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Mexican Elections

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1997
Re Carlos Fuentes' "Death of the Witch of Fear," Commentary, July 10: I would like to share observations and impressions about the recent Mexican elections. I joined a group of 25 volunteers who traveled to Mexico to observe the elections. Global Exchange of San Francisco organized this with Alianza Civica, an independent, plural and nonpartisan organization that works to promote the democratization of Mexico. I was fortunate to be sent to Chiapas and then transported by truck to the Lacandon jungle.
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WORLD
November 26, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Through most of the administration of Mexican President Felipe Calderon, the federal police agency has held a starring role, built to seven times its previous size and favored by American advisors and dollars despite persistent troubles and scandals. But President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto, who is meeting Tuesday with President Obama, has already demonstrated that one of his immediate actions will be to demote the police force, raising questions about his security policies at a time of heightened deadly violence across the country.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2004 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
In 1996, Mexico granted its citizens who live in the United States the right to cast absentee ballots, instantly creating a bloc of nearly 11 million potential voters. Eight years later, many of those voters, frustrated that a balloting mechanism hasn't been created, are restless and rallying for action. Mexican politicians who reluctantly adopted the voting change have delayed its implementation because "they fear us," said Santa Ana tax preparer and immigrant activist Guadalupe Gomez.
OPINION
July 20, 2012 | By León Krauze
At the beginning of May, with a couple of months to go until the Mexican elections, I interviewed Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the presidential candidate of the leftist Democratic Revolutionary Party. We spoke for more than an hour, most of which he devoted to his usual talking points about how today's Mexico is a cabal of rich men who operate in cahoots with a corrupt political system obsessed with self-preservation. I had heard it all before, as had the Mexican electorate, which rejected Lopez Obrador's bid for the presidency last month, giving the victory to his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, opponent, Enrique Peña Nieto, by more than 6 percentage points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2000
Re "Fox Vows Better Ties With Mexican Immigrants in U.S.," Nov. 11: Mexican President-elect Vicente Fox's idea to create congressional seats in the Mexican Congress to represent the 7 million immigrants who reside in the U.S. violates U.S. territorial sovereignty. Fox needs to understand that the Mexican government's authority stops at the border. A system of absentee voting similar to that which the United States has should be adequate to allow Mexican nationals to vote in Mexican elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2000
In "Fox's Tunnel Vision of U.S. Mexicans" (Opinion, July 16), David R. Ayon writes: "If the president-elect understood that Mexican children are jamming into classrooms across the U.S., he might realize that it would be more helpful for their parents to become American citizens and voters rather than retain their franchise for Mexican elections." To dot the "i," Ayon should have mentioned the benefits of dual citizenship, which makes it legal for one to become a U.S. citizen without denouncing his or her original, in this case Mexican, citizenship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1994 | ANTONIO OLIVO and MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bringing to an end nearly a year of political confusion, the Mexican elections concluded Monday with the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) retaining the power it has claimed since 1929. PRI candidate Ernesto Zedillo won the presidency with 50.03% of the vote. Cynical observers, sensing fraud, have staged protests in Mexico City over the manner in which the elections were held.
NEWS
November 11, 2000 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican President-elect Vicente Fox's brief visit to Los Angeles this week underscored his determination to create a new and expanded role within Mexico for the millions of Mexican immigrants in the United States. In a meeting Thursday night with representatives of the Mexican immigrant community, Fox vowed that Mexican lawmakers will give serious consideration to two long-standing pleas from Los Angeles' immigrants. The first is to allow Mexican immigrants in the United States to cast absentee ballots in Mexican elections.
OPINION
July 20, 2012 | By León Krauze
At the beginning of May, with a couple of months to go until the Mexican elections, I interviewed Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the presidential candidate of the leftist Democratic Revolutionary Party. We spoke for more than an hour, most of which he devoted to his usual talking points about how today's Mexico is a cabal of rich men who operate in cahoots with a corrupt political system obsessed with self-preservation. I had heard it all before, as had the Mexican electorate, which rejected Lopez Obrador's bid for the presidency last month, giving the victory to his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, opponent, Enrique Peña Nieto, by more than 6 percentage points.
WORLD
September 23, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
For days, Mexican police ringed Congress in an odd cat-and-mouse game, trying to catch Julio Cesar Godoy before he could get inside to take office as a federal deputy. The mouse won. On Thursday, Godoy popped up inside Congress and was quickly sworn in by the president of the Chamber of Deputies, thus gaining immunity from prosecution on 2009 drug-trafficking charges. Godoy, a member of the leftist Democratic Revolution Party, or PRD, from the western state of Michoacan, was elected to Congress in July 2009.
WORLD
July 3, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
Mexicans vote Sunday, but the biggest story may be how many don't bother. At stake are all 500 seats in the lower house of Congress, six governorships and scores of local posts. But apathy and disgust with politics are rampant. Many voters plan to deface their ballots in protest. Every campaign, however, offers moments that are memorable, incongruous, weird. Here are a few tidbits from Mexico, the 2009 edition. The name says green, but the stance is pure red meat.
OPINION
September 20, 2006
Re "Independence, spoiled," editorial, Sept. 18 It is clear The Times would prefer that all Mexicans quietly accept the continuation of the same regime that has kept them in poverty. Indeed, intellectual Cuauhtemoc Cardenas won the election in 1988 but did not have the courage to do what the most recent presidential challenger, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, is doing. Cardenas failed the Mexican people then, and he fails again by not supporting Lopez Obrador. Mexicans want progress, but not the kind of progress that will keep them poor.
WORLD
June 18, 2006 | Hector Tobar and Paul Richter, Times Staff Writers
When an estimated 40 million Mexican voters go to the polls next month to pick their next president, the result could affect the lives of 296 million people north of the border. A victory by leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on July 2 would add an emphatic exclamation point to a series of Latin American elections that has seen voters roundly reject the "Washington consensus," the model that emphasizes fiscal discipline and pro-market policies.
WORLD
February 7, 2005 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Mexico's main leftist party appeared to be winning two gubernatorial races Sunday, wresting the southern state of Guerrero away from its longtime rulers and keeping control of Baja California Sur in a boost for the party's prospects in next year's presidential election.
WORLD
August 2, 2004 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
The Institutional Revolutionary Party, which ruled Mexico for most of the 20th century, was battling to retake Tijuana and cling to the governorship of Oaxaca as voters cast ballots Sunday in state and local elections that could shape the 2006 presidential race. After an evening of counting, both contests looked too close to call and were generating disputes over alleged irregularities that could take days to resolve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2004 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
In 1996, Mexico granted its citizens who live in the United States the right to cast absentee ballots, instantly creating a bloc of nearly 11 million potential voters. Eight years later, many of those voters, frustrated that a balloting mechanism hasn't been created, are restless and rallying for action. Mexican politicians who reluctantly adopted the voting change have delayed its implementation because "they fear us," said Santa Ana tax preparer and immigrant activist Guadalupe Gomez.
WORLD
July 5, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Gift-giving by Mexican political parties to sway votes is a time-honored tradition, one for which grandmother Ana Maria Senturion, her arms full of plastic kitchenware and toys after a party rally Wednesday, is grateful. She had muscled her way through thick crowds to snag plates, a washtub and a Batman doll handed and thrown out to the thousands gathered at the Institutional Revolutionary Party's closing campaign ceremony on the Campeche waterfront.
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