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Mexican Border

NATIONAL
July 20, 2009 | Kate Linthicum
This city in the foothills of the Rockies has scenery more diverse than most Hollywood back lots: A 19th century castle, a Spanish colonial plaza and miles of prairie and mountains. That landscape -- along with New Mexico's generous film incentives -- has lured more than a dozen movie productions here in the last decade. The filming has brought in a surge of money, but it has also brought tension.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
SAN YSIDRO - Two eternal truths about crossing the Mexican border: It's worth the drive to Rosarito Beach for Tacos El Yaqui. And coming back is hell. In the last several years, crossing the border from the Mexican side has become a test of nerves. Two-, three-, even four-hour waits are typical. As you burn gas, jockey for position in the lanes and swerve to avoid the vendors and begging children who weave on foot between cars, you are consumed by feelings of helplessness and rage that cannot be assuaged by all the striped blankets, Sponge Bob piƱatas and plaster Last Suppers in the world.
NEWS
May 30, 1989
The battle against illegal drugs and aliens has left unexpected casualties near the Mexican border: flat-tailed horned lizards flattened by off-road U.S. Border Patrol vehicles. Bureau of Land Management officials allege that Border Patrol agents not only kill the lizards but disregard off-limits signs and barriers, destroying archeological finds up to 10,000 years old in the Yuha Basin. The Yuha area, 25 miles north of the Mexican border, is one of four desert areas where the lizards live.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
BISBEE, Ariz. - For the last 20 years, they have descended on the sun-bleached desert lands in southeastern Arizona near the Mexican border. Longtime locals say they damage irrigation lines, tread on land without permission, alienate merchants and contribute to a sense of unease that didn't use to exist. But lately these complaints are aimed not so much at people arriving illegally from Mexico as they are at the federal forces sent to stop them. Residents say the deployment of hundreds of agents - armed, uniformed and omnipresent - and millions of dollars in new infrastructure have created a military-like occupation in their once-sleepy hamlets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1991 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL
Tourists and visitors to Mexico during the holiday season will be able to obtain temporary vehicle importation permits at the Mexican Consulate in Oxnard beginning today, consul officials said. The permits, which last six months, are required of everyone, regardless of nationality, who crosses the Mexican border with a vehicle registered outside that country. In the past, the permits could only be obtained at border crossings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
Two men who led police on a high-speed car chase from Anaheim to the Mexican border were shot and injured by Mexican federal officers before being taken into custody, police said Saturday. The chase began shortly after midnight when Anaheim police tried to pull over a car being driven erratically near Beach Boulevard and Ball Road, Sgt. Rick Martinez said. The vehicle was chased onto the I-5, where the California Highway Patrol joined the pursuit, Martinez said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1987 | Lily Eng \f7
U.S. Border Patrol agents arrested 707 people, mostly undocumented aliens, in a seven-hour operation Sunday at the San Clemente checkpoint, authorities said Monday. Most of the undocumented aliens were Mexican nationals who were arrested between 4 p.m. and 11 p.m. at the Interstate 5 checkpoint, Border Patrol Supervising Agent Wayne Kirkpatrick said. Kirkpatrick said those arrested were taken by bus to the Mexican border and dropped off near Tijuana.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2008
Talk-show hosts John Kobylt and Ken Chiampou of KFI-AM (640) will host a screening of the documentary "Border" on Tuesday as a fundraising event for imprisoned former U.S. Border Patrol agents Ignacio Ramos and Joseph Compean. The men were convicted in 2006 of a variety of charges stemming from firing shots at a suspected drug smuggler on the Mexican border. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion about immigration policies with Mexico, featuring "Border" filmmaker Chris Burgard; T.J. Bonner, president of the National Border Patrol Council; and others.
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