Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMexicans
IN THE NEWS

Mexicans

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Fans of Mexican Coke have been dismayed , saddened and angered  at recent reports that their beloved soda's key ingredient -- cane sugar -- will be replaced with old-fashioned corn syrup.  But fear not, the Mexican bottler that exports Coke to the U.S. assures consumers the soda's recipe won't be tinkered with, the Associated Press reported Wednesday. The outcry began when news outlets such as Quartz reported that executives from Arca Continental, the Mexican bottler, suggested in an earnings call that it would move to use cheaper sweeteners after the Mexican government imposed a new tax on soda.  Other news sites followed suit and soon enough, social media was awash with consumers who said they would soon begin hoarding cases of Mexican Coke.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
LOS ALGODONES, Mexico - Osvel Hinojosa knew that an infusion of water would bring the Colorado River delta back to life. But in just a few days, a U.S.-Mexican experiment to revive the delta environment has exceeded his expectations. The water is running deeper, faster and wider than anticipated in a channel that was once bone-dry. Hinojosa has spotted hawks, egrets and ospreys flying above the newly flowing water. He's even seen beavers. "It's just amazing to see that we can recover the river and see it alive again," said Hinojosa, water and wetlands program director at Pronatura Noroeste, a Mexican water conservation group.
Advertisement
OPINION
September 20, 2006
Re "Independence, spoiled," editorial, Sept. 18 It is clear The Times would prefer that all Mexicans quietly accept the continuation of the same regime that has kept them in poverty. Indeed, intellectual Cuauhtemoc Cardenas won the election in 1988 but did not have the courage to do what the most recent presidential challenger, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, is doing. Cardenas failed the Mexican people then, and he fails again by not supporting Lopez Obrador. Mexicans want progress, but not the kind of progress that will keep them poor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Richard Marosi
California has emerged as the major gateway for methamphetamine into the country, with Mexican organized crime groups smuggling an estimated 70% of the U.S. supply through state border crossings, according to a report released Thursday by state Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris. The 98-page report on trends in transnational organized crime also cites maritime smuggling, money laundering and criminal alliances between Mexican drug cartels and Southern California gangs as growing public safety threats.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Last month, after years of futile goose-chasing, Mexican authorities captured the country's most-wanted criminal, the powerful Sinaloa drug cartel boss Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán. But another legendary Mexican desperado remains at large after 40 years, haunting the fantasies of an adoring public. She's Camelia la Texana, a comely San Antonio ingenue turned drug-smuggling queen who shot and killed her lover in a jealous rage. At least that's her story as immortalized in "Contrabando y Traición" ("Contraband and Betrayal")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996
The commentary by Jorge Castaneda of May 8 and your editorial of the same day lament Mexico's apparently insurmountable economic problems, which are highlighted by a 50% inflation rate, 2 million people unemployed, an ever-rising crime rate and uncontrollable illegal immigration to the United States. But, neither article nor editorial identifies the cause of the problems or suggests a remedy. Mexicans are victims of Catholic dogma, which forbids them from practicing birth control. As a consequence, their population increased from 17 million in 1930 to 91 million in 1995; it doubled in the last 28 years, and at this rate it is expected to double again in the next 40 years.
WORLD
January 26, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Adios, Heydar Aliyev, late strongman of distant Azerbaijan. Now that your statue has been hauled away from the Paseo de La Reforma, the Mexican capital's grand boulevard, where will Mexicans go now when they want to meditate on your legacy of KGB membership, fraudulent elections and human rights violations? Early Saturday, in the darkness sometime after midnight, Mexico City officials wrapped up the bronze statue of Aliyev, the ruler of Azerbaijan from 1993 to 2003, and ferried it away on a truck.
WORLD
April 19, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Lomas de Chapultepec, a neighborhood of huge homes behind high stone and brick walls, wakes up each morning to the sound of sweeping. As the dawn's dark fades to light, servants emerge from behind gates and, with witches' brooms, brush away the leaves and twigs and lavender jacaranda petals that have fallen overnight. Maids in pastel uniforms, security guards, gardeners and chauffeurs — these are the public denizens of this super-rich enclave. The actual homeowners and permanent residents are rarely seen.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2012 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - Tourism officials here have long lured visitors and their dollars to the region with images of fantastic desert sunsets, wellness resorts and endless nature trails. But to entice their most prized foreign visitors, they tout great shopping at good prices. Louis Vuitton, Dillard's and Apple attract Tucson's neighbors in Mexico, who account for nearly 68% of its international tourists. For decades, millions of Mexican shoppers from neighboring Sonora and Sinaloa have trekked to Arizona for a full day, and sometimes a long weekend, dedicated to buying clothes, electronics and other goods.
