified School District south of San Jose won't be allowed to wear American flag T-shirts on Cinco de Mayo. That's too bad. The flags of both the United States and Mexico belong in any celebration of Cinco de Mayo, because it is, at its heart, a Mexican American holiday. The ban was instituted a year after hostilities broke out at Live Oak High School during a Cinco de Mayo celebration.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2000 | AGUSTIN GURZA
For once, the camera is on comedian Paul Rodriguez and he's not trying to be funny. He's just talking. He's doing a sit-down interview for a television documentary on Mexican Americans. So he gets off the stand-up shtick, turns down the show-biz volume and reveals a real person beneath the comic mask. He even lets himself shed a tear. Just one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | David Colker
Bill Davila, a first-generation Mexican American who worked his way up from sweeping floors at a Vons market to being president of the supermarket chain, knew that some executives in the industry were not sure how to pronounce his last name. Was it the Spanish DAH-vee-la or the Anglicized duh-VIL-a? Davila, who was also the genial spokesman for Vons in TV and radio commercials, was used to walking in both worlds. "I'll respond to either pronunciation," he said in a 1987 Los Angeles Times interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996
Re "Mexican, American as a Single Identity," by Leticia Quezada, Commentary, Dec. 16: Leticia Quezada's column on the benefits of dual citizenship for Americans of Mexican origin treats citizenship as a game rather than a commitment. They leave Mexico for the United States because they find here a society that treats them better and offers economic opportunities, health care, education and public services they could not find in their own country. And now they want dual citizenship so they can choose what they want in both countries?
OPINION
May 19, 2002
I am sympathetic to Patrick Osio's idea that the priorities of Mexican immigrants and their children often differ (Commentary, May 3). Yet, as a Mexican American, I know that questions of identity, culture and loyalty are not settled simply. Mexican Americans may spend summers in small villages with their Mexican grandparents, and return in the fall to American history courses at their universities. They feel at home in both places. I believe that they must have a right to both identities, to both languages, to both nations.
BOOKS
October 31, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, Patrick J. McDonnell is a Times reporter who has written about Latino issues. He is currently assigned to the Mexico City bureau
At the core of Peter Skerry's detailed study is an incendiary hypothesis: Self-promoting Mexican-American "leaders," attuned to the discordant rhythms of "strident minority politics" now embedded in the U.S. system, are directing Mexican-Americans down a treacherous path of identification as an oppressed minority more akin to African-Americans than other immigrant groups.
OPINION
April 6, 2004
Re "Addition to the Melting Pot Requires a New Recipe Book," Commentary, April 2: Jorge Castaneda writes that "Mexicans ... have a major challenge," and that is to regard "our compatriots in the U.S. as part of a Mexican nation in the cultural and ethnic sense." How about this for a major challenge: Stop having babies that you can't feed and have no jobs for! America is not the dumping ground for the Third World. Mike Burns Bakersfield When Mexico has reversed its immigration to the U.S., as Ireland has reversed its immigration, then a comparison between Irish and Mexican immigration will be valid.
OPINION
July 30, 2000 | Gregory Rodriguez, Gregory Rodriguez, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a Los Angeles-based fellow at the New America Foundation
Were it not for Latinos, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, George W. Bush, would have no credible claim to being a "compassionate conservative." Were it not for his outreach efforts, nobody would be calling Latino voters the soccer moms of the 2000 campaign. In large part, Bush's reputation as an inclusive politician stems from his onetime success in garnering 40% of the Mexican American vote in his home state of Texas.
OPINION
November 12, 2006 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ, GREGORY RODRIGUEZ is an Irvine senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
HOMOGENIZING the image of the "other" has always been a way for groups to marginalize undesirable minorities and foreigners. Two dozen centuries ago, Hippocrates wrote that the Scythians -- nomadic people whom the Greeks considered barbaric -- all looked alike. By contrast, the good doctor could discern that his own people came in all shapes and sizes. To refuse to make distinctions among members of any given group is the first step to stripping them of individuality.
SPORTS
December 6, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
ADRIAN GONZALEZ , 31, first base Final 2013 stats: .293 batting average, 22 home runs, 100 RBI, 32 doubles, 69 runs, and .342 on-base and .461 slugging percentages, while playing in 157 games. Contract status: Under contract for another five years and $110 million. The good: Dodgers' most consistent hitter. Taking in the entire course of the season, was still probably their MVP. Led the team in homers, RBI, runs, hits (171), and was second in doubles (by one to Andre Ethier)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
The assignment seemed perfect for me. I was a Mexican American college student in Washington and was asked to get cosponsors for a bill that would create a month-long observance honoring the achievements of Latinos - National Hispanic Heritage Month. I had already spent five months as an intern for Democrat Jaime B. Fuster, Puerto Rico's delegate to Congress. Through connections, I lined up a second internship with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. It was May 1988 and an exciting time to be in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
Frank Martinez laid his shaking hands on the surface of the blank canvas. As before every painting, he said a prayer. Then the artist began his work. He applied acrylic paint and, with a rag, wiped it away. Shapes began to form and colors blended into one another. He used a piece of wood to draw straight lines, a task complicated by Parkinson's disease. Slowly, the mural took form, a layered portrait of early 18th century life, mission-building and Catholic faith in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Raymond Rodriguez was 10 years old in 1936 when his immigrant father walked out of the family's Long Beach farmhouse and returned to Mexico, never to see his wife and children again. The son would spend decades pondering the forces that had driven his father away, an effort that reached fruition in "Decade of Betrayal," a social history of the 1930s focusing on an estimated 1 million Mexicans and Mexican Americans unjustly deported or scared into leaving their homes in the United States by federal and local officials seeking remedies for the Great Depression.
OPINION
July 2, 2013 | By Helen B. Marrow and Tomás R. Jiménez
Now that the Senate has passed its immigration bill, the future of reform lies in the hands of the GOP-led House, where the debate will center on allowing a path to citizenship for 11 million immigrants living in this country without legal status. Opponents of this path often claim that low-skilled Mexicans, who make up the largest subgroup, are not fitting into U.S. society - that they don't want to assimilate and are fated to remain a permanent underclass. Solid evidence suggests these claims are untrue.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Mexican art and Mexican American art often have treated each other more like strangers or distant cousins than like the fraternal twins they really are. In the United States, apart from in California and the Southwest, many museums and art professionals until relatively recently tended to isolate or ignore Mexico's contributions to global movements such as Modernism or Conceptual and performance art. Similarly, in Mexico, U.S. Chicano art of...
NATIONAL
March 23, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - Arizona lawmakers passed a law to dismantle a Mexican American studies program in Tucson schools, but the legislation has had an unintended effect: The controversy is renewing interest in the state and nationwide in ethnic studies and Chicano and Latino literature. Some Tucson students have found new ways to study the subject while receiving college credit to boot. Others who had no interest on the topic say they are now drawn to the material. "Underground" libraries with Chicano literature are popping up across the Southwest and are set to open soon in unexpected places such as Milwaukee and Louisville.
OPINION
March 15, 2013
Officials in Arizona have spent an awful lot of time and effort in recent years trying to make immigrants uncomfortable. Most widely debated have been the state's efforts to empower police to enforce federal immigration laws, but the schools have become a battleground as well. Atty. Gen. Tom Horne authored a law - directed at schools in Tucson - that outlawed certain ethnic studies programs, along with banning classes that promote racial resentment, encourage ethnic identity or, for good measure, advocate the overthrow of the U.S. government.
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