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OPINION
June 29, 2012
Re "Don't fear a PRI win," Opinion, June 24 Jorge G. Castañeda practically equates the likely triumph of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, in Sunday's presidential election with the ultimate validation of the democratic achievements of the Mexican people. I view the PRI's return another way: the ultimate corroboration of how economic power can impose a candidate despite the democratic aspirations of the Mexican people. David Soto West Hills ALSO: Letters: Fighting polio in Pakistan Letters: A fair deal for online poker Letters: Historical ruling on healthcare  
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WORLD
September 8, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
MEXICO CITY - Tens of thousands of Mexicans jammed the center of their capital city Sunday to protest President Enrique Peña Nieto's plan to allow foreign firms to invest in and collaborate with the state-run oil company, whose independence from outside influence has been a source of national pride for decades. The city government estimated that 44,000 people crowded downtown's Avenida Juarez to hear the anti-reform arguments of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the two-time presidential candidate and de facto leader of the Mexican left.
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NEWS
September 22, 1985 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
First Lady Nancy Reagan will briefly visit earthquake-devastated Mexico City on Monday as an expression of U.S. sympathy for the disaster that besets its southern neighbor, although the State Department pointedly warned others to stay home. Her plans were announced Saturday by President Reagan in his weekly radio broadcast, just hours after Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams harshly criticized Henry Cisneros, the Democratic mayor of San Antonio, for making such a trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Journalist Alfredo Corchado has had a front seat to many of the most important events of recent Mexican history. In the 1980s he covered the protests in Northern Mexico that foreshadowed the end of one-party rule, and he was later a Mexico City correspondent for the Dallas Morning News. In 2000, he conducted the first interview with President-elect Vicente Fox, the opposition candidate who broke the ruling party's 71-year hold on power. And when Mexico's organized crime groups went on a killing spree in the first years of this century, Corchado was among a handful of U.S. reporters working high-level sources inside the U.S. and Mexican governments, trying to make sense of what was going on. Now Corchado has written a memoir based on his experiences: "Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent Into Darkness.
OPINION
August 10, 2003
Re Mexican migratory labor, the U.S. and Mexico have had it both ways for a long time ("Mexican ID a Veiled Bid for Amnesty," Commentary, Aug. 6). Mexico has availed itself of its neighbor's superior economy while evading responsibility for strengthening its own; whole sectors of the U.S. economy depend on this labor influx to keep wage costs down as government largely ignores the legal status of these immigrants. Edward J. Erler and Scot J. Zentner's concerns about security and the potential for abuse in the matricula consular program are well founded.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Journalist Alfredo Corchado has had a front seat to many of the most important events of recent Mexican history. In the 1980s he covered the protests in Northern Mexico that foreshadowed the end of one-party rule, and he was later a Mexico City correspondent for the Dallas Morning News. In 2000, he conducted the first interview with President-elect Vicente Fox, the opposition candidate who broke the ruling party's 71-year hold on power. And when Mexico's organized crime groups went on a killing spree in the first years of this century, Corchado was among a handful of U.S. reporters working high-level sources inside the U.S. and Mexican governments, trying to make sense of what was going on. Now Corchado has written a memoir based on his experiences: "Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent Into Darkness.
WORLD
March 10, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - They elected a youthful president, a self-styled defender of democratic principles who promised to bring the country up to 21st century standards. But many Mexicans suspected that an old-fashioned dinosaur heart was beating beneath Enrique Peña Nieto's smartly tailored suits, an inheritance from his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, whose top-down, quasi-authoritarian rule defined much of Mexico's 20th century history. On Sunday, after 100 days of living under Peña Nieto's rule, the Mexican people have a better idea of the ways in which their 46-year-old president, and his vintage political party, plan to manage the future of the United States' southern neighbor, a country rife with promise and peril.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | WAYNE A. CORNELIUS, Wayne A. Cornelius is research director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies UC San Diego. He observed the Mexican elections in the state of Yucatan under the auspices of the Frente Civico Familiar
"Take the gift, but vote as you please." That was the advice dispensed to the Mexican people by opposition party candidates in the campaign just ended, as well as by the head of the independent Federal Electoral Institute, or IFE. But the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, incessantly delivered a starkly different message: "We've helped you; now you help us!" Whose advice would the voters take?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scores of deaf Mexican nationals allegedly recruited to sell trinkets in New York City were probably smuggled into the United States via San Diego and then taken to Los Angeles before being transported east, according to federal authorities and court papers. In interviews with investigators, victims have described being recruited in Mexico, spirited across the border into Southern California and later taken on airplanes or buses to New York.
WORLD
August 4, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Wednesday delivered an uncommonly blunt and dispiriting assessment of the broad sway held by violent drug traffickers throughout the besieged country. From the "most modest little towns" to major cities, Calderon said, traffickers attack, intimidate and blackmail Mexican citizens as part of an illegal business that goes far beyond the simple transport of narcotics. "Their business is no longer just the traffic of drugs. Their business is to dominate everyone else," Calderon said.