WORLD
July 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Every morning during television coverage of the World Cup, on the Mexican equivalent of the "Today" show, co-hosts chat, trade barbs and yuck it up. Behind them, actors in blackface makeup, dressed in fake animal skins and wild "Afro" wigs, gyrate, wave spears and pretend to represent a cartoonish version of South Africa. Yes, in the 21st century, blackface characters on a major television network. But this is Mexico, and definitions of racism are complicated and influenced by the country's own tortured relationship with invading powers and indigenous cultures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Last month, after years of futile goose-chasing, Mexican authorities captured the country's most-wanted criminal, the powerful Sinaloa drug cartel boss Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán. But another legendary Mexican desperado remains at large after 40 years, haunting the fantasies of an adoring public. She's Camelia la Texana, a comely San Antonio ingenue turned drug-smuggling queen who shot and killed her lover in a jealous rage. At least that's her story as immortalized in "Contrabando y Traición" ("Contraband and Betrayal")
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Mexican commuters are furious over a disastrous design failure that has forced the closure of one of this huge city's busiest and newest subway lines. Nearly half a million passengers have had to find alternative transportation after officials shut down most of Line 12, which runs about 15 miles from south of the capital toward its heart. It could take six months or more to repair all of the damage, said officials, who attributed most of the problems to train wheels that are incompatible with the rails.
WORLD
March 12, 2014
MEXICO CITY - One of the best-known leaders of Mexico's vigilante “self-defense” movement has been arrested on suspicion of participating in a double homicide, raising new doubts about the federal government's strategy of partnering with armed campesino groups in the fight against a powerful drug cartel in Michoacan state. Hipolito Mora Chavez, a lime grower who gained fame for leading one of the first local uprisings of autodefensa groups early last year in the small city of La Ruana, was arrested Tuesday evening by state officials.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - If nothing else, the slaying of cartel boss Nazario Moreno Gonzalez by Mexican soldiers may have burst the bubble of mysticism that had made him one of the stranger figures to emerge in the country's drug war. Moreno, whose nicknames included "El Mas Loco" ("The Craziest"), was a founder of Michoacan state's La Familia drug cartel and its offshoot, the Knights Templar - groups that have moved massive amounts of methamphetamine and other drugs north to the United States.
WORLD
March 9, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- You only die twice -- or so it seemed for Nazario Moreno Gonzalez, leader of Mexico's notorious Knights Templar drug cartel. In December 2010, Mexican officials believed that they had killed Moreno, known alternately as "El Chayo" and "El Mas Loco" ("The Craziest"), in a shootout in the troubled state of Michoacan. His body was not recovered, however, and m any locals doubted the story. Since then, western Mexico has been rife with rumors that the charismatic leader had been seen.
SPORTS
March 8, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
LAS VEGAS  - Saul "Canelo" Alvarez wanted to display his boxing heart after suffering his first defeat. The best way to do that was to show his fists. In an impressive display of power punching and an unflinching willingness to exchange with a knockout fighter, Alvarez on Saturday night dominated Mexican countryman Alfredo Angulo and won their light-middleweight fight by 10th-round technical knockout. The fight's stoppage at the 47-second mark of the 10th by referee Tony Weeks was the subject of much jeering by the capacity crowd of 14,610 at MGM Grand Garden Arena, who wanted more from the intense exchanges in a bout that lived up to its billing.
WORLD
May 3, 2013 | By Cecilia Sanchez and Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - After President Obama 's upbeat speech in Mexico on Friday, many in attendance said they were flattered by the description of their country, but others said they hardly recognized the place he had just described. “[That was] a really good speech by President Obama, but what Mexico was he talking about?” said Jose Carlos Cruz, 24, a graduate student in international relations. “Unfortunately in our country, the situation is terrible: There's poverty, unemployment, and even worse, the future is anything but promising.
WORLD
June 25, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- Andres Granier, the former governor of the Mexican state of Tabasco who was recently caught on tape boasting that he owned 300 suits and 400 pairs of shoes, was arrested Tuesday evening by federal authorities on suspicion of tax fraud and “operating with illicit proceeds.” Granier, 65, has taken center stage in Mexican politics in recent weeks  after tapes surfaced of him talking about his lavish lifestyle -- boasts that he...
BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - A Mexican regulatory agency has ordered the massive companies that dominate this nation's telephone and broadcast television sectors to share their network infrastructure with competitors, a move that could seriously alter Mexico's telecommunications landscape in the months and years to come. The rulings by the Federal Telecommunications Institute appeared to be a "step in the right direction" for the Mexican economy, said George W. Grayson, a Mexico specialist at the College of William and Mary.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
Mexican star Saul "Canelo" Alvarez didn't just have to look at himself in the mirror after suffering his first professional loss in a boxing ring last September. He had to peer into the eyes of his people, hear their complaints, appreciate the concerns of those irked because he didn't expend more energy and risk more in the fight of his young life against Floyd Mayweather Jr. "I tried to get him up against the ropes, tried to pound him," Alvarez, 23, said through an interpreter of his majority-decision loss to the unbeaten Mayweather.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|