WORLD
March 10, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - They elected a youthful president, a self-styled defender of democratic principles who promised to bring the country up to 21st century standards. But many Mexicans suspected that an old-fashioned dinosaur heart was beating beneath Enrique Peña Nieto's smartly tailored suits, an inheritance from his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, whose top-down, quasi-authoritarian rule defined much of Mexico's 20th century history. On Sunday, after 100 days of living under Peña Nieto's rule, the Mexican people have a better idea of the ways in which their 46-year-old president, and his vintage political party, plan to manage the future of the United States' southern neighbor, a country rife with promise and peril.
OPINION
June 29, 2012
Re "Don't fear a PRI win," Opinion, June 24 Jorge G. Castañeda practically equates the likely triumph of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, in Sunday's presidential election with the ultimate validation of the democratic achievements of the Mexican people. I view the PRI's return another way: the ultimate corroboration of how economic power can impose a candidate despite the democratic aspirations of the Mexican people. David Soto West Hills ALSO: Letters: Fighting polio in Pakistan Letters: A fair deal for online poker Letters: Historical ruling on healthcare  
WORLD
August 4, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Wednesday delivered an uncommonly blunt and dispiriting assessment of the broad sway held by violent drug traffickers throughout the besieged country. From the "most modest little towns" to major cities, Calderon said, traffickers attack, intimidate and blackmail Mexican citizens as part of an illegal business that goes far beyond the simple transport of narcotics. "Their business is no longer just the traffic of drugs. Their business is to dominate everyone else," Calderon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2010 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Tucked away inside of one of Los Angeles' oldest buildings, the artist could be mistaken for a squatter. He sleeps on a ragged piece of carpet. He makes do without a shower. He wears nearly the same clothes every day: a plain T-shirt and worn-out sweat shorts. But around the corner from where he sleeps is Hugo Martinez Tecoatl's masterpiece: an elaborate array of murals vibrantly splashed across 4,000 square feet of space. Aztec gods, bicycles, serpents, marigolds and tributes to Pancho Villa, Benito Juarez and Emiliano Zapata stretch from the hardwood floor up 30- to 40-foot walls and across the ceiling.
WORLD
May 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The U.S. Treasury Department on Thursday banned Americans from doing business with six Mexican companies and 12 people it said were fronts for the Sinaloa drug cartel. It said the companies and individuals were involved in the operations of Ismael Zambada, identified as "one of Mexico's most powerful drug kingpins." The department's action also freezes any of their U.S. assets. The Nino Feliz day care center in Culiacan is one of the institutions banned.
OPINION
August 10, 2003
Re Mexican migratory labor, the U.S. and Mexico have had it both ways for a long time ("Mexican ID a Veiled Bid for Amnesty," Commentary, Aug. 6). Mexico has availed itself of its neighbor's superior economy while evading responsibility for strengthening its own; whole sectors of the U.S. economy depend on this labor influx to keep wage costs down as government largely ignores the legal status of these immigrants. Edward J. Erler and Scot J. Zentner's concerns about security and the potential for abuse in the matricula consular program are well founded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1989 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a professor of political science at the National Universityof Mexico.
The "ditch crisis" in U.S.-Mexican relations will probably not go down in the annals of binational relations as one of the more substantive confrontations between the two countries. But it does illustrate the complexities and contradictions of Mexican-American ties. To begin with, there is confusion about the origin of the proposal to construct a ditch along the Otay Mesa area of the U.S.-Mexican border, just east of Tijuana.
MAGAZINE
January 26, 1986 | MARC COOPER and GREG GOLDIN, Marc Cooper and Greg Goldin are Los Angeles writers.
Gaston Garcia Cantu, 68, is a noted Mexican historian, author and journalist. His outspoken analysis and criticism of government affairs have made his column in the daily newspaper Excelsior one of the most widely read in Mexico. He was interviewed in Mexico City, which is still littered with rubble from the Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2002 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Northern California immigrant farmer who staged a triumphant return to his hometown in Mexico and won a mayoral election, only to see it overturned amid furious protests, said Sunday that he has given up his fight for the office. But the battle to change Mexican politics has just begun, Andres Bermudez said from his home near Sacramento. "I was going to start change, but they did not let me do it," said Bermudez, who entered the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | WAYNE A. CORNELIUS, Wayne A. Cornelius is research director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies UC San Diego. He observed the Mexican elections in the state of Yucatan under the auspices of the Frente Civico Familiar
"Take the gift, but vote as you please." That was the advice dispensed to the Mexican people by opposition party candidates in the campaign just ended, as well as by the head of the independent Federal Electoral Institute, or IFE. But the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, incessantly delivered a starkly different message: "We've helped you; now you help us!" Whose advice would the voters take?
